Fibromyalgia Treatment

Fibromyalgia Treatment

Recently Answered

  • 4 Answers
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Could a gentle shock to your system jolt away fibromyalgia symptoms? Some scientists believe that nerve stimulation may be an effective adjunct, or add-on, therapy for fibromyalgia. In this treatment, a doctor uses a special device to deliver a low current of electricity to the vagus nerve. This nerve runs all the way from your brain down to your abdomen. Researchers are studying whether stimulating this nerve can relieve fibromyalgia symptoms. Early results look promising, though it's too soon to say whether nerve stimulation is an effective treatment for fibromyalgia.
    View All 4 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A

    There is no cure for fibromyalgia, but it isn't a life-threatening condition, and it won't cause any permanent damage. Even better, it can often be controlled with the proper treatment, and many cases get better as time goes by. Regular exercise and a combination of medications can help minimize the symptoms associated with fibromyalgia. Keeping stress levels low and staying on a regular sleep schedule can make a big difference as well. Researchers continue to study fibromyalgia in hopes of learning more about the disorder and some day finding a cure.

    View All 3 Answers
  • 9 Answers
    A
    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered

    Fibromyalgia is a notoriously challenging condition to treat. However, there are a number of therapies to consider, so look for a doctor who understands the condition and can help you develop an effective treatment regimen. Your plan for managing fibromyalgia may include:

    • Medications. There are three drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating fibromyalgia. They are pregabalin (Lyrica), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and milnacipran (Savella). Your doctor may also prescribe antidepressants, which appear to relieve fibromyalgia symptoms even if you aren't depressed. Over-the-counter pain relievers may help, too. Depending on your symptoms, your doctor may prescribe other medications, in addition.
    • Sleep aids. Fibromyalgia can really mess up your shut-eye. Some fibromyalgia medications can help you sleep better. Following good sleep habits, such as avoiding caffeine and alcohol late in the day, can help you get some rest, too.
    • Exercise. Some fibromyalgia patients worry that exercise will worsen their symptoms, but research suggests that the opposite is true. Ask your doctor what level of physical activity is right for you.
    • Alternative treatments. With your doctor's consent, trying acupuncture, chiropractic, and dietary supplements may help you to keep pain and other symptoms under control.
    View All 9 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    AJacob Teitelbaum, Integrative Medicine, answered
    Dizziness in the form of disequilibrium is not uncommon in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia. If no vertigo is present (vertigo in CFS is much less common and is where you feel like you or the room is spinning in a circle), the key likely causes are:

    -  Autonomic dysfunction - Increasing salt and water intake and adrenal support are important here (unless one has high blood pressure of heart failure) as would be proper chiropractic adjustment of the atlas area in the neck.
    -  Intermittent drops in blood sugar from low adrenal. If this is the cause, dissolving 1/2-1 teaspoon of sugar under the tongue during an attack should eliminate the attack in under 2 minutes (and usually quicker). The sugar is not a long term solution (though sucking one tic tac during an attack is helpful) but simply tells you to treat for low adrenal issues.
    -  Neck muscle spasm can trigger episodic dizziness.
    -  Have a physician rule out heart problems (abnormal rhythms or valve issues, etc).
    -  Spend a few days at a friend's house and see if the problem resolves. If so, look into a condition called "sick building syndrome."

    In those with vertigo in CFS/FMS (much less common than dizziness), I am likely to presume an infection, such as Lyme, affecting the nerve to the ear and give a trial of long term antibiotics.

    View All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    AJacob Teitelbaum, Integrative Medicine, answered

    Light and sound sensitivity are not uncommon in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia, as it takes energy to sort the pertinent sensory information from the non-pertinent. Adding the medication neurontin (gabapentin) often helps these symptoms. In addition, if taste and smell sensitivity also are present, it is worth looking for carbon monoxide poisoning (from natural gas, gas lights and ovens, etc).

  • 2 Answers
    A
    For relief from excessive sweating, try some of the following remedies:
    • Before sleep, apply antiperspirant to dry hands and feet.
    • Wear loose, breathable clothing made of natural fibers such as cotton and bamboo. When you exercise, wear clothing made of moisture-wicking material.
    • Botox injections for problem areas, such as hands or feet, can be an effective treatment against excessive sweating. Several injections are usually required, and the treatment can last up to a year. Discuss this option with your doctor.
    • In severe cases, your doctor may recommend surgery, or a treatment called iontophoresis, in which an electric current is sent through water to stun the nerves of the affected area, such as the hands or feet. Multiple treatments are required, but the procedure can be up to 80% effective.
    View All 2 Answers