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How do I know if I need to get tested for hepatitis?

See your doctor for testing for hepatitis if you have symptoms of hepatitis, such as yellowing of the eyes or skin, dark urine, or pale colored stools. Even without these symptoms, you should consider testing for hepatitis C if you have used IV street drugs, gotten tattoos, had sex with someone who might have hepatitis, or if you were born between 1945 and 1965.
If you're wondering if you should be tested for hepatitis, pay attention to your body. If you experience symptoms, such as eyes or skin turning yellow, a loss of appetite, nausea and fever or extreme fatigue for weeks or months, you may be infected with hepatitis. However, bear in mind that most infected persons have no symptoms and can pass the virus without knowing it. Therefore, you should get tested if you have put yourself at risk for the three main types of hepatitis: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Blood transfusions before 1992 and injection drug use put you at greater risk for those three types. Unprotected sex with multiple partners is the biggest risk factor for hepatitis B or C infection. Some major medical organizations recommend that everyone born between 1945 and 1965 undergo hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody testing.

This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.