Fibromyalgia Causes

Fibromyalgia Causes

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    Fibromyalgia (FM) often occurs following a physical trauma (especially involving the trunk), an acute illness (i.e. hepatitis C, Epstein-Barr virus, Lyme disease) or injury, which may act as a “trigger” in the development of the disorder. Other triggers include psychological stressors such as early life trauma and deployment to war.

    Increasing attention is being devoted to the central nervous system as the underlying mechanism of FM. Studies have suggested that people with FM have generalized disturbance in pain processing and an amplified response to stimuli that would not ordinarily be painful in healthy individuals.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is usually made between the ages of 20 to 50 years. However, this incidence rises with age so that by age 80, approximately 8% of adults meet the American College of Rheumatology classification of fibromyalgia. It is imperative for older people to know that aging does not necessarily mean living with more pain. People who are in pain, regardless of their age, should be seen and treated appropriately by caring doctors. 
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered
    Excessive stress can trigger or exacerbate fibromyalgia fatigue. Some research suggests that the onset of fibromyalgia could be triggered by a severely stressful event, such as a divorce, a job loss or the death of a loved one.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Neurology, answered
    A survey of 100 women with fibromyalgia found that the average woman started experiencing fibromyalgia symptoms at age 46, and menopause had already occurred before fibromyalgia started in two of three women. (In Westernized cultures, menopause is generally expected to occur around age 51.) Although doctors don't know why, studies consistently show that menopause tends to occur nearly 10 years earlier than average in women with fibromyalgia -- around age 42.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    The exact causes of fibromyalgia are not known. It's likely that genes predispose certain people to fibromyalgia, but that something in the person's environment sets it off. One such possible trigger is an injury or illness. A physical trauma, such as a car accident or other bodily injury, may change the way that your brain perceives pain. This change could result in increased sensitivity to pain signals.

    If you suffered from an injury or an acute infection or illness and find you have greater sensitivity to pain now, talk to your doctor or healthcare provider about your symptoms. The first step toward relief is an accurate diagnosis.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    For many people, physical or emotional trauma may act as a trigger for fibromyalgia, a chronic (ongoing) pain condition.

    Studies have found high rates of physical or sexual abuse during childhood among adults who have fibromyalgia. Car accidents, post-traumatic stress disorder, repetitive injuries, viral illnesses and certain diseases have also been associated with the onset of fibromyalgia. Such stressors may change the way the nervous system sends and receives pain signals, so that someone with fibromyalgia may feel pain from something that wouldn't bother someone who didn't have fibromyalgia. More research is needed to understand the role that trauma may play in bringing on fibromyalgia.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Women account for the vast majority of fibromyalgia cases, but no one is certain why because the exact cause of fibromyalgia is still unknown. Some researchers believe that many more men have fibromyalgia than are diagnosed. They believe that some men suffer the symptoms of fibromyalgia but do not seek medical care.

    Also, women may have more symptoms of fibromyalgia than men, such as pelvic pain, painful periods or painful intercourse.

    It is important to understand that significant progress is being made in the diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia. Talk to your doctor or healthcare provider if you have questions or concerns about this condition.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered
    Pregnancy is not known to cause fibromyalgia but it is not uncommon for fibromyalgia patients to have more symptoms and flareups during their pregnancy.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Healthcare, answered

    Some of the latest information from medical journals reveals that in people who suffer with chronic pain, the spinal cord becomes overloaded with input. This makes it hypersensitive to any messages sent its way and causes the spinal cord to overreact to amplify any response. When your body behaves in this manner, you will feel pain from contact (such as a cool breeze) that should virtually have no effect. Because researchers have found that those with FMS often feel higher sensitivity to pain over their entire body, this has led to the idea that their body’s overall pain threshold may be dramatically lower than usual. 

    Other researchers think fibromyalgia may be the result of a genetic tendency, therefore, it could be passed on from generation to generation.  When a person who has this tendency is exposed to certain emotional or physical stressors (like in an illness),  there is a change in their body’s response to stress.  This can result in a higher sensitivity of the entire body to pain.  Scientists theorize that one of these body changes is a low level of a hormone, CRH (corticotropin-releasing hormone), resulting in higher sensitivity to pain and more fatigue, including the fatigue experienced after exercise.

    The hypersensitivity to pain with fibromyalgia may in part be from low levels of serotonin. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter in the brain associated with a calming, anxiety‑reducing reaction. Lower levels of serotonin cause a lower pain threshold and effect sleep habits. The end result may be the chronic widespread pain of fibromyalgia.

    Still other researchers have recently concluded that those with fibromyalgia have significantly less blood flow to the parts of the brain that deal with pain. In studies where fibromyalgia patients were compared to healthy people, those with FMS were found to have twice the level of a brain chemical called Substance P, a neuropeptide involved in pain signals.  This chemical helps nervous system cells send messages to each other about painful stimuli. It is thought that when P levels are elevated in the body, they may produce higher levels of pain.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 5 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    There is a lot we don't know about fibromyalgia, which is why this pain syndrome is sometimes difficult for doctors to accurately diagnose and treat. However, new findings link fibromyalgia to problems within the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the spinal cord and the brain. Some scientists believe that certain dysfunctions with fibromyalgia that occur in the muscles, connective tissue, and the peripheral nervous system that communicate with the CNS. It could be that these malfunctions result in some of the main fibromyalgia symptoms such as deep muscle pain, difficulty sleeping, low mood, and fatigue. Time will tell whether these researchers are correct about the causes of fibromyalgia. 
    See All 5 Answers