Respiratory Allergies

Respiratory Allergies

Respiratory Allergies
Dust, mold and pet dander are common triggers for allergies that affect the respiratory system, causing coughing, sneezing, congestion, sinus pressure and difficulty breathing. A cleaning routine that involves bleach and regularly vacuuming carpets and furniture and washing bedding can reduce these irritants. If your symptoms are hard to control, or if the substance that bothers you can't be avoided, antihistamines or allergy shots might be needed.

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    Spores are reproductive cells produced by fungi (including molds), and some plants (ferns, moss) and bacteria. Spores help these organisms to spread, and they can cause health symptoms and even serious conditions in some people.
     
    For example, in people who are sensitive to mold, exposure to mold spores can cause a stuffy nose, eye, skin and/or throat irritation, wheezing and other breathing difficulties and headaches. Rarely, it can cause severe reactions, including fever and shortness of breath. Because spores are tiny, they can be inhaled into the lungs fairly easily, and people who have chronic lung conditions such as COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) may develop mold infections in their lungs. Other diseases associated with breathing in fungal spores include toxic pneumonitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, asthma and chronic sinusitis, among others.
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    How can I lessen allergic reactions to pets?
    If a child is allergic to a pet, the recommendation is usually to get rid of the pet. However, in this video, I will give tips on how you can manage allergies with a pet in the house.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    How can I avoid dust allergies?
    Dust mites, which causes dust allergies, live in your bedding, furniture and carpets, so it's common to wake up in the morning with symptoms. In this video, allergy specialist Tania Elliot, MD, shares some tips for avoiding dust allergies at home.
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    Allergies - man sneezing pollen

    Moving to southwestern - or desert - states may relieve your allergies for a few months. However, within a short period of time, new allergies to local plants can develop.


    Also, people in those states (both new residents and others) have transplanted some of their ornamental grasses and plants from "back home," thereby introducing some of the same old pollens into this new environment.

    In short, you just can't move away from allergies, except maybe to the moon (then again, they do have moon dust up there).

    Allergies - man sneezing pollen
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Dr. Clifford Bassett - How do I know which pollens are triggering my allergies?

    To find out which pollens are triggering your allergies, all it takes is a simple doctor's visit, says allergy and immunology specialist Dr. Clifford Bassett. Learn the details by watching this video.


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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    Dr. Clifford Bassett - How do I know if pollen levels are high?

    A quick check on your computer or smartphone can tell you what the pollen count is -- and even help you plan for the next few days, says allergy and immunology specialist Dr. Clifford Bassett. Learn where to click by watching the video.


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    If you don't see a local pollen count in your local newspaper, or on TV or the radio, you can check the count on the Web sites of the following organizations:

    - The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology's National Allergy Bureau
    - The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America
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    While a rose by any other name would certainly smell as sweet, don't put your nose too far into the flower to test it out. Flowers may make wonderful gifts, but to a person susceptible to allergic rhinitis, you might as well be bringing a bouquet of weeds into their apartment.

    Flower pollens don't disperse in the breeze as easily as some other pollens, but they can cause problems within an enclosed environment. If you feel that you have to give flowers, choose those with a few prominent stamens, like lilies, for example. (Stamens are the flower's pollen-producing male reproductive organs).

    Prior to offering the flower, perform some simple surgery by carefully removing the stamens. Orchids are another good choice, since they don't readily release pollens. They are used as a symbol by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    As much time as you spend in your bed, dust mites, the active ingredient in house dust, spend even more. In just two weeks, a new bed can have two million of these tiny critters shacking up in it. Although you can't see these allergens, their feces is a huge cause of itching, watery eyes, nasal congestion, and coughing. 


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Birds, gerbils, mice, guinea pigs, rats, bunnies, and horses can all cause allergic reactions in people who are sensitive to their dander and, with some animals, their saliva. But good news for frog and snake enthusiasts: Amphibians and reptiles aren't allergenic.

    Fish seem to be relatively free of allergens, given that they generally don't shed in our living room. However, just because they don't have dander doesn't mean you're in the clear: Aquarium owners should be on the lookout for mold spores growing around the fish tank.