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What is the best position to hold my arms/hands when sprinting?

Any position is fine for your hands is good as long as they are calm. Rigid hand or finger positions drain energy that you should be using to propel your body. So avoid trying to make them perfect, just let your hands and fingers do what they would like as long as they are calm. Arms, on the other hand, are very important to proper running mechanics. For the start, use your arms as aggressively as possible. Big, strong, fast, and long are all adjectives used to describe suitable arm action at the start of a sprint. This gets your elbows driving back and provides balance as you establish an assertive forward lean. As you extend down the line, you want your arm action to be a little more controlled to help sustain your rhythm. Elbows are still driving backwards, but now you want your elbows to move into a 90º angle so that your hands stay below your nose or eye level. Sometimes thinking about getting your thumbs to your shoulders is a suitable cue to maintain this rhythmic arm action that promotes optimal output.

Arm action is important and complements the action of the legs when sprinting. Relaxed hands prevent wasting energy from making fits or other rigid hand positions. A good mental image to help think about proper arm motion is "throwing your hands back". The word throwing is important as it indicates how explosive the arm movement should be. As one arm goes backward, the opposite leg will drive forward. One other checkpoint is to ensure that your arm swing does not cross the midline of your body - your right arm should swing on the right side and not cross your chest to the left side. Establish and maintain elbows at about a 90-degree angle.

Proper arm mechanics can have noticeable results, specifically in sprinting where tenths and hundredths of a second can matter.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.