HPV

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  • 4 Answers
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    A Pediatrics, answered on behalf of

    Some strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV) cause cancer and some strains cause genital warts. Hopefully, you will not have to experience either of these.

    The cancer causing strains of HPV are found in about 95% of cervical cancer and cause the death of too many women each year. In men, the risk of penile and anal cancers are greatly increased. Please practice safe sex and protect yourself.

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  • 1 Answer
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    If you haven't already had your daughter or son vaccinated for the human papillomavirus (HPV), it's not too late. Ask your child's doctor about getting the HPV vaccine. Take advantage of any visit to the doctor -- such as an annual health checkup or physicals for sports, camp or college -- to ask the doctor about what shots your preteens and teens need.

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  • 17 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most commonly transmitted STD. As many as 80 percent of sexually active people are infected with the virus. Surprisingly little is ever said about this disease. For a long time, the virus was believed to be benign, but now we know it substantially increases the risk of cervical cancer, thus aging the immune system. This STD also produces the chronic inflammation and chronic infections that age the arteries. Some strains cause small genital growths or warts that can be uncomfortable; these can easily be removed. If you have had more than two sex partners in your lifetime, or if your partner has had more than two sex partners, chances are you have been exposed to the virus. In general, human papillomavirus infection doesn't do much, and there are no treatments. But once you have it, you have it.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Gynecologic Oncology, answered
    When should women start being tested for human papillomavirus (HPV)?

    Women over the age of 30 should be screened annually for human papillomavirus (HPV), says Elizabeth Poynor, MD, PhD, a gynecologist-oncologist in New York City. In this video, she explains why you should get the test.


  • 1 Answer
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    A , Health Education, answered

    Only if you are over 30 years old. If you want to space out your Pap testing to every 5 years, then ask your doctor to use both the HPV and Pap test. If both tests are negative/normal, then your chances of getting a precancerous lesion in the next 5 years is less than 5 per 1000.

  • 2 Answers
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    Yes. There are many types of HPV, so you can get HPV again.
    This answer is based on the source infromation from the National Women's Health Information Center
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    For men, exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV) seems to have little effect, except that exposure is related to rare bladder tumors and rare penile cancers. Men who have been exposed should be sure not to dismiss early warning signs of bladder cancer, such as small amounts of blood in the urine, and should get urine tests. In addition, men who have been exposed can get chronic infections from the virus that are discomforting or that age the arteries. Men who have been exposed can also transmit the virus to their partners, and they can develop growths or warts, sometimes inside the urethra, that cause discomfort.

    Recent studies show that the virus may be implicated in some anal and rectal cancers, as well as some oral cancers.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Health Education, answered
    Pap testing looks at the shape of the cell nucleus compared to the whole skin cell from your cervix. Human papillomavirus (HPV) that lives inside the cell that is not causing any damage to the cell will not be seen on a Pap test, but might be detected on the HPV test. Pap testing has been used as a single test alone to detect early precancers and is very effective. If you do not have access to HPV testing or cannot afford it, Pap testing alone is still a very good test to have.

    If your HPV test and your Pap test are both negative and normal, your chances for having a cervical cancer precursor are less than five in 1,000 women—very low.
  • 3 Answers
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    Most women who have HPV infections never know it. This is one reason why you need regular Pap tests. A Pap test is when a cell sample is taken from your cervix and looked at with a microscope.

    A Pap test can find changes on the cervix caused by HPV. To do a Pap test, your doctor will use a small brush to take cells from your cervix. It's simple, fast, and the best way to find out if your cervix is healthy.

    If you are age 30 or older, your doctor may also do an HPV test with your Pap test. This is a DNA test that detects most of the high-risk types of HPV. It helps with cervical cancer screening. If you're younger than 30 years old and have had an abnormal Pap test result, your doctor may give you an HPV test. This test will show if HPV caused the abnormal cells on your cervix.

    One other way to tell if you have an HPV infection is if you have genital warts.

    This answer is based on source information from National Women's Health Information Center.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    Almost all women with cancer have the human papilloma virus (HPV), but most women with HPV never get dysplasia or cancer. HPV is extremely common; some studies show that it is present in the cervixes of almost 80% of sexually active women. There are over 100 subtypes of HPV, but it is the high-risk subtypes that are most likely to progress to cancer. This is why if you have HPV and your gynecologist says it is no big deal, you really shouldn’t worry about it. Really.