Advertisement

What is the role of the heart?

The heart’s job is to collect blood from all areas of the body, pump the blood to the lungs where it receives oxygen, collect the oxygen-rich blood from the lungs, and pump it to all areas of the body.

The heart is composed of four chambers or rooms. The top two chambers are called atriums, and are the “collecting” chambers of the heart. The bottom two chambers are called ventricles, and are the “pumping” chambers of the heart.

This content originally appeared online in "The Patient Guide to Heart, Lung, and Esophageal Surgery" from the Society of Thoracic Surgery.

The heart is the body's central blood pumping station. Its role is to pump blood cells to the lungs to pick up oxygen, and then pump those blood cells all over the body, delivering oxygen. When the heart is relaxed, it fills up with blood. When it contracts, it pumps the blood back out and into the body.

Your heart is a pumping muscle responsible for circulating oxygen-rich blood throughout your body. There are four chambers inside your heart: the two upper chambers are called atria and the two lower chambers are called ventricles. The heart muscle squeezes blood from chamber to chamber. Your heart contains coronary arteries, tubelike branches, which are attached to your aorta (the large blood vessel that carries blood and oxygen from your heart to the rest of your body).

Continue Learning about Healthy Circulatory System

5 Ways to Take Your Job To Heart
5 Ways to Take Your Job To Heart
In season five of The Office, Dwight Schrute (Rainn Wilson) stages what he hopes will be a more compelling fire drill by setting the office on fire. T...
Read More
What is the structure of an artery?
Kelly TraverKelly Traver
All of our arteries have three layers: a thin inner layer, a muscular middle layer, and a fibrous ou...
More Answers
6 Foods That Can Lower Blood Pressure
6 Foods That Can Lower Blood Pressure6 Foods That Can Lower Blood Pressure6 Foods That Can Lower Blood Pressure6 Foods That Can Lower Blood Pressure
These simple swaps can reduce your heart disease risk.
Start Slideshow
Health Clues from Your Fingernails
Health Clues from Your Fingernails

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.