Fibromyalgia Causes

Fibromyalgia Causes

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    Fibromyalgia (FM) often occurs following a physical trauma (especially involving the trunk), an acute illness (i.e. hepatitis C, Epstein-Barr virus, Lyme disease) or injury, which may act as a “trigger” in the development of the disorder. Other triggers include psychological stressors such as early life trauma and deployment to war.

    Increasing attention is being devoted to the central nervous system as the underlying mechanism of FM. Studies have suggested that people with FM have generalized disturbance in pain processing and an amplified response to stimuli that would not ordinarily be painful in healthy individuals.
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    The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is usually made between the ages of 20 to 50 years. However, this incidence rises with age so that by age 80, approximately 8% of adults meet the American College of Rheumatology classification of fibromyalgia. It is imperative for older people to know that aging does not necessarily mean living with more pain. People who are in pain, regardless of their age, should be seen and treated appropriately by caring doctors.
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    ARealAge answered
    Excessive stress can trigger or exacerbate fibromyalgia fatigue. Some research suggests that the onset of fibromyalgia could be triggered by a severely stressful event, such as a divorce, a job loss or the death of a loved one.
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    ADawn Marcus, Neurology, answered
    A survey of 100 women with fibromyalgia found that the average woman started experiencing fibromyalgia symptoms at age 46, and menopause had already occurred before fibromyalgia started in two of three women. (In Westernized cultures, menopause is generally expected to occur around age 51.) Although doctors don't know why, studies consistently show that menopause tends to occur nearly 10 years earlier than average in women with fibromyalgia -- around age 42.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    It may be that for some people with fibromyalgia, the condition was triggered by a trauma such as a car accident or illness. Experts believe that the central nervous system plays a major role in the development of fibromyalgia. Studies suggest that some people's bodies overreact to pain and produce stronger pain signals than what they normally would feel, causing symptoms of fibromyalgia.
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    ACeleste Cooper, Rheumatology, answered

    “Often identified as triggers are virus, trauma (accidental or surgical), chemical exposure, abuse (emotional or physical), a prior debilitating illness, or any of these in combination.” (Cooper & Miller, 2010)

    All blogs, posts and answers are based on the work in Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by Celeste Cooper, RN, and Jeff Miller, PhD. 2010, Vermont: Healing Arts press
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    ACeleste Cooper, Rheumatology, answered

    "Often identified as triggers are virus, trauma (accidental or surgical), chemical exposure, abuse (emotional or physical), a prior debilitating illness, or any of these in combination."  (Cooper and Miller, 2010 pg 7)

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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Researchers don't know why fibromyalgia affects women more often than men. According to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seven times as many women as men are diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Experts do believe that there may be a genetic component and that the condition can sometimes run in families.
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    AHoward S. Smith, Pain Medicine, answered
    There is some evidence that fibromyalgia patients may feel less pain if they eliminate monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame, which are found in many processed foods. Both additives may also be associated with migraine headache and other chronic pain ailments. You should be aware of some processed foods that contain these ingredients, even though they may be listed under other names: autolyzed yeast, calcium caseinate, gelatin, glutamate, glutamic acid, hydrolyzed protein, monopotassium glutamate, monosodium glutamate, sodium caseinate, textured protein, yeast extract, yeast food, or yeast nutrient.
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    ACeleste Cooper, Rheumatology, answered

    Most of what I have to say about pregnancy and fibromyalgia is from a personal view and anecdotal one.

    I did have very difficult pregnancies with severe prolonged morning sickness. However, I doubt that pregnancy was the cause of my FM, I suspect the FM was why I had difficult pregnancies, as I had the comorbid conditions then, Raynaud’s, IBS, migraine, frequent UTI’s, etc.

    I have heard others say they had great difficulty and needed some assistance after the birth, because lifting caused great pain. I believe that since we now know myofascial trigger points play a role in peripheral mediated pain in FM, that it is important for you to identify any now and treat them.

    I had difficulty with my left hip going out with pregnancy, and I suspect it was related to trigger points in the area that were aggravated by the weight of the baby. Knowing these things might help you avoid some of these experiences.  

    So my answer is we suspect that physical or emotional trauma is a trigger to FM, and pregnancy definitely puts a strain on the physical. It could be a trigger, though not a cause, men have FM too.  

    Here are two links you might find helpful, one from a scientific aspect, the other from a social one.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21284491

    http://fibromyagiablog.blogspot.com/

    All blogs, posts and answers are based on the work in Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by Celeste Cooper, RN, and Jeff Miller, PhD. 2010, Vermont: Healing Arts press

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