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What is the difference between clitoral and G-spot orgasm?

Emily Nagoski
Emily Nagoski on behalf of Good In Bed
Psychology

Orgasm happens when you generate a sufficient level of sexual tension in your body to cross a threshold, when all that tension releases explosively. For those familiar with the sensations of clitoral orgasm, you might recognize these signs: erratic heart rate and breathing, muscle spasms, waves of pleasure, and the characteristic pulsing of the pubococcygeal muscle at

the mouth of the vagina. For women, the whole thing takes something like 10 seconds.

 

Orgasms generated by G-spot stimulation tend to feel different from clitoral orgasms. In general, women say that they don’t experience the same rhythmic pulses that accompany the standard clitoral orgasm. Orgasm from G-spot stimulation is a bigger, whole-body kind of experience, where the sensation fills you up until you don’t believe you could possibly feel more, and then you do and it fills up your entire body again. You might have a harder time identifying the beginning and end of a G-spot orgasm because often there is a long, slow approach, and a long, slow orgasm, with a long, slow denouement.
The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms

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The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms

Want to learn how to achieve 487 different kinds of orgasms?If so, you’re reading the wrong guidebook. Despite what many in the media would have you believe, there’s no such thing as a rainbow...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.