Impact Of Nicotine Addiction On The Body

Impact Of Nicotine Addiction On The Body

Impact Of Nicotine Addiction On The Body
Nicotine addiction is just as strong as addiction to alcohol or cocaine, and it causes changes in the brain that make you crave nicotine even more. Once inhaled into the lungs through smoke, nicotine is absorbed into the bloodstream and carried throughout your body. Nicotine can affect the heart, blood vessels, hormones and brain function. Learn more from our experts about how to overcome it.

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  • 5 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Absolutely.  It is hard to get emphysema without smoking or high particle addiction such as pollution or high particle exposure such as addiction to the same type of particles that smoking emits.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Yes.  The most predictable adverse effect of smoking or tobacco in general is it causes inflammation in your arteries, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke, memory loss, peripheral vascular disease, impotence, and even wrinkles.  A wrinkle is no different than a heart attack or impotence, it is just different blood vessels affected.  The ones in your skin cause wrinkles, the ones in your penis cause impotence, and the ones in your heart cause heart attacks, and the ones in your brain, memory loss.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Tobacco - smoking lung cancer

    Nicotine causes dopamine release in the brain.  Now, nicotine is not that bad of and by itself, except it addicts you to it and a lot of pleasure symptoms go through dopamine release.  Sugar release is dopamine, sex release is dopamine, heroin release is dopamine, and nicotine from cigarettes does too.  The real problem is that once you are addicted to it, you go with the other things that are bad in cigarettes just because you need the nicotine.  That causes inflammation in your arteries, inflammation in your immune system leading to increased risk of heart disease, memory loss,  impotence, wrinkles, and leading to increased risk of many cancers, not just lung cancer.

    Tobacco - smoking lung cancer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Whether your voice goes back to normal after you quit smoking depends on how damaged your vocal cords are. Many changes, such as hoarseness due to dryness and inflammation, should be reversible. Once you quit smoking, the air and blood flow to your vocal cords will normalize and you should begin to sound like normal. To help things along, drink plenty of water to keep your vocal cords moist.

    If you developed polyps, lesions or tumors on your vocal cords, you should see a doctor who specializes in ear, nose and throat care. You may need to have the tumors removed before your voice will change back to the way it was.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    It's no big secret that smoking increases your risk for lung cancer. But it also increases your risk of other cancers. If you smoke, you are more likely to develop:
    • Lung cancer - 90% of lung cancer cases happen in smokers
    • Stomach cancer
    • Pancreatic cancer
    • Oral cancer (including cancers of the mouth, tongue and throat)
    • Esophageal cancer
    • Bladder cancer
    • Kidney cancer
    • Cervical cancer
    • Acute myeloid leukemia, a blood cell cancer
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      A , Internal Medicine, answered
      There are 440,000 in the United States and four million worldwide yearly. It is the leading cause of death in the world higher than infectious disease, greater than obesity, greater than guns
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      A , Internal Medicine, answered

      Yes. Smoking decreases new tissue formation which is a key in healing. So cuts, bruises, both on the inside and outside take longer to heal, and back pain becomes more chronic.

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      A , Internal Medicine, answered
      Nicotine withdrawal is the period of time, usually lasting a few days to a week, when smokers who quit experience uncomfortable symptoms. Nicotine is a highly addictive drug - just as addictive as cocaine - and you'll start to feel withdrawal symptoms within a few hours of quitting tobacco. You'll feel nicotine cravings, of course, along with a variety of other symptoms such as irritability, anxiety, depression, and sugar cravings. Get past that first week, however, and the withdrawal symptoms fade away over the next month or so. 
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      A , Internal Medicine, answered
      Dr. Robin Miller - smoking affects heart

      Smoking is terrible for heart health, but does it affect the sexes in the same way? In this video, Dr. Robin Miller reveals which gender is more at risk for heart disease due to smoking.


    • 1 Answer
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      Many studies have shown that the combination of smoking and asbestos exposure is particularly hazardous. Smokers who are also exposed to asbestos have a risk of developing lung cancer that is greater than the individual risks from asbestos and smoking added together. There is evidence that quitting smoking will reduce the risk of lung cancer among asbestos-exposed workers. Smoking combined with asbestos exposure does not appear to increase the risk of mesothelioma. However, people who were exposed to asbestos on the job at any time during their life or who suspect they may have been exposed should not smoke.

      This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.