Stage 4 Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Stage 4 Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Stage 4 Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma is the final stage of this common form of skin cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma begins in the squamous cells, or keratinocytes, which make up the outer layer of the skin. By this stage, the cancer has spread to lymph nodes, bones, nearby tissues and other organs in the body. Treatment varies, depending on the size of the tumor and how far the cancer has spread. Learn more about diagnosing and treating stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma with expert advice from Sharecare.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    There are several things you can do that may help prevent stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma. If you are diagnosed with an earlier stage of squamous cell carcinoma, the most important way to prevent it from advancing to stage 4 is to get treatment right away. It's also important to check your skin regularly for any unusual symptoms, especially if you've been treated for an earlier stage of squamous cell carcinoma or if you've had any type of skin cancer. To prevent squamous cell carcinoma from developing in the first place, one important thing you can do is to limit your sun exposure. Avoid the sun when it's at its strongest (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.). If you're outside, wear a strong sunscreen year-round, and wear protective clothing that covers your arms and legs. Take care of your overall health by eating a nutritious diet rich in antioxidants, and don't smoke.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma affects men and women in pretty much the same ways. The only difference between its effects on men and women is that in general, males are more likely than females to develop squamous cell carcinoma. However, because this is a relatively common type of cancer for both sexes, it's important that everyone take precautions to protect their skin from the sun and to check their skin frequently for any symptoms of squamous cell carcinoma.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    The first step in diagnosing stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma is usually a physical exam that includes an inspection of your skin and a review of your medical history. Then, if doctors suspect stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma, they will perform a biopsy, which involves removing a part of the affected skin and analyzing it under a microscope. At stage 4, the squamous cell carcinomas are often relatively large and deep, so doctors often surgically remove part or all of the growth for analysis. If doctors suspect that the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes, they may also biopsy the lymph nodes and other surrounding tissue.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma begins in the squamous cells, or keratinocytes, that make up your top layer of skin. When the DNA that controls the cells' growth is damaged (usually by UV rays), it causes an overgrowth and buildup of skin cells. This results in a tumor that causes the visible symptoms on your skin, such as scaly patches or crusted sores. Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma most commonly affects areas of skin that are exposed to the sun - especially the face, neck, and arms - but may develop almost anywhere on the body. In this stage, the tumor may cover large areas of skin, and it may penetrate through the skin and into the underlying bone. By the time it reaches stage 4, squamous cell carcinoma has also spread into lymph nodes and organs throughout the body.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma begins in the squamous cells, or keratinocytes, which make up the outer layer of skin. Normally, these cells go through a growth cycle in which old cells die and are pushed out by new cells continuously. In stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma, the DNA that controls that growth cycle is damaged, most commonly by ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. This causes an overgrowth and buildup of squamous cells, which forms a squamous cell carcinoma. If an earlier stage of squamous cell carcinoma is left untreated, it will advance to stage 4, meaning the tumor will grow larger and will spread throughout the body.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If you notice symptoms of stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma, you should talk to your doctor right away. Symptoms are often hard to distinguish from other conditions because they may look like dry, irritated skin or a pesky sore. However, if you notice any of these symptoms that don't heal after a few weeks, it's a good idea to talk to a doctor. This is especially important because by the time it's reached stage 4, the cancer has already started to spread throughout the body.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Symptoms of stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma usually begin with some kind of skin lesion or growth. Often, the tumors of squamous cell carcinoma look like a scaly red patch of skin that won't heal. These tumors are often crusty and raised, and they may cause sores or ulcers that last for several weeks. At stage 4, these tumors may be large, both in diameter and in depth. Stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma most commonly develops on areas of skin that are exposed to the sun (such as the face, neck, and arms) but can develop almost anywhere, including the mouth and anus. Lesions are also more likely to develop on skin that's already been damaged, either by a scar or by a chronic skin infection or ulcer.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Squamous cell carcinoma at any stage, including stage 4, very rarely affects children. The average age when people are first diagnosed with the condition is 66 years old. In general, younger people are starting to be affected by squamous cell carcinoma much more frequently. However, it's still quite rare for children to develop this condition because it's often caused by a lifetime of exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Sun exposure is one of the most significant risk factors for stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma. Sun exposure, especially over an adult's whole lifetime, greatly increases the amount of ultraviolet (UV) radiation your skin gets. It's thought that those UV rays are what may damage DNA and initially cause stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma. Because of this risk, it's a good idea to avoid excessive sun exposure and to protect your skin with sunscreen and protective clothing.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    It's difficult to determine the exact number of cases of stage 4 squamous cell carcinoma. This is due in part to the fact that the cancer may be diagnosed and treated before it reaches stage 4. Also, the disease usually progresses pretty slowly, so stage 4 may not be as common as earlier stages. In general, squamous cell carcinoma is a relatively common type of skin cancer. It's estimated that there are about 200,000 to 300,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States each year.