Physical Disabilities

Physical Disabilities

Physical Disabilities
Physical disabilities can be sensory, where there are problems with sight, hearing or speech, or they may impair motor function, so that movement is restricted or imprecise. Injuries may cause a disability, and disease such as a heart condition may also make normal exertion impossible. Some disabilities start at birth - congenital disabilities. Others are acquired during life. If you have a disability, it is almost certain that there are many others who do also. Most conditions have support groups or associations that have grown up relating to the problem. These groups may offer specialized help to minimize the effect of the condition.

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    People with paraplegia who engage in adaptive scuba diving have little or no ability to kick in order to maintain their position in the water. This is why it is important that they master their buoyancy. Adaptive divers need to understand the various techniques and tools that can help them safely and effectively control buoyancy despite the inability to use foot fins. Note that a mobility-impaired diver who is a complete paraplegic will have no sensation or movement below the level of the injury, where an incomplete paraplegic may have varying degrees of movement, sensation and the ability to ambulate or walk.

    There are many variations of arm or leg impairments, so it’s important to assess the mobility of the individual early on to determine the level of assistance, if any, needed.
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    Mobility impairments cannot be prevented completely, but there are some steps you can take to help lower your chances of contracting the ailments that can cause impaired mobility. For instance, you can get immunized against polio, and you can help lower your risk of diabetes and stroke by living a healthy lifestyle. Avoiding recklessness and taking proper safety precautions during physical activity can reduce your chance of suffering a debilitating injury. Avoiding physically stressful, repetitive activities can help prevent arthritis. Of course, there are some incidents that cannot be foreseen, like an auto accident, and there are diseases like muscular dystrophy and multiple sclerosis for which there is no known prevention.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    To be human is to have a sore back. By the time we reach age 50, 9 out of 10 of us will have experienced back pain, the leading cause of disability in people under 45. Doctors prescribe everything from acupuncture to surgery to bring us relief, and as a society, we spend the same amount of money trying to cure back pain as we do cancer.



    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    After mastering daily activities using your prosthesis, you may wonder if you can try some new skills. Many healthy people use their prosthetics to work physically challenging jobs, or enjoy sports, mountain climbing, and triathlons. Work with your prosthetics team if you would like to learn how to run or do other new activities using your prosthesis. Your prosthetist may be able to recommend a special prosthesis designed especially for that activity.

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    If your child has impaired mobility, you should tell their school. In fact, you might want to inspect the school's facilities and discuss with the staff any accessibility issues your child might encounter. This is especially relevant if your child needs a wheelchair, crutches, or other physical aid to get around. Classrooms accommodations that might help your child include wheelchair ramps, wide aisles, elevators, computers with specially designed keyboards and speech recognition technology, and adjustable tables. Furthermore, the staff's awareness of your child's condition will help make them more prepared in case complications arise that require attention.

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    Mobility impairments cause difficulty in movement, so it is often apparent that something is physically wrong. If you or your child have persistent problems with mobility, you should visit a doctor. Depending on the cause of the mobility impairment, a physical exam might be the only test needed to diagnose the condition. In other cases, various other tests might be used, including blood tests for illnesses or x-rays for broken bones.

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    Paraplegia is an impairment in motor or sensory function of the lower extremities that affect and limit a person’s use of his or her legs; quadriplegia (tetraplegia) is similar to paraplegia except that it affects both the use of a person’s upper and lower extremities.

    Paraplegia is often the result of spinal cord injury or a congenital condition such as spina bifida, which affects the neural elements of the spinal canal. The term “broken back” is not a good description of a spinal cord injury since the injury is to the cord itself and not to the bony prominences that make up the spine.

    The individual presenting incomplete quadriplegia may have such mild impairments to his arms and legs that it’s almost not noticeable. However, such individuals will have different levels of impairments with sensation, strength, mobility and reflexes. A complete quadriplegic cannot move his or her arms or legs at all. There are many variations of arm or leg impairments.
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    Prosthetic limbs have three basic parts. Here is a description of those parts:

    • The internal frame, or skeleton, of a prosthetic limb is called the pylon. It has traditionally been formed of metal rods, as it must provide structural support. Recently, however, the pylons have been formed from lighter carbon-fiber composites. Sometimes the pylons are enclosed by a cover, which typically is made from a foam-like material. This cover can be shaped and colored to match the skin tone of the recipient, to make the prosthetic limb look more lifelike.
    • The socket is the part of the prosthetic device that connects to the patient's residual limb or limb stump. Because it transmits forces from the prosthetic limb to the patient's body, the socket must be meticulously fitted to avoid causing irritation or damage to skin or underlying tissues. Typically, a soft liner is situated within the interior of the socket. A patient also might a layer of one or more prosthetic socks to achieve a snug fit.
    • The suspension system keeps the prosthetic limb attached to the body. This mechanism can come in several forms. For instance, in a harness system -- straps, belts or sleeves are used to attach the prosthetic device. In some types of amputations, however, the prosthetic can stay attached simply by a good fit around the shape of the residual limb. A very common type of suspension mechanism relies on the use of suction. In this scenario, the prosthetic limb fits onto the residual limb and is kept in place by an airtight seal.
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    If you have trouble walking with a traditional cane but need support when you walk, try using a walking stick that resembles a shepherd’s staff. The difference is that you hold the staff in front of you, and your elbow is bent at a 90-degree angle. The staff also helps you stand up straighter when your back muscles are weak. To see if walking with a staff helps you, get a broom or mop, cut the handle off and put a rubber crutch protector on the end that touches the floor.
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    If you use a cane with a small golf club-type protrusion at the bottom, it can make walking easier because it tricks your mind into thinking you’re stepping over something. Take a collapsible cane with you when you walk. When you freeze, assemble the cane and gently kick the end near the floor.