Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements

Herbal Supplements
Herbal supplements are dietary supplements derived from nature. Herbal plants or parts of a plant are broken down and used for their scent, flavor and therapeutic benefits. When taken as a supplement, they can deliver strong benefits, however, herbal supplements are not regulated by the FDA and can have dangerous side effects. They act like drugs once in your system and can affect metabolism, circulation and excretion of other substances in your body. It is important to discuss with your doctor if you are on prescription medications, are breastfeeding or have chronic illnesses and want to add herbal supplements to your health regimen.

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    Herbs include flowering plants, shrubs, trees, moss, fern, algae, seaweed or fungus. In most cultures, including Western culture, herbs are used in medicine not only as a part of the treatment of disease, but also in the enhancement of life, physically, emotionally and spiritually. Plant parts, including flowers, fruits, leaves, twigs, bark, roots or seeds, are all considered usable. 
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Ellagic acid is a phytochemical found in pomegranates, raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, cranberries, walnuts and pecans. It's been shown to reduce the risk of cancer and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or bad cholesterol. Pomegranates are a wonderful source of ellagic acid. Mice fed pomegranate juice were found to have decreased blood vessel plaques and blockages. It also lowers blood pressure.
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    For the homeopathic treatment of arthritis, guaiacum is suitable for people whose symptoms include rheumatic affections of the small joints, especially the wrists and fingers. These symptoms may be worse from warmth and better from cold applications.
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    The essential oil of pennyroyal is considered toxic. Death has been reported after the consumption of small amounts. A characteristic noted in most cases of pennyroyal overdose is a strong minty smell on the patient's breath.
     
    A possible role for N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in the management of pennyroyal overdose has been suggested. However, this application has not been confirmed by animal or human studies.
     
    The essential oil of pennyroyal may act as an emmenagogue (menstrual flow stimulant) and induce abortion. However, it may do so at lethal or near-lethal doses, making this action unpredictable and dangerous. Future research to determine the safety and efficacy of the less toxic parts of the pennyroyal plant on the menstrual cycle is needed before a recommendation can be made.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Bogbean supplements, taken as a tincture or extract, are made from the leaves of the bogbean plant. The herb is often used in processed foods to add flavor, and a tea can be made with the dried leaves.

    Although there isn't much research on the effect of bogbean leaves, they do contain an ingredient that may boost your appetite.

    The amount commonly used by food manufacturers is safe, but  high doses can upset the gastrointestinal tract and possibly cause bleeding.
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    Tea tree oil is obtained by steam distillation of the leaves of Melaleuca alternifolia. Tea tree oil is purported to have antiseptic properties and has been used traditionally to prevent and treat infections. While numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated antimicrobial properties of tea tree oil (likely due to the compound terpinen-4-ol), only a small number of high-quality trials have been published. Human studies have focused on the use of topical tea tree oil for fungal infections (including fungal infections of the nails and athlete's foot), acne, and vaginal infections. However, there is a lack of definitive available evidence for the use of tea tree oil in any of these conditions, and further study is warranted.
     
    Tea tree oil should not be used orally; there are reports of toxicity after consuming tea tree oil by mouth. When applied to the skin, tea tree oil is reported to be mildly irritating and has been associated with the development of allergic contact dermatitis, which may limit its potential as a topical agent for some patients.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    The genus Sassafras contains two main species, Sassafras albidum andSassafras tzumu. Sassafras albidumis found in eastern North America, and Sassafras tzumu is found in Asia, primarily in China.

    Although sassafras was used originally in Native American medicine, sassafras should not be used internally, as safrole found in sassafras oil and tea is carcinogenic (cancer-causing). Increased incidence of esophageal cancer has been noted in areas with habitual sassafras consumption. In addition, safrole is hepatotoxic (liver damaging).

    There is insufficient evidence in humans to support the use of sassafras for any indication.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Bladderwrack, also known as fucus vesiculous, grows in both the northern Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is rich in nutrient and contains a fair amount of magnesium, potassium, and micronutrients. Micronutrients are often not found in many other foods we normally eat.

    One nutrient it contains is iodine. Iodine is an essential nutrient for the thyroid gland. Bladderwrack has been used in traditional natural medicine to help support the thyroid for years. This is considered helpful for those that have hypothyroidism, also known as underactive thyroid. In truth, there needs to be studies to confirm this, but anecdotal reports suggest it can be effective.

    The best way to take this is in capsule form. Have your blood checked, and look for underactive symptoms to improve (symptoms like constipation, feeling cold, dry hair, raised cholesterol, and slow thinking) and your blood thyroid levels to normalize.

    Because bladderwrack is harvested in the ocean, you want make sure you check the labels to make sure it was harvested in clean water and is contaminant-free. People who have overstimulated thyroid conditions should not take bladderwrack.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Very few people are ever deficient in chromium. Taking supplemental chromium in moderate amounts seems to have very little risk. No serious bad side effects from a high intake of chromium have been reported. The Institute of Medicine has not set an upper limit for chromium, meaning even high doses may be safe.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Country mallow is an unsafe dietary supplement derived from the root, leaves and/or seeds of a shrub native to India. It is also called heartleaf and heartleaf sida. It contains ephedrine which has been linked to serious side effects including hypertension, myocardial infarction (MI), seizure and stroke. It has been used for many things including weight loss. The claim is that it causes you to burn more calories. It is banned in the US.