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Hepatitis C Myths

Hepatitis C can be difficult to understand because of its stigma and silent symptoms. Find out the truth about signs, risks and treatment.

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Hepatitis C Myths
Hepatitis C Myths
Question 1 of 15 Correct

About how many people in the U.S. have chronic hepatitis C?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 2.7 to 3.9 million people in the U.S. are living with a chronic hep C infection.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 2 of 15 Correct

Which generation is most likely to have hep C?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: While researchers aren't quite sure why, people born from 1945 to 1965 are five times as likely as others to have hep C. All baby boomers should be tested for the virus. The FDA has approved a hepatitis C antibody test kit that you can buy without a prescription and use at home. If your home test is positive, you should follow up with your doctor for further testing.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 3 of 15 Correct

Hep C is mostly spread through:

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Hep C is mostly spread through exposure to infected blood. Some people, like baby boomers, may have been exposed before blood screening was available in 1992. The infection is rarely spread through other ways.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 4 of 15 Correct

True or false: Hep C is the deadliest infectious disease in the U.S.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: In 2013, hepatitis C caused more deaths than 60 other infectious diseases combined—including HIV, tuberculosis and pneumococcal disease.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 5 of 15 Correct

What's the most common way to get hep C?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Hep C is usually spread through large or repeated exposures to infected blood, such as receiving a blood donation or organ donation before 1992 or using injection drugs. It's possible to pass the virus through sex or personal items that might contain blood, but this is rare. However, to be cautious, you shouldn't share personal items like toothbrushes and razors with someone who has hep C.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 6 of 15 Correct

If you have hep C, you'll get cirrhosis.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Up to 20% of people with hep C end up developing cirrhosis, which is scarring of the liver. Drinking alcohol and being overweight can raise that risk. But successful treatment of hep C can prevent it or slow it down.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 7 of 15 Correct

How many people are infected with both hep C and HIV at the same time?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: About 2.3 million people worldwide have both hep C and HIV. Having both viruses can affect treatment, so people with hep C should be tested for HIV and other infections so they can get the right care they need.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 8 of 15 Correct

What are some early signs of liver damage?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: You can have liver damage and not have any major symptoms. Early symptoms may include fatigue, jaundice, nausea, vomiting or loss of appetite. As liver damage gets worse, it can lead to more serious problems, like painful swelling in the legs and bruising and bleeding easily.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 9 of 15 Correct

True or false: Chronic hep C can clear up on its own.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Acute hep C can go away on its own without treatment for about 15-25% of people. But it's much more common for the acute infection to become chronic. With chronic hep C, your immune system can't fight the virus without the help of medicine. If left untreated, chronic hep C will get worse and may lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and even death.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 10 of 15 Correct

What's the cure rate for new hep C treatments?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: One of the best things about new hep C treatments is that they have cure rates over 90%! A person's chances of being cured depends on whether they've tried treatment before. But most people are able to clear the hep C virus from their bodies with the latest options.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 11 of 15 Correct

What are some common side effects of old interferon and ribavirin treatments?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Other side effects include depression, poor appetite, dry mouth, cough, shortness of breath, hair loss and brittle nails. In the past, people with hep C had a hard time sticking with treatment because of the side effects. Now, new treatments have far fewer and less severe side effects (plus a shorter treatment time).

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 12 of 15 Correct

What's the most common side effect of new direct-acting antiviral treatment?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Thankfully, with new hep C treatments, side effects are usually very mild and sometimes aren't even noticed. This makes getting cured even easier.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 13 of 15 Correct

Because hep C doesn't have a lot of symptoms, you don't need any treatment.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Just because you can't feel liver damage doesn't mean it's not happening. If you wait to get treated until you have symptoms, you're waiting for the virus to start attacking your liver. Treatment rules for hepatitis C have changed a lot recently—and are still changing—so it's best to discuss treatment with your doctor to see if it's right for you.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 14 of 15 Correct

True or false: If you have hep C, you should never drink alcohol.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: There's no safe amount of alcohol to drink with hep C, so it's best to skip it altogether. Any alcohol may further damage your liver, possibly leading to cirrhosis or even liver cancer.

Hepatitis C Myths
Question 15 of 15 Correct

Which factors are important to staying healthy with hep C?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: While hep C directly attacks your liver, the disease can also affect your entire health and wellbeing. That's why it's important to eat well, exercise regularly and look after your mental health. Having hep C isn't the life sentence it used to be and finding ways to cope can help people stay on track toward a healthy life after being cured.

Hepatitis C Myths
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