Types Of Exercise

Types Of Exercise

Types Of Exercise

Exercise provides many health benefits - from fitness to increased physical and mental energy. In order to prepare yourself for a exercise routine, you need to research which exercise is right for you and how to fit a new exercise program into your daily schedule.

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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Healthcare, answered
    If you think you’re too old to lift weights, the latest findings conclude that this is not true. In a revealing study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, researchers studied 60 healthy men and women between the ages of 60 and 83 who engaged in either high intensity resistance training using machines or low-intensity resistance training. In addition, a control group participated that did not change their lifestyle habits. After six months, the high intensity-training group made significant improvement in bone density measurements -- where the thighbone meets the hip. This is the area (the femoral neck) where serious or even deadly fractures occur in older adults. In this study, researchers believed that leg presses, overhead presses, and certain back strengthening exercises had the most impact on boosting bone density.
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    One thing I wanted to mention as well is if you meet with a fitness professional and they do not ask you if you have at least met with a doctor dont just turn away, run the other way.

    This does not mean that you have to meet with a doctor but a fitness professional should at least ask if you have met with a doctor or encourage you to do so if you are just beginning and exercise program.

    All qualified fitness professionals are taught to only be trainers and not practice outside their scope so it is incredibly important for a fitness professional for their potential client to have met with a doctor to know they are cleared for activity or what limitations may exist.  Same holds true for someone who is currently injured or coming off an injury, the fitness professional should request information from the doctor or therapist so they can properly guide you through exercise.

    Be very leary of a fitness professional if they at least do not ask if you have seen a physician before meeting with them.

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    Exercise after surgery is only recommended with a physicians release. You may want to see a physical therapist first depending upon what type of surgery you had. Even then you will want to take it easy and do some very basic type exercises to get your body reconditioned.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of

    Consulting with a doctor before joining an exercise program is always a good idea, especially if you have a family history of heart attack or sudden cardiac death in a close relative at an age under 60 years, high blood pressure, diabetes or several other risk factors for heart disease.

    If you are able to walk briskly and climb a flight of stairs without difficulty with shortness of breath or chest discomfort, and are at low risk for heart disease, you may not need to consult a doctor before exercising - but it certainly doesn't hurt.

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    A , Fitness, answered

    There is a good chance you are ready for physical activity at any time. A fitness assessment performed by your trainer after you have been cleared for exercise by your doctor is a good place to start.

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    Yes, it’s important to get a yearly physical if you are planning on starting an exercise program. This will pre-screen you for any underlying conditions that you may not be aware of and could potentially be fatal if left unchecked.
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    Yes, always consult your doctor before beginning an exercise program, especially if you are taking any medication, have been diagnosed with a chronic disease (high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis etc.) or suffer from joint pain. Your doctor can help suggest safe and reasonable exercises.

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    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    It depends on the severity of injury. There are many things you can do in terms of exercise that can not tax or exacerbate your injury. It would be wise to consult with a qualfied health practitioner to determine the extent of your injury. You should then see an injury specialist to hopefully help rehabilitate your injury as well as provide proper training programs to improve your injury as well as train without causing further injury.
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    Prior to exercise consider the following:

    • What is your current fitness level?  Are you active or are you inactive?
    • Do you have any health history to be concerned with, i.e. high blood pressure, high cholesterol?
    • Have you ever had an injury before?  A broken bone, back pain, etc?
    • Have you ever exercised before?  If not, consider seeking help from a certified professional so you do not injury yourself.

    These questions are just a few to ask but will assist you prior to starting exercise.  The best advice I can give would be to meet with a trainer to get some advice.  If you do not belong to a fitness center then be sure to purchase a pair of shoes with good support and go out and start walking.  As you build your fitness level and get into a routine then you will be able to gage your fitness level a little better and be able to figure out how hard you can push yourself.

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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of
    For most people physical activity should not pose any problem or hazard. PAR-Q has been designed to identify the small number of adults for whom physical activity might be inappropriate or those who should have medical advice concerning the type of activity most suitable for them.

    Common sense is your best guide in answering these few questions. Please read them carefully and check the yes or no opposite the question if it applies to you.

    YES NO
    • Has your doctor ever said you have heart trouble?
    • Do you frequently have pains in your heart and chest?
    • Do you often feel faint or have spells of severe dizziness?
    • Has a doctor ever said your blood pressure was too high?
    • Has your doctor ever told you that you have a bone or joint problem such as arthritis that has been aggravated by exercise, or might be made worse with exercise?
    • Is there a good physical reason not mentioned here why you should not follow an activity program even if you wanted to?
    • Are you over age 65 and not accustomed to vigorous exercise?
    If you answered YES to one or more questions...
    if you have not recently done so, consult with your personal physician by telephone or in person before increasing your physical activity and/or taking a fitness test.

    If you answered NO to all questions...
    If you answered PAR-Q accurately, you have reasonable assurance of your present suitability for an exercise test.  You should consider consulting with a qualified personal trainer to asssit you assessing your current fitness status and design a safe, individualized, and goal-specific fitness program for you.

    http://www.asaging.org/cdc/module6/phase6/Par-Q.pdf
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