Nutrition

Nutrition

Nutrition
Eating a variety of foods each day that are low in fat and calories ensures you get proper nutrition and nutrients like folate, magnesium and iron. Calcium, fiber, potassium and selenium are other nutrients essential for wellness, growth, development, cell repair and disease prevention. Colorful foods, such as fruits and vegetables, are often the richest sources of nutrients. Taking a multivitamin once daily is a good way to supplement your diet.

Recently Answered

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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    Although glutamine is often attributed to sports nutrition (to prevent muscle breakdown), it’s also an infamous gut-healer. It’s been shown to maintain the intestinal villi, which are the absorption surfaces of the gut. One study (though done on rats) showed substantial protection of glutamine against aspirin-induced stomach ulcers in both the active and healed stages.

    A similar study found that the early administration of glutamine to severe-burn patients prevented the complication of stress ulcers that commonly develop after extreme thermal injury. Glutamine at 400 mg four times a day for four weeks completely healed stomach ulcers in more than 90 percent of the patients taking it.

    Take 1000-5000 mg daily on an empty stomach, such as before bed, or add the powder to protein shakes. Decrease the dosage if you experience constipation, or increase the dosage to treat diarrhea (up to 10-20 grams per day can be used for this reason).
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The liver performs two phases of detoxification: Phase One (oxidation) and Phase Two (conjugation). In Phase Two, oxidized chemicals are combined with sulfur, specific amino acids, or organic acids, and then excreted in bile. The most important amino acids for Phase Two detoxification are cysteine and methionine.

    These two amino acids are the main dietary sources of sulfur, and are found in meat, fish, poultry, eggs and dairy products. Vegetarian sources of cysteine and methionine include nuts, seeds and beans. The usual adult recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of cysteine and methionine is 700 to 1000 mg per day, but is never fixed, because it fluctuates with the liver's burden of toxic compounds. The body's stores of these amino acids are depleted in the process of detoxification, so the greater the toxic stress, the more the body demands.
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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of
    D-Aspartic acid is one of the two forms of the amino acid called Aspartic acid (a non-essential amino acid and one of the two components of aspartame, an artificial sweetener). The naturally occurring form of Aspartic acid is L-Aspartic acid. It is mainly sold as a testosterone booster, although there is inconclusive research to support that it actually can increase testosterone. Possible side effects may include an increase in estrogen (if it actually does increase testosterone).
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You should ask your doctor or other health-care provider what to do if you miss a dose of tryptophan. Do not take more than recommended on the product label.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Do not take tryptophan (also called L-tryptophan) if you're pregnant. It can cause serious breathing problems for your fetus.

    Tryptophan was linked to the outbreak of a serious neurological condition that led to a number of deaths in 1989. It was temporarily banned. Although it is once again available, it is still considered possibly unsafe.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You do not need a prescription to take tryptophan in the form of a dietary supplement in the United States but you should talk with your doctor before doing so. Tryptophan, which is an amino acid that prompts the body to produce the neurotransmitter serotonin, has been linked in the past to life-threatening reactions, and it may also interact with other medications you're taking.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Tryptophan, sold in supplement form as L-tryptophan, is used to treat conditions such as depression, bipolar disorder, insomnia, migraine headaches, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PDD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and fibromyalgia. It works by prompting the production serotonin, a neurotransmitter that affects many body functions including mood, appetite and sleep.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You should call your doctor before you start taking tryptophan (also called L-tryptophan), to ask whether the supplement is safe for you to take. Tryptophan was linked to the outbreak of a serious neurological condition that led to a number of deaths in 1989. It was temporarily banned, and although it is once again available, it is still considered possibly unsafe.

    There is only preliminary evidence that tryptophan can help with some of the conditions people are most likely to take it for, including insomnia, depression and sleep apnea.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Tryptophan (also called L-tryptophan) can cause a number of side effects, including heartburn, stomach pain, gas, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, lightheadedness, dry mouth, blurred vision, loss of coordination, drowsiness and loss of appetite.

    Be especially on guard for side effects associated with eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, a serious, potentially fatal condition that has been seen only in people taking tryptophan. These include:
    • extreme muscle pain
    • severe fatigue
    • nerve abnormalities (loss of reflexes, numbness, weakness, tingling, burning pain especially at night)
    • shaking or twitching in your muscles
    • swelling anywhere, but especially in your hands or feet
    • a rash or patches of hard, dry skin
    • low fever
    • hair loss
    • irregular heartbeat
    • shortness of breath or coughing
    Seek medical care right away if you experience any of these symptoms.

    In 1989, more than 1,500 people in the United States came down with eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome, and 37 died. It is possible that the outbreak was caused by impurities in the product of a single manufacturer rather than by tryptophan itself, but this has not been proved. In 1990, tryptophan was temporarily banned, and although it is once again available, it is still considered possibly unsafe.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You can buy tryptophan in pill or powder form as L-tryptophan. L-tryptophan is an amino acid found naturally in protein sources. The body turns L-tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and then to serotonin, a neurotransmitter that affects mood, appetite and sleep, among other things.

    L-tryptophan supplements are controversial because of possible safety concerns. The Food and Drug Administration took L-tryptophan supplements off the market for a time in the 1990s, after they were linked to a life-threatening syndrome that caused muscle pain, nerve damage and widespread inflammation in the body. The reaction may have been caused by contaminated L-tryptophan supplements.

    You can also get tryptophan naturally by eating turkey, milk, chocolate, pumpkin, sunflower seeds and collard greens.