Fibromyalgia Treatment

Fibromyalgia Treatment

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    A Natalie E. Azar, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Can low-dose Naltrexone be used to treat fibromyalgia?
    It was recently discovered that low-dose Naltrexone, historically used to reverse opioid overdoses, can treat fibromyalgia and other autoimmune diseases. Watch rheumatologist Natalie Azar, MD, discuss this new, promising treatment for fibromyalgia.
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    Ideally, the minimum number of medical team members required to treat a person with fibromyalgia must include:
    • A doctor to oversee the overall treatment regimen including prescribing and monitoring medications.
    • A complementary medical professional to guide the person with fibromyalgia in discerning what type of alternative therapy protocols might be beneficial, such as an aerobic exercise program. This healthcare professional also monitors the program’s success, makes appropriate activity changes and motivates the patient.
    • A mental health expert adept at cognitive behavior therapy who can also counsel people in learning how to make adjustments in their lives to accommodate changes that naturally occur when living with a chronic illness.
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    Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition that can be successfully managed but, at this time, there is no known cure. Multi-disciplinary approaches for management and relief of symptoms are often recommended. Medications, cognitive behavioral therapies and gentle exercise are the most common combinations. In partnership with a healthcare provider, development of self-management strategies and long-term health goals may reduce the chronic symptoms and the frequency, duration and intensity of periodic flares (rapid increase of symptoms).
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    Early studies show that homeopathy may help manage pain caused by fibromyalgia. More studies are needed before a conclusion can be made.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2014 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    Acupuncture: There is evidence from several studies suggesting acupuncture may help with pain relief in fibromyalgia. More high quality studies would help to confirm these study results.

    Needles must be sterile in order to avoid disease transmission. Avoid with valvular heart disease, infections, bleeding disorders, medical conditions of unknown origin, neurological disorders, or if taking anticoagulants. Avoid on areas that have received radiation therapy and during pregnancy. Avoid electroacupuncture with irregular heartbeat or in patients with pacemakers. Use cautiously with pulmonary disease (like asthma or emphysema). Use cautiously in elderly or medically compromised patients, diabetics, or those with a history of seizures.

    Trigger point therapy: There have been several studies that addressed the therapeutic potential of trigger point therapy (the practice of compressing small areas or trigger points in a muscle from which pain is believed to radiate in that area or in unrelated areas). The results of the higher-quality studies show slight, albeit not significant, improvement of myofascial pain. Many of the medium-quality studies illustrate more pronounced improvement and statistical differences. Overall, the studies indicate that trigger point therapy may be effective for myofascial pain. However, future studies need to be performed before any definitive conclusions can be drawn.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/

    Copyright © 2014 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    ARealAge answered

    The best way to ensure exercise improves your fibromyalgia? Don't stop once you start. Getting fit and controlling symptoms does not have a beginning and an end. And being a faithful follower of your exercise program is what brings continuous results. Research suggests that the symptom-improving benefits of any exercise program may take up to 4 weeks to fully kick in, so be patient.

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    ARealAge answered

    Compared with aerobics and strength training, less research has been done on the benefits of stretching for people with fibromyalgia. But some findings do suggest that stretching exercises, including those used in physical therapy and yoga, may help improve fibromyalgia symptoms, such as reducing overall stiffness, improving muscular flexibility, and enhancing well-being.

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    ARealAge answered

    Research suggests that mildly to moderately intense walking may dial down fibromyalgia pain and fatigue. How much patients benefit will depend on several factors, including age, fitness and activity levels, the severity of the fibromyalgia symptoms and whether the activity worsens or improves fibro pain and fatigue. Patients should keep in mind that it’s probably best to do mini walks here and there rather than to take one long walk.

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    ARealAge answered

    Research suggests that cardio-based aerobic exercise can be an effective way to curb fibromyalgia symptoms, including pain, fatigue, anxiety and depression. If patients prefer group workouts, they can choose from a variety of low-impact dance-based aerobics classes, step classes, spin classes, kickboxing classes, and more. If the patient prefers solo workouts, he or she should try treadmill walking, elliptical training, or even roller-skating, hiking or biking.

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    ARealAge answered

    Numerous studies report that this form of low-impact exercise -- especially when done in warm water -- can help reduce fibromyalgia pain and stiffness, as well as fatigue and depression in many people with fibromyalgia. There are a variety of fun, get-wet workouts to choose from, including music-based aqua aerobics, underwater walking or jogging, strength training, stretching and water-based relaxation therapies like yoga, tai chi and Watsu.