Living With Arthritis

Living With Arthritis

Living With Arthritis
When living with arthritis, daily activities like opening doors, climbing stairs and even getting out of bed can be difficult and painful due to joint inflammation. Exercise reduces pain and disability, partly because it stimulates the production of synovial fluid that lubricates the joints. Regular daily exercise also helps maintain a healthy weight and improve overall muscle tone and balance, both which lessen strain on the joints.

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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you have arthritis, a good exercise for your hands is just opening and closing your fist. Bring the fingers out so they're spread and then close them into a fist again. Anything that increases the motion in a slow, controlled fashion will help. 


     
    Another thing you can do for hand arthritis is to buy putties in different strengths. Just squeezing them will help you build up your hand strength.
     
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you have arthritis, you should exercise at a level that enables you to carry on a conversation while you're working out -- whether or not you actually have someone to talk to. That doesn't mean you should take it easy, but if you're totally out of breath when you're out walking or jogging, it's a good idea to slow down.
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you have arthritis you should exercise five times a week for half an hour. Adults, including adults with arthritis, should get two hours and 30 minutes a week of moderate-intensity activity. If you don't have time or you don’t feel up to an entire half hour at once, exercise in three, 10-minute blocks during the day: 10 minutes in the morning, 10 minutes at lunch and 10 minutes before you go to bed. 


     
    If you feel up to vigorous exercise, then aim for one hour and 15 minutes a week. And be sure to add in muscle-strengthening exercises and stretching about two days a week, which is especially important if you have arthritis. Muscle strengthening helps promote balance and stretching helps improve range of motion.

     
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    A answered
    Contrary to conventional wisdom, using a joint with arthritis may not lead to more damage. In fact, the opposite may be true. Not only does regular exercise help you maintain a healthy weight, it builds muscle, and strong muscles can protect your joints.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    How does diet affect arthritis?

    Diet can play a role in arthritis; there are certain foods that promote inflammation in the body, making arthritis symptoms worse. Watch as rheumatologist Natalie Azar, MD, discusses which foods fight inflammation, and which are more inflammatory.

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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Exercise can reduce arthritis pain. Physical activity reduces arthritis pain and improves function and mobility. It will also boost energy and mood, and improve the ability to sleep well. When people exercise regularly, their overall quality of life is going to go up.
     
    Think of physical activity as an arthritis pain reliever. In fact, one study has shown that walking can be just as effective at reducing knee pain as naproxen (Aleve) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin).
     
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you have arthritis and are overweight, you should lose weight. Getting your weight down can make a huge difference in how your joints feel. Start by aiming to take off five pounds, a goal that can be less overwhelming than 20 to 30 or more pounds. Then build on that success to keep losing more.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Drink tea, black or green, if you have arthritis. The notion that green tea is healthier than black tea has not been borne out by clinical trials in humans. Green tea may have anti-cancer effects, but black tea has a better track record in fighting inflammation. You need at least 3 cups a day, unless you're a smoker, in which case no amount of tea will work for you.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you have arthritis, don't worry about carrots. All the publicity given to the Glycemic Index of foods (the tendency for a food to raise blood sugar) has given carrots a bad rep. The carotenoids in carrots, anti-oxidants that create the orange color, and the fiber, make carrots an anti-inflammatory food. Carrots are more nutritious cooked than raw.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you have arthritis, eat fish 3 times a week, especially wild salmon, if it's available and affordable, but don't fry your fish; frying interferes with the benefits. You may want to consider supplementing your diet with the natural anti-inflammatory, fish oil. The amount of fish oil you need is not fixed; it varies from about a teaspoon (4000 milligrams) to a tablespoon (12,000 milligrams) each day, depending upon what else is in your diet. The more meat, poultry, egg yolk or dairy fat you eat, the greater your need for fish oil, because these foods contain arachidonic acid, a pro-inflammatory omega 6 fatty acid. The more you use vegetable oils other than extra-virgin olive oil, the more fish oil you need.