Nutrition

Nutrition

Nutrition
Eating a variety of foods each day that are low in fat and calories ensures you get proper nutrition and nutrients like folate, magnesium and iron. Calcium, fiber, potassium and selenium are other nutrients essential for wellness, growth, development, cell repair and disease prevention. Colorful foods, such as fruits and vegetables, are often the richest sources of nutrients. Taking a multivitamin once daily is a good way to supplement your diet.

Recently Answered

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    Methionine is one of nine essential amino acids, so called because they cannot be made by the human body and must be obtained through the diet. Sources of methionine include protein-rich foods such as beef, chicken, fish, liver, pork, cottage cheese, eggs, lentils, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and yogurt.

    Supplementary L-methionine has been used to treat symptoms of Parkinson's disease, insomnia, and severe acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol®) poisoning. In addition, increased dietary intake of methionine has been shown to reduce the risk of a specific type of brain and spinal cord birth defect known as neural tube defects (NTDs). More well-designed human studies are needed to determine if methionine is safe and effective for treating any medical condition.
    Very high doses of supplementary methionine have been shown to increase levels of the amino acid homocysteine. High homocysteine levels are a risk factor for heart disease. Some studies have suggested links between methionine and cancer, but more research is needed before firm conclusions can be made.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Adults (18 years and older):
    • The dietary reference intake recommendation for methionine and cysteine combined is 25 milligrams per gram of protein.
    • For acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol®) toxicity, 2.5 grams of methionine has been taken by mouth every four hours for four doses with good results when given within 10 hours after acetaminophen use.
    • For insomnia, 500 milligrams of methionine has been taken by mouth just before bedtime.
    • For Parkinson's disease, 5 grams of methionine has been taken by mouth daily for two weeks to six months.
    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Methionine may interact with anticancer herbs and supplements, foods containing large amounts of methionine (such as red meat and chicken), herbs and supplements that elevate homocysteine levels, and herbs and supplements that may damage the liver.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

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    Because methionine is an essential amino acid, hypersensitivity and allergy are unlikely.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Studies have shown that methionine contributes to the normal formation of the brain and spinal cord during pregnancy. Low levels of methionine during pregnancy may be, in part, responsible for a specific class of brain and spinal cord birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). A methionine-rich diet during pregnancy may help prevent neural tube defects. Further study is needed.

    Supplemental methionine is not indicated in breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Methionine may interact with anticancer agents (including cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil), agents that elevate homocysteine levels (including fenofibrate, niacin, metformin, antiseizure drugs, levodopa, and methotrexate), and agents that may damage the liver.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Glutamine may increase blood insulin levels, which may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar or raise insulin levels. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

    Glutamine may also interact with antibacterials, antidepressants, antidiarrheals, anti-inflammatory herbs and supplements, antioxidants and antioxidant-containing foods, antipsychotics, antiretroviral herbs and supplements, arginine, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (BHMB), branched-chain amino acids, carbohydrates, chemotherapeutic herbs and supplements, exercise performance herbs and supplements, fiber, fish, fructose, growth hormones, herbs and supplements for muscle wasting, immunostimulants, immunosuppressants, monosodium glutamate (MSG), narcotics, omega-3 fatty acids, ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate (OKG), probiotics and probiotic-containing foods, protein, protein-sparing herbs and supplements, weight-promoting herbs, supplements, and diets, and wound-healing herbs and supplements.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

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    Burns -- Evidence suggests that incorporation of glutamine into enteral feeding (tube feeding into the stomach or intestine) and intravenous feeding of burn patients offers benefit.

    Total parenteral nutrition (as adjunct during trauma or after surgery) -- Some evidence suggests that incorporation of glutamine into parenteral nutrition (feeding by tube into a vein or muscle) for trauma and postsurgical patients may offer benefit. However, further studies are needed before conclusions can be drawn.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Some evidence suggests that incorporation of glutamine into parenteral nutrition (feeding by tube into a vein or muscle) for trauma and postsurgical patients may offer benefit. However, further studies are needed before conclusions can be drawn.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    Although glutamine is often attributed to sports nutrition (to prevent muscle breakdown), it’s also an infamous gut-healer. It’s been shown to maintain the intestinal villi, which are the absorption surfaces of the gut. One study (though done on rats) showed substantial protection of glutamine against aspirin-induced stomach ulcers in both the active and healed stages.

    A similar study found that the early administration of glutamine to severe-burn patients prevented the complication of stress ulcers that commonly develop after extreme thermal injury. Glutamine at 400 mg four times a day for four weeks completely healed stomach ulcers in more than 90 percent of the patients taking it.

    Take 1000-5000 mg daily on an empty stomach, such as before bed, or add the powder to protein shakes. Decrease the dosage if you experience constipation, or increase the dosage to treat diarrhea (up to 10-20 grams per day can be used for this reason).