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Does curcumin interact with other medications?

Curcumin can raise the risk of uncontrolled bleeding if taken with aspirin, blood thinners (coumadin or heparin), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen, and anti-platelet medicines (clopidogrel, ticlopidine). Other medications that may interact with curcumin include H-2 receptor blockers, like Zantax, and protein pump inhibitors, such as Prevacid or Prilosec. Curcumin can also cause dangerous interactions with certain liver medications. Curcumin lowers levels of blood sugar, so it may be risky to take with diabetes medications such as: acarbose, Actos, Avandia, glimepiride, glipizide, glyburide, Glyset, Januvia, metformin, Onglyza and Prandin. Curcumin can also interact when used in combination with herbal supplements that slow down the rate at which blood clots. These include: danshen, devil's claw, eleuthero, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, horse chestnut, panax ginseng, papain, red clover and saw palmetto. In addition, herbal products that lower blood sugar levels, including eleuthero, fenugreek and kudzu, may interact with curcumin.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.