Living With Arthritis

Living With Arthritis

Living With Arthritis
When living with arthritis, daily activities like opening doors, climbing stairs and even getting out of bed can be difficult and painful due to joint inflammation. Exercise reduces pain and disability, partly because it stimulates the production of synovial fluid that lubricates the joints. Regular daily exercise also helps maintain a healthy weight and improve overall muscle tone and balance, both which lessen strain on the joints.

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    Exercise for people with arthritis is the same as for everyone else. It is recommended that you exercise for 30 to 60 minutes at moderate intensity 5 days per week.
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    A answered
    To deal with fatigue caused by arthritis, try the following:
    • Get extra rest by taking breaks or naps during the day and allowing time for a full night's sleep.
    • See your healthcare provider if you have trouble sleeping.
    • Prioritize your activities and do the most important ones first, when you have the most energy.
    • Pace yourself and don't overdo.
    • Set a time limit on shopping, and watch for places you can stop to get off your feet.
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you have arthritis, you should exercise at a level that enables you to carry on a conversation while you're working out -- whether or not you actually have someone to talk to. That doesn't mean you should take it easy, but if you're totally out of breath when you're out walking or jogging, it's a good idea to slow down.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    If you already have arthritis, exercise will reduce the pain and disability, partly because it stimulates the production of synovial fluid that lubricates the joints. There's another good reason to stay active! When you have arthritis, you will have less pain if you move your joints frequently; if you are sedentary, your joints will become stiff and even more painful. You may need to switch to forms of exercise that are easier on the joints, such as swimming or bike riding. Regular daily exercise is also recommended in arthritis because it improves overall muscle tone and balance and thus helps remove strain on the joints.

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    Learning techniques to reduce pain and limitations can be beneficial to people with arthritis and other chronic diseases. Self-management education programs, such as the Chronic Disease Self Management Program (CDSMP), can help you develop the skills and confidence to manage multiple chronic conditions and live well each day in spite of the limitations they cause. Participants in these programs have learned to manage pain and fatigue, and also reduce frustration or worry about their health. Effective, arthritis-focused options such as the Arthritis Self Management Program (ASMP) also are available. Interactive workshops are low cost (about $25-$35) and available in communities across the country.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
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    The most important thing to know about caring for someone with arthritis is to be sensitive to the patient's pain and frustration. It can be frustrating for a patient, especially if they were a very active individual before the onset of arthritis, to have movement restricted and to be unable to enjoy activities they once loved. Take it one day at a time, encourage the patient, and let them know you are there to help them with both physical and emotional needs. Help them lead a healthy lifestyle by encouraging a nutritious diet, regular exercise, and whatever solutions help them manage their individual symptoms.

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    A floor bridge, plank, single-leg balance, ball squat, and small box step-up are all great for you. These exercises help to strengthen your core (abdominals and low back muscles) and/or gluteals (butt muscles). These exercises are low impact, and low-impact exercises are typically safer for your joints. In addition to these exercises, try to stay relatively active (such as going for short walks) and avoid extended periods of inactivity (sitting). Staying active helps your joints stay strong and pliable. Too much sitting can stiffen your joints and increase arthritis pain.

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    With any stretch you perform use caution and stretch only within a range of motion that is always pain free. The following stretches should be very effective for you to perform-hip flexor (standing), inner thigh (seated), and calf complex. With each stretch is important to hold the stretch for 30 seconds and repeat.

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    There are several safe and comfortable exercises for individuals who suffer from arthritis. Water-based exercises help alleviate pressure on the knees and offer a good amount of resistance and cardiorespiratory conditioning. If water is not an ideal solution for you, try lower impact exercises using low to moderate weight and continuous support for your knees like ball squats and ball bridges. To strengthen your hips and alleviate pressure on your knees side-to-side tube walking is a good alternative. These exercises, if done correctly, place minimal stress on the knees and will help strengthen your hips and legs. When performing any of these exercises, make sure your knee stays in line with your toes during the movement.

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    A Geriatrics Nursing, answered on behalf of

    According to Anderssen, Thorstensson, Roos, Petersson, Heinegard, and Saxne (2006) exercise is a treatment recommended for osteoarthritis to strengthen joint stability and reduce pain. A new study was developed to monitor tissue proteins of the knee joint in groups of patients suffering from osteoarthritis and recognize that mild walking can alter the proteins, suggesting a benefit to the patient. The study recommends further testing and research, but recognizes that a relationship exists between exercise and arthritis.

    On a personal level, I have had both of my knees replaced and can attest that exercise has been my saving grace before and after my replacement surgery. Even though pain can get in the way of the emotional want to be active, the overall outcome can greatly decrease arthritis pain on the knee joint and increase physical mobility. Although I could not avoid knee replacement surgery, I have still found that exercise minimizes my pain and increases mobility and I believe it will always be a staple in my existence to ensure a more positive quality of life.

    Anderssen, M., Thorstensson, C., Roos, E., Petersson, I., Heinegard, D., & Saxne, T. (2006). Serum levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) increase temporarily after physical exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis. BMC Musculoskeletel Disorders, 7(98), 1-8. Retrieved from ESBSCOhost database.

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