Breathing Exercises

Breathing Exercises

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    A , Orthopedic Surgery, answered
    You have been doing this since before you can remember, yet many people hold their breath while they are exercising or breathe so inefficiently they add more work to their workout. Simply breathe in through your nose and out through your mouth in a long, controlled flow. When you are exerting energy, such as pushing, pulling, or lifting, you exhale. When you are relaxing the move or lowering the weight, you inhale.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered

    The best way to get past the crosses that you've unwittingly decided to bear is by breathing. It's that simple. When we practice breathing, we increase our ability to enjoy life.

    What deep breathing does is retrain your nervous system to tolerate a higher charge of energy. If you practice it with any sort of regularity, you will find that you can feel good practically all the time. It'll be the crosses that don't feel natural. That's why most spiritual traditions of the world encourage their devotees to practice breathing. People's faiths are strengthened when they feel good.

    Experts tell us we could be breathing in seventeen pints of air per breath. Most of us settle for a measly two or three. Now, I don't know about you, but if somebody gave me the choice of one or two chocolate chip cookies or seventeen chocolate chip cookies, especially with the guarantee that the more I ate, the more weight I'd lose, I'd go for the seventeen. Go for the breath.

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    Breathing deeply will help prevent a respiratory infection following knee replacement surgery. Take deep breaths every hour until you are back to your usual level of activity. Use a spirometer if you were given one in the hospital.
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    A answered

    The biggest beauty thief and ager of all is the stress our minds try to endure day in and day out.

    A classic sign of the stress response is shallow, crazy-fast breathing. That’s why the opposite—deep, slow breathing—is such an effective way to calm yourself down. It can help you halt a stress reaction, or at least control it. Plus, it shifts the body’s balance of carbon dioxide-to-oxygen in favor of energizing oxygen. Remember, carbon dioxide is a waste product, whereas your cells and systems need a constant supply of fresh oxygen to stay alive and work efficiently. Oxygen is arguably the most vital nutrient for the body; we would die within minutes without it. The integrity of the brain, nerves, glands, and internal organs depends on oxygen, and any shortage in supply will have a profound impact on the entire body—inside and out.

    The lymphatic system, too, gets a serious boost from deep breathing. Lymph is a clear fluid filled with immune cells that moves around the body in a series of vessels. It delivers nutrients and collects cellular waste while helping to destroy pathogens, including those that can downgrade your skin health. The deeper you breathe, the more you can achieve this effect. While the heart is the pump for the vascular system, the lymphatic system has no built-in pump, so it relies on your breathing and physical movement to get around the body. It has long been known that exercise stimulates this movement of lymphatic fluid, but the role of breathing wasn’t entirely recognized until scientists found a way to photograph lymph flow. This is how they observed that deep breathing causes the lymph to gush through the lymphatic vessels.

    It’s empowering to know that something as simple (and free) as breathing can be a powerful tool to build beauty and sustain health.

    From The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You by Amy Wechsler.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Breathing is something we don't think about very much because it's automatic, but it is actually a very important component of any exercise routine. If you have nothing to drink, you can survive for several days. If you have nothing to eat, you can survive for several weeks. But if you don't have oxygen, you can't survive for more than a few minutes. One of the most common mistakes people make while exercising is that they don't breathe correctly or they don't breathe at all. This can be the source of fatigue and overexertion. And this can result in shortness of breath and a painful stitch in your side, which can cause you to stop exercising all together. And worse, it can cause your blood pressure to rise.

    When you breathe correctly, you get enough oxygen in your system to increase your circulation and get the blood flowing to every part of your body, including the brain. That makes it easier for the brain to release the neurotransmitters that boost both your mood and your energy. If you're breathing properly during exercise, you will probably make an audible grunting or whooshing noise as you breathe in and out.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered

    Pranic breathing delivers tremendous physiological and energetic benefits. The primary physiological benefits are:

    -improved functioning of your waste-removal system;
    -improved functioning of your cardiovascular system;
    -a stronger, more supple diaphragm, which is good for your whole body and mind.

    The primary energetic benefits include:

    -an increased capacity for generating high-quality prana;
    -indirect clearing of negative emotions, traumas, and limiting beliefs;
    -an increase in the size of your spiritual cord. (Your spiritual cord is a thread that attaches your crown chakra to your higher self or soul. It is also the primary valve through which congested or dirty prana is expelled from the energy body and fresh prana is drawn into the energy body. Dirty prana, however, in addition to contaminating your overall energetic body, shrinks the diameter of your spiritual cord because it clogs this valve. Pranic breathing draws in a great amount of high-quality prana, which cleans out this valve and expands the size of your spiritual cord.)
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    Your sympathetic nervous system is the part of your wiring that is sensitive to stress and anxiety, controlling your fight-or-flight response and those oft-damaging spikes in the stress hormones, cortisol and adrenaline. Chronic stress burns through your body’s nutrients and destabilizes your brain and hormonal chemistry.

    Depression, muscle tension and pain, insulin sensitivity, gastrointestinal issues, and insomnia, among scores of other conditions, are all related to a sympathetic nervous system sick and tired of working overtime. The time has come to give it a rest and bring in new shift work. What counteracts this mechanism? The parasympathetic nervous system, which can trigger a bona fide relaxation response. And deep breathing is the quickest means of getting these two systems to communicate, flicking the switch from high alert to low in a matter of seconds as your heart rate slows, muscles relax, and blood pressure lowers.

    From The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You by Amy Wechsler.

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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered

    The whole point of breathing is to learn to trust yourself, trust your body. Right now, you think of your body as a willful child that you must control, that you must keep very close tabs on.

    As you breathe, keep paying attention to your body and notice its divinity. If you persist in seeing it as a big bag of lumpy flesh, ask yourself, "What investment do I have in staying lumpy?" And then, as you breathe into the vision, watch while it floats off into space like the helium balloon that you bought for your daughter.

    Now that that vision, thankfully, is gone, tell yourself this. My body is as smart as the dickens and it knows what to do without my help. Keep telling yourself that, if you'll just let it, your body will get rid of the weight without prompting of any kind from you.  When you refuse to work with your body by keeping tabs and counting calories you refuse to let your body change.

    Nobody bothered to mention that our bodies can regulate and heal themselves. Nowhere were we taught that our inner feelings and sensations are signals. On the contrary, we were taught to ignore these inner signals. Breathing will help you find yourself. It's the essential component. It will free you from the grasp of your little mind.

    When you breathe, you'll also get in touch with the root problems that caused the weight in the first place. Now granted, such issues as self-protection, fear, and lack of discipline might not be the most pleasant emotions to face up to on a sunny Sunday afternoon. In fact, they are so painful that you may just need a bag of chocolate chip cookies to comfort yourself.

    But by breathing, you can clear those feelings out of your body for good. Instead of making them disappear by stuffing them back down into your body, breathing can help free you from those feelings. Take a few big breaths into the physical sensation of any emotion and watch what happens. Many times, that's all it takes to move it out of your body. The unpleasantness of emotions comes from holding on to them like the ledge of a building you're about to fall off. When you participate with them, by breathing with them, you can rid yourself of them forever.

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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered

    The main purpose of breathing is not to move air, but to move energy.

    The Chinese have known about this vital human energy for centuries. To this day, the Chinese believe that all illness is caused by some blockage in the chi. Millions of them (and I hasten to point out that you don't see many fat Chinese) arise at dawn morning after morning to practice " Qi Gong," a form of exercise that focuses on breathing. The Indian yogis had a different name for it (prana), but it's basically the same thing. Energy and the key to harnessing it is your breath.

    You have this incredibly powerful force and you're not using it. You're not capitalizing on this almighty life force that's certainly a lot bigger than your wimpy weight problem. The other thing you should understand is that your body itself is energy. A lot of us believe our bodies are static matter, frozen statues. But physicists tell us it just ain't so. Our bodies are rivers of energy -- constantly changing, continuously flowing.

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    A , Neurology, answered
    When you hold back tears, tiptoe through a fearful situation, or try to keep pain at bay, you unconsciously hold your breath or breathe irregularly. Deep breathing is a natural, simple way to counter this tendency. It eases stress while you do it. And, when practiced regularly, it has proven health benefits.

    When you breathe deeply, air coming in through your nose fully fills your lungs. You'll notice that it makes your lower belly rise, too. That happens because the diaphragm—a strong sheet of muscle that divides the chest from the abdomen—drops downward as you breathe in. This muscle pulls your lungs downward when it descends. It also presses against abdominal organs to make room for your lungs to expand as they fill with air. As you breathe out, your diaphragm pushes back upward against your lungs, helping your lungs expel carbon dioxide.

    Shallow breathing—especially the fast, panicky shallow breathing called hyperventilation—can make you feel quite anxious. Deep breathing encourages full oxygen exchange—that is, the beneficial trade of incoming oxygen for outgoing carbon dioxide. This type of breathing slows your heartbeat and can lower or stabilize blood pressure. Deep breathing is the foundation of many stress-relief techniques, including breath focus.
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