High Blood Pressure Treatment

High Blood Pressure Treatment

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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Lifestyle changes that can help lower blood pressure include the following:
    • Exercise. It's a hard-proven fact that a few minutes a day of cardiovascular exercise can really help drop the blood pressure a couple points and that can be critical, especially for someone running a borderline blood pressure that's just a couple points higher than what it needs to be.
    • Diet. If a high sodium diet is the underlying cause of hypertension, then that needs to be corrected. A lot of foods have so much hidden sodium, including foods that are take-out or foods cooked at home, such as frozen or canned products. It's important for people to look at labels. For instance, the vegetable soup that seems healthy and benign may contain more than half of a days’ worth of sodium. It's really important to become a label reader from that aspect. Take a look at the sodium and the percentages listed. Excess amounts of caffeine can also raise blood pressure.
    • Sleep apnea. Treating sleep apnea, which is often an underdiagnosed condition, can also sometimes bring blood pressure down to a normal zone. People should ask their doctor if that's something that they should be screened for.
    • Stress. Excess amounts of emotional or physical stresses can also raise blood pressure, so that's something to be watchful of, as well.
    Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Robin Miller - long-term blood pressure medications
    The most commonly prescribed blood pressure medication, a diuretic, is often least tolerated for long-term use. In this video, Dr. Robin Miller discusses the types of medications that are more suited for the long term.


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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    There are many different classes of blood pressure medicines, each of which includes many different medications. Due to this fact, it is almost always possible to find an effective blood pressure medicine that a given patient will tolerate without unacceptable side effects. Good news!
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    If you have high blood pressure being on a low-fat diet lowers the changes of plaque build up on your vessels which lowers your susceptibility to have strokes and heart attacks. It would be of great benefit to be on a low-fat diet if you have high blood pressure.
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    A answered

    Blood pressure can increase when you exercise. Until now, nobody knew how to prevent that. New research found that while diuretics didn't stop this blood pressure increase, an angiotensin receptor blocker did. (Some examples of this type of med include Avapro, Cozaar, Diovan, and Hyzaar.) Not every med is right for everyone.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Azopt reduces ocular (eye) pressure in people with ocular hypertension and glaucoma by reducing the amount of fluid produced inside the eye, which in turn reduces pressure inside the eye. Talk to your doctor to see if Azopt is right for you.

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    A answered
    Foods that are low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and total fat and that emphasize fruits, vegetables, and fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products are good for high blood pressure. The DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) has been shown in research to be effective for lowering blood pressure. Reducing your sodium intake (the DASH diet recommends between 1500 and 2300mg of sodium/day) and following the DASH diet plan or the Heart Healthy plan found in the free Sharecare Fitness Application, will assist in lowering your blood pressure. Potassium containing foods are important in offsetting the negative effects of sodium on blood pressure. Foods that are low in sodium and high in potassium are below.
    Examples of foods low in sodium
    • All unprocessed meats, fish, and poultry
    • Cheeses: cream, Monterey, Mozzarella, Ricotta, low salt types
    • Pasta: macaroni, noodles, spaghetti, rice
    • Eggs
    Examples of foods high in potassium
    • Broccoli, carrots, collards, green beans, green, peas, kale, lima beans, potatoes, spinach, squash, sweet potatoes, tomatoes
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    A answered
    Diarrhea and hair loss is a reported side effect with several medications that reduce blood pressure. Cozaar has a small percent of hair loss reported, but diarrhea did occur. Furosemide does not seem to cause hair loss, but both constipation and diarrhea have been reported. Furosemide is generally well-tolerated. Hydrochlorothiazide does not seem to cause either hair loss or diarrhea. You need to discuss your options with your physician so that together you can review your medication history and current medical conditions because each blood pressure medication works differently and works on different aspects of the causes of blood pressure.
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    Controlling high blood pressure in America may benefit from a team-based approach between health care systems, health care providers (those who see and treat patients) and patients to ensure no opportunities are missed.

    High blood pressure control improves when the following occur:
    • Health care systems work with health care providers to help find the best treatment, including medication and lifestyle changes, for patients.
    • Health care providers, i.e. doctors, nurses, pharmacists, etc., put procedures in place to manage medication, recommend more frequent visits to follow up and provide counseling about lifestyle changes.
    • Patients take the initiative to monitor their blood pressure levels between medical visits, take medications as prescribed by their doctor and notify their doctor of any side effects and make lifestyle changes, such as eating a low-sodium diet, exercising and stopping smoking.
    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
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    A answered
    Central-acting agents (or central agonists) work by preventing your brain from telling your nervous system to increase your heart rate and narrow blood vessels.

    Some commonly prescribed drugs in this class include alpha methyldopa (Aldomet), clonidine hydrochloride (Catapres), guanabenz acetate (Wytensin) and guanfacine hydrochloride (Tenex).

    Potential side effects of central agonists include dizziness, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting and sleep problems. More serious side effects include allergic reaction, fast, pounding heart rate and confusion.