Impact Of Nicotine Addiction On The Body

Impact Of Nicotine Addiction On The Body

Impact Of Nicotine Addiction On The Body
Nicotine addiction is just as strong as addiction to alcohol or cocaine, and it causes changes in the brain that make you crave nicotine even more. Once inhaled into the lungs through smoke, nicotine is absorbed into the bloodstream and carried throughout your body. Nicotine can affect the heart, blood vessels, hormones and brain function. Learn more from our experts about how to overcome it.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Whether your voice goes back to normal after you quit smoking depends on how damaged your vocal cords are. Many changes, such as hoarseness due to dryness and inflammation, should be reversible. Once you quit smoking, the air and blood flow to your vocal cords will normalize and you should begin to sound like normal. To help things along, drink plenty of water to keep your vocal cords moist.

    If you developed polyps, lesions or tumors on your vocal cords, you should see a doctor who specializes in ear, nose and throat care. You may need to have the tumors removed before your voice will change back to the way it was.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Yes.  The most predictable adverse effect of smoking or tobacco in general is it causes inflammation in your arteries, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke, memory loss, peripheral vascular disease, impotence, and even wrinkles.  A wrinkle is no different than a heart attack or impotence, it is just different blood vessels affected.  The ones in your skin cause wrinkles, the ones in your penis cause impotence, and the ones in your heart cause heart attacks, and the ones in your brain, memory loss.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Absolutely.  It is hard to get emphysema without smoking or high particle addiction such as pollution or high particle exposure such as addiction to the same type of particles that smoking emits.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Tobacco - smoking lung cancer

    Nicotine causes dopamine release in the brain.  Now, nicotine is not that bad of and by itself, except it addicts you to it and a lot of pleasure symptoms go through dopamine release.  Sugar release is dopamine, sex release is dopamine, heroin release is dopamine, and nicotine from cigarettes does too.  The real problem is that once you are addicted to it, you go with the other things that are bad in cigarettes just because you need the nicotine.  That causes inflammation in your arteries, inflammation in your immune system leading to increased risk of heart disease, memory loss,  impotence, wrinkles, and leading to increased risk of many cancers, not just lung cancer.

    Tobacco - smoking lung cancer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Lung cancer is rare without smoking or radon or articulate measures such as being exposed to arsenic in mining, and other things like that.  More than 90%, some say as many as 97%, of lung cancer is related to smoking.  Clearly, not everyone who smokes gets lung cancer.  It is a vulnerability, so if your father developed it, or your mother developed it, you may have a risk for it, but the heat and inflammation caused by smoking, and the particulates caused by smoking set up an inflammatory reaction that in specific DNA triggers cancer.  

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Smoking causes two derangements to your vocal chords. One is inflammation which gives you that hoarse raspy sound and two is it causes polyp formation the outcome of that inflammation and that polyp formation can give you a very soft or less than strong voice.

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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    If you’re thinking about having a baby -- or if you’re pregnant right now -- you have even more good reasons to quit:

    • Lower your chances of having a miscarriage or serious problems with your pregnancy. When you smoke, you breathe in carbon monoxide -- the same gas that comes out of your car’s tailpipe.

    • Increase the chance that your baby will be born healthy.
    The earlier you quit, the better for your baby. Yet even later in a pregnancy, you can lower the risk to your baby by stopping smoking.

    • Lower your baby’s risk of dying from SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome). Women who smoke during and after pregnancy also put their babies at a higher risk of asthma and infections.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    You bet smoking increases your risk of heart problems, including death by heart attack. The bad effects of tobacco on your heart have been known for decades. Tobacco raises your blood pressure, raises your heart rate, lowers your good (HDL) cholesterol, and clogs your arteries with fatty plaques. It lowers your ability to exercise and increases your blood's tendency to form artery-blocking blood clots. The good news is that quitting cigarettes cuts your heart risk. One year after you quit, your risk drops to half that of a smoker.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    It causes inflammation in your arteries and your immune system.  The immune system part leads to cancer and inability to fight infections and poor healing of damage that you get.  It also causes heart disease, stroke, memory loss, impotence, peripheral vascular disease with amputation, decay in orgasm quality, and wrinkling of the skin.  If those aren't enough, it also causes you to not heal wounds and to have 12-18 years more disability than you might have had or than you were predicted to have were you not to smoke.

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    A answered
    If you smoke, the good news is you can do something right now to reduce your risk for cardiovascular disease - stop smoking!

    Women who smoke, especially those who are overweight and those who take birth control pills and other hormone-based contraceptives, are among the most at risk for heart disease. About 80 percent of women under 40 who have heart attacks are smokers, but according to the American Cancer Society, the risk of heart disease is greatly reduced as soon as 1 to 2 years after you quit. Research has also shown that, after 10 to 15 years of not smoking, your risk of stroke returns to what it would be if you had never smoked.

    Talk to your doctor about tools and techniques to help you stop smoking or look online or in your community for a support group. Many of these support groups are specifically for women.
     
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