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What is amputation?

Removal of part or all of a body part, except for organs in the body. It usually takes place during surgery in a hospital operating room. It is done because of injury to the body part or problems from diabetes, hardening of the arteries, or any other illness that impairs blood circulation. It is also done to prevent the spread of bone cancer. Many amputees are able to be fitted with an artificial limb.

This answer is based on source information from the National Women's Health Information Center.

Amputation is the removal of all or part of a limb. Limbs may be amputated for a few reasons: they may be affecting your health due to a tumor or an infection, or they may be causing you severe pain without being functional. Most amputations are the result of a serious injury, such as from a car crash, or a disease, such as cancer or atherosclerosis. Amputation is a last-resort treatment option. Before considering amputation, a doctor will determine whether the limb in question can be saved.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.