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question

How loud does it get in the womb?

Dr. Michael Roizen, MD
Dr. Michael Roizen, MD
Internal Medicine
answer
That ambient sound a baby hears in the womb - mainly blood running through your blood vessels and the movement of your stomach and intestines - actually reaches the level of about 90 decibels (about the level of background noise in an apartment next to an elevated train). While his developing ears can take those internal noise levels, exposure to very loud external noises can endanger an unborn baby's hearing.
YOU: Having a Baby: The Owner's Manual to a Happy and Healthy Pregnancy

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.