Types Of Exercise

Types Of Exercise

Types Of Exercise

Exercise provides many health benefits - from fitness to increased physical and mental energy. In order to prepare yourself for a exercise routine, you need to research which exercise is right for you and how to fit a new exercise program into your daily schedule.

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    A Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered on behalf of
    Sudden or severe increases in blood pressure inside the eye can cause vessels to rupture, worsening retinopathy. If you have significant retinopathy, do not lift heavy weights because this will cause the pressure in those vessels to increase. You should also avoid contact sports because of the risk of retinal detachment. Aerobic physical activities are usually fine, but your doctor may recommend brisk walking rather than running or jogging because of the jarring that can occur, possibly causing the delicate retinal blood vessels to leak blood or fluid.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of

    Consulting with a doctor before joining an exercise program is always a good idea, especially if you have a family history of heart attack or sudden cardiac death in a close relative at an age under 60 years, high blood pressure, diabetes or several other risk factors for heart disease.

    If you are able to walk briskly and climb a flight of stairs without difficulty with shortness of breath or chest discomfort, and are at low risk for heart disease, you may not need to consult a doctor before exercising - but it certainly doesn't hurt.

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    A answered
    If you have diabetes, before you start an exercise program, be prepared. As you get ready to become more active, be sure you wear supportive and comfortable shoes and socks, keep your medical identification with you if you leave the house and carry water.

    Because activity can affect your blood glucose, check it regularly and be prepared to manage low blood glucose by taking food, such as granola bars, hard candies and glucose tablets. A diabetes educator can help you figure out how to manage these issues, as well as what type of activity fits your lifestyle and how to best reach your goal.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Robin Miller - Exercise Blood Sugar

    A combination or aerobic exercise and gentle weight training can reduce blood sugar. Watch this video to learn more from Dr. Robin Miller about reducing blood sugar.

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    Yes, always consult your doctor before beginning an exercise program, especially if you are taking any medication, have been diagnosed with a chronic disease (high blood pressure, diabetes, osteoporosis etc.) or suffer from joint pain. Your doctor can help suggest safe and reasonable exercises.

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    Yes. Some medications can radically alter the response your body has to exercise. Always consult the professional who is prescribing any medication you are taking before starting your exercise program.

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    Strength training has shown to have significant positive effects on individuals with many types of chronic disease. Some studies show that strength training does help clients with MS, but the data is very limited. It is suggested to speak with your physician or qualified health care professional to discuss how strength training can help MS. Getting a checkup first allows you to start your weight training program with reassurance that there is little risk involved.
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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of
    For most people physical activity should not pose any problem or hazard. PAR-Q has been designed to identify the small number of adults for whom physical activity might be inappropriate or those who should have medical advice concerning the type of activity most suitable for them.

    Common sense is your best guide in answering these few questions. Please read them carefully and check the yes or no opposite the question if it applies to you.

    YES NO
    • Has your doctor ever said you have heart trouble?
    • Do you frequently have pains in your heart and chest?
    • Do you often feel faint or have spells of severe dizziness?
    • Has a doctor ever said your blood pressure was too high?
    • Has your doctor ever told you that you have a bone or joint problem such as arthritis that has been aggravated by exercise, or might be made worse with exercise?
    • Is there a good physical reason not mentioned here why you should not follow an activity program even if you wanted to?
    • Are you over age 65 and not accustomed to vigorous exercise?
    If you answered YES to one or more questions...
    if you have not recently done so, consult with your personal physician by telephone or in person before increasing your physical activity and/or taking a fitness test.

    If you answered NO to all questions...
    If you answered PAR-Q accurately, you have reasonable assurance of your present suitability for an exercise test.  You should consider consulting with a qualified personal trainer to asssit you assessing your current fitness status and design a safe, individualized, and goal-specific fitness program for you.

    http://www.asaging.org/cdc/module6/phase6/Par-Q.pdf
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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of
    I highly recommend that you get a coach to help assess your current fitness level and then design and individualized, goal-specifc exercise and nutrition plan to help you achieve your goals in the most efficient, safe and effective way possible.  Look for a NASM certified professional and/or a Nike SPARQ Trainer.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you have a health problem, you should incorporate physical activity into your life (although you'll want to do so under the guidance of your physician). In fact, if you have a health problem, you should especially start an activity program, because you stand to benefit the most. For those at higher risk of cardiovascular disease and other chronic illnesses, exercise makes their RealAge (physiologic age) disproportionately younger. The biggest benefit occurs if you start exercising before a major health problem, or, as I like to think of it, an aging event. However, it's never too late to start.
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