Breast Reconstruction Surgery

Breast Reconstruction Surgery

Breast Reconstruction Surgery
Women who have aggressive forms of breast cancer, or who are at high risk of developing the disease, sometimes choose to have a mastectomy, the surgical removal of one or both breasts. Some patients may then choose to have surgery to reconstruct their breasts to restore their form and shape. During this procedure, doctors can replace any skin, breast tissue or a nipple that they may have removed during the surgery. (If you still need radiation therapy after your mastectomy, your doctor may suggest you wait for reconstructive surgery until after you finish treatment.) Breast implants, filled with either silicone or saline, can be used to reshape your breast, or you can even use your own tissue, a procedure called flap surgery. Both breast implants and flap surgery are complex procedures, each with their own risks; they may require second surgeries to position the breasts correctly. Most insurance companies will cover this type of reconstructive surgery. Learn more about breast reconstruction with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    The goal of breast reconstruction is ultimately to restore the shape of the breast, the breast symmetry and the sense of feminine identity. Doctors can do this using a variety of techniques. It’s important to understand that reconstruction is always performed in multiple steps. It’s never a one-off technique.
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    A Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, answered on behalf of
    The effectiveness of breast reconstruction surgery is multifold, not only in restoring normalcy and symmetry of the cancer surgery defect, but also as importantly, in reassuring a sense of self confidence and physical and emotional being of the woman. With the advances of surgical techniques as well as development of safer and more natural appearing and feeling synthetic breast implants, the final result of the reconstructive surgery of the missing breast, as a result of mastectomy, are often strikingly non-distinguishable from the shape and feel and texture of the natural breast. Patients are often able to resume their normal physical activities within a few weeks after surgery and wear the type of clothes they wore before such otherwise severely disfiguring surgeries.
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    A Plastic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    Who decides what type of reconstructive breast surgery I should have after mastectomy?
    The details of your reconstructive surgery after mastectomy may be decided during the surgery itself. In this video, Natalie Driessen, MD, a plastic and reconstructive surgeon at Riverside Community Hospital, describes how these decisions are made.
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    A Transplant Surgery, answered on behalf of
    Surgery treats breast cancer by removing the cancerous cells from the body.
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    A superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap procedure is a breast reconstructive procedure used to build a woman a breast from her own natural tissues following treatment for breast cancer. Your plastic surgeon will do everything possible to make your breasts look and feel as natural as possible. There will be scars at the tissue donor site as well as on the reconstructed breast, but these tend to be well hidden by standard clothing.

    You may require a final surgery after your superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap in order to make your breasts appear as symmetric and natural as possible. You should discuss with your surgeon all of your concerns and expectations for post-surgery appearance and recovery.

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    A Plastic Surgery, answered on behalf of

    Simultaneous breast reconstruction is an option open to women who do not need breast irradiation, or a larger dose of radiation given over a short period of time. Your surgeon will reconstruct your breast or breasts at the same time as your mastectomy.

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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    During immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction, a tissue expander or in some cases a permanent silicone implant may be placed. After the mastectomy is finished by the general surgeon, the plastic surgeon will usually place a tissue expander with a port under the skin. Serial tissue expansions weekly are performed for several months. This allows safe expansion of the pocket for the later exchange for a permanent silicone gel prosthesis. Patients whom undergo lumpectomy may have permanent gel implant placed at the same settings. Patients with advanced cancer requiring radiation therapy are Not normally candidates for immediate breast reconstruction.
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    Some women are not good candidates for breast conserving surgery. These women include:

    • Those with multiple tumors in the breast occupying several different sections
    • Those who have had lumpectomy with radiation in the past
    • Those who have had mantle radiation for treatment of other types of cancer as a child or young adult
    • Those who refuse to have radiation after lumpectomy for personal reasons
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    A Plastic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    A delayed breast reconstruction takes place after all of the recommended therapies to treat the cancer are completed. One benefit of waiting for reconstruction is that it allows enough time to make sure all of the cancer has been treated.
    Some women choose to delay breast reconstruction because they aren't comfortable weighing all the options at once when they are struggling with a diagnosis of cancer. Others need time to come to terms with losing one or both of their breasts. Women who are overweight, or who smoke or have high blood pressure, may be advised to wait for reconstruction as well.
    Here at Johns Hopkins, we specialize in complex breast reconstruction procedures like these, including revisions to other surgeries where complications have developed.
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    A superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap procedure is a breast reconstructive procedure used to build a woman a breast from her own natural tissues following treatment for breast cancer. During this procedure your surgeon takes tissue from the top of your buttocks to create breast tissue. This is usually done instead of a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap procedure, which takes skin and tissue from your abdomen to reconstruct your breast. An SGAP flap is preferable to a DIEP flap if you do not have adequate skin and tissue in your abdomens, or have had previous abdominal surgeries that may have interfered with blood vessels that the DIEP flap requires.