Fibromyalgia Causes

Fibromyalgia Causes

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    Fibromyalgia (FM) often occurs following a physical trauma (especially involving the trunk), an acute illness (i.e. hepatitis C, Epstein-Barr virus, Lyme disease) or injury, which may act as a “trigger” in the development of the disorder. Other triggers include psychological stressors such as early life trauma and deployment to war.

    Increasing attention is being devoted to the central nervous system as the underlying mechanism of FM. Studies have suggested that people with FM have generalized disturbance in pain processing and an amplified response to stimuli that would not ordinarily be painful in healthy individuals.
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    The diagnosis of fibromyalgia is usually made between the ages of 20 to 50 years. However, this incidence rises with age so that by age 80, approximately 8% of adults meet the American College of Rheumatology classification of fibromyalgia. It is imperative for older people to know that aging does not necessarily mean living with more pain. People who are in pain, regardless of their age, should be seen and treated appropriately by caring doctors.
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    ARealAge answered
    Excessive stress can trigger or exacerbate fibromyalgia fatigue. Some research suggests that the onset of fibromyalgia could be triggered by a severely stressful event, such as a divorce, a job loss or the death of a loved one.
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    ADawn Marcus, Neurology, answered
    A survey of 100 women with fibromyalgia found that the average woman started experiencing fibromyalgia symptoms at age 46, and menopause had already occurred before fibromyalgia started in two of three women. (In Westernized cultures, menopause is generally expected to occur around age 51.) Although doctors don't know why, studies consistently show that menopause tends to occur nearly 10 years earlier than average in women with fibromyalgia -- around age 42.
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    ACeleste Cooper, Rheumatology, answered

    Trauma has been identified as a trigger to the development of fibromyalgia, so the answer is yes.

    All blogs, posts and answers are based on the work in Integrative Therapies for Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Myofascial Pain: The Mind-Body Connection by Celeste Cooper, RN, and Jeff Miller, PhD. 2010, Vermont: Healing Arts press  are for educational purposes and not meant to replace medical advice. www.TheseThree.com

    Author of Chapter Five, Living with and Coping Effectively Through Fibromyalgia: Detecting Barriers, Understanding the Clues, in Fibromyalgia Insider Secrets: 10 Top Experts, 2nd Ed. Ebook complied by Deirdre Rawlings, ND, PhD

    http://www.fibromyalgiainsidersecrets.com/whoarewe/Celest.html

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    For many people, physical or emotional trauma may act as a trigger for fibromyalgia, a chronic (ongoing) pain condition.

    Studies have found high rates of physical or sexual abuse during childhood among adults who have fibromyalgia. Car accidents, post-traumatic stress disorder, repetitive injuries, viral illnesses and certain diseases have also been associated with the onset of fibromyalgia. Such stressors may change the way the nervous system sends and receives pain signals, so that someone with fibromyalgia may feel pain from something that wouldn't bother someone who didn't have fibromyalgia. More research is needed to understand the role that trauma may play in bringing on fibromyalgia.
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    ACeleste Cooper, Rheumatology, answered

    "Often identified as triggers are virus, trauma (accidental or surgical), chemical exposure, abuse (emotional or physical), a prior debilitating illness, or any of these in combination."  (Cooper and Miller, 2010 pg 7)

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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Researchers don't know why fibromyalgia affects women more often than men. According to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seven times as many women as men are diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Experts do believe that there may be a genetic component and that the condition can sometimes run in families.
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    AHoward S. Smith, Pain Medicine, answered
    There is some evidence that fibromyalgia patients may feel less pain if they eliminate monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartame, which are found in many processed foods. Both additives may also be associated with migraine headache and other chronic pain ailments. You should be aware of some processed foods that contain these ingredients, even though they may be listed under other names: autolyzed yeast, calcium caseinate, gelatin, glutamate, glutamic acid, hydrolyzed protein, monopotassium glutamate, monosodium glutamate, sodium caseinate, textured protein, yeast extract, yeast food, or yeast nutrient.
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    APaula Greer, Midwifery Nursing, answered
    Pregnancy is not known to cause fibromyalgia but it is not uncommon for fibromyalgia patients to have more symptoms and flareups during their pregnancy.
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