Breast Cancer Prevention

Breast Cancer Prevention

Breast Cancer Prevention
Whether you have family history of breast cancer or not, you can take steps to prevent this common cancer in women. Some risk factors are lifestyle-related, while others are tied to genetics. Exercising and eating healthy are a start, as well as quitting smoking and limiting alcohol. Your primary care provider can help assess your breast cancer risk; regular breast screenings and exams can catch cancer early. Women with increased risk for breast cancer, who carry BRCA genes for example, can consider risk-reducing surgery with their doctor. Learn more about preventing breast cancer and how to identify signs of cancer with our expert advice.

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    A answered

    There is no specific way to prevent breast cancer. Most cancers occur due to chance and for no known reason. Researchers have ideas of how breast cancer forms, but little information as to why -- much less, why in any one particular case. Researchers have identified risk factors that increase some women's chances of getting breast cancer. Some risk factors, like your age, are unalterable. While others, such as the amount of colorful vegetables you eat, are within your control. All of these factors are simply risk factors. Having one or more does not mean that you will get breast cancer. Likewise, altering a risk factor, if you can, doesn't mean that you won't get breast cancer. If you are ever diagnosed with breast cancer, do not think that it was your fault or that you could have done something to prevent it. All women are at risk for developing breast cancer. (However, most women vastly overrate their risk for developing breast cancer. It's not all that common.) Most cancers will occur in spite of any risk factors or preventive steps. Cancer happens. It is no one's fault.

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    A Transplant Surgery, answered on behalf of
    95% of breast cancers are not linked to genetic risk factors.  Genetics can be useful in determining a genetic mutation linked to breast cancer, but cannot be completely used to prevent breast cancer.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    There is no vaccine that can prevent HER2-positive breast cancer, but researchers are working on one that might prevent HER2-positive breast cancer from recurring (coming back). In one study of 201 women who had been treated successfully for HER2-positive breast cancer, half the women got the vaccine. Two years later, the vaccinated women had a 43% lower risk of recurrence of HER2-positive breast cancer than the women who did not get vaccinated. However, more study is needed before it's certain that this vaccine is safe and effective.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Take these steps to lower your exposure to many toxins that put you at the highest risk for breast cancer:
    • Don't breathe in tobacco smoke, gasoline fumes, or car exhaust. They have the strongest links to breast cancer risk, so steer totally clear of other people's tobacco smoke. Avoid inhaling gas fumes when you fill up at the pump, and open garage or storage shed doors for a few minutes before going in. Avoid vehicle exhaust.
    • Keep and try to use outside organic solvents in paints, paint strippers, and glues. Air out fresh dry cleaning in the garage or on a porch before bringing it in. Try to find a "green" dry cleaner that doesn't use trichloroethylene or perchloroethylene; both solvents are health worries. If solvents are reported in your local water supply, add a carbon filter to your taps.
    • Sidestep hormone disturbers. The most famous one, BPA, is linked to a protein found in up to 30% of women with breast cancer. Fortunately, BPA has been removed from virtually all hard plastic bottles, glasses, and pitchers, but most canned foods still come in cans lined with BPA-laced material. Also, most thermal receipts from such places as fast-food restaurants and gas stations are BPA-laden. No widely available substitute has been found for can liners or receipts, but the hunt is on. Meanwhile, try to buy fresh or frozen foods, look for BPA-free cans, and don't take thermal receipts if you don't need. If you do, wash your hands before touching food.
    • Be choosy about personal-care and household products. There's plenty of carcinogen controversy about certain chemicals in cosmetics, soaps, shampoos, and more. The Environmental Working Group has a cosmetics database of worry-free products, and Green Seal is one good guide to choosing nontoxic cleaners (try baking soda and vinegar, too).
    It's not just about toxins. To really cut breast cancer risk, keep your weight healthy and your waist under 33 inches. Stay active. Stick to one drink daily (don't drink if you're at above-average risk). Consider hormone replacement therapy for tough menopausal symptoms if you're not at extra risk for breast cancer and heart disease. We believe that taking bioidentical estrogen, micronized progesterone, and two low-dose aspirin daily both cools hot flashes and lowers breast cancer odds. Even without menopausal issues, talk to your doc about low-dose aspirin to counter breast cancer, colon cancer, and stroke. Take aspirin with half a glass of warm water before and after.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Limiting your consumption of energy-dense foods and sugary drinks will lower your risk of breast cancer recurrence. Consider doing the following:
    • Limit intake of processed/high-fat carbohydrates such as pastries, doughnuts, cakes, cookies and sweet rolls.
    • Limit sugary drinks such as regular soda and sweetened beverages. A better choice is water or unsweetened drinks.
    • Eat smaller portions.
    • Be aware that something that is low-fat or nonfat does not mean it's low-calorie. Low-fat cakes, cookies and similar foods are often high in calories.
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    If you are at high risk for breast cancer you may consider risk-reducing breast surgery (prophylactic breast surgery). Once a patient's risk has been defined by an assessment, which may or may not include gene testing, the decision to proceed with risk-reducing breast surgery depends upon a number of factors, including the annualized risk of developing breast cancer, the desire to breastfeed, family planning, work demands, or other life events, and the desire to take steps to reduce risk. BRCA breast cancer gene carriers or other high-risk patients need to be followed closely during their decision making with physical examinations, mammograms, and MRIs until if and when they wish to intervene. Most clinicians recommend intervening when the patient is comfortable in doing so, preferably before ages 35 to 40. Risk-reducing surgery is not recommended for patients with a low or average risk.
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    A Diagnostic Radiology, answered on behalf of
    3-D mammograms, also known as Breast Tomosynthesis, can be performed on all patients. It however has the most benefit in the women with the denser types of breast tissue. Breast Density with Category C and D are the heterogeneously dense and extremely dense breast tissues respectively and would be expected to benefit most from 3-D mammograms.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    When the cells look suspicious on a film, the radiologist makes a recommendation that a sample of tissue be removed using a tiny needle (biopsy). The tissue is fixed across a glass slide to be examined under a microscope by a pathologist who will generate a report on the tumor's structural features.

     

    Types of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) cells:

    • cribform - open spaced gaps between cells

    • comedeo - containing a center of dead cells

    • papillary – fingerlike

    • solid

    • combination

     

    The pathologist will classify DCIS as high, intermediate, or low-grade. Some combinations are considered more aggressive.

     

     


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Do the following to limit intake of red meat and avoid processed meat -- you will reduce your breast cancer recurrence risk and gain other health benefits in your diet:
    • Vary your protein food choices by adding legumes, such as beans, lentils and chickpeas, which are a great source of fiber and naturally low in fat.
    • Include lean meats such as chicken breast, turkey and fish. A sensible serving portion is 3 to 4 ounces, which is about the size of a deck of cards.
    • Limit consumption of red meats.
    • Good choices of fish are Alaskan salmon, herring, sardines, black cod (sablefish) and tuna. These are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for the immune system and heart.
    • Eat processed meats sparingly since they contain nitrates, which contribute to carcinogens. Nitrates or nitrites are used in smoked, salted or pickled foods.
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    Ductal lavage stratifies risk among patients at high-risk for developing breast cancer. At present, tumors that begin in the milk duct are not typically discovered until they can be seen on a mammogram or sonogram. With ductal lavage, fluid is painlessly withdrawn from the milk ducts and examined by pathologists for abnormal or suspicious cells. Depending on the results of this analysis, a patient might be put on a high-risk monitoring program.