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How is chemotherapy for ovarian cancer given?

For most ovarian cancer patients, chemotherapy is an important part of treatment. Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy cancer cells and tumors in the body.

Many patients have received prior ovarian cancer chemotherapy treatments. Medical oncologists treat ovarian cancer with an aggressive approach, trying different chemotherapy drug combinations when standard therapy is not enough.

For the treatment of ovarian cancer, chemotherapy is typically given in the following ways:
  • Orally – by mouth.
  • Intravenously – through a vein.
  • Directly into the abdomen through a catheter – called intraperitoneal chemotherapy.
For many patients, a port to deliver chemotherapy is placed directly to the veins or tumor site, which minimizes discomfort for ongoing chemotherapy treatment.

A large number of women with recurrent ovarian cancer, for whom the standard chemotherapy regimen has not worked, require additional treatment.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.