HPV

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    A Pediatrics, answered on behalf of

    Some strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV) cause cancer and some strains cause genital warts. Hopefully, you will not have to experience either of these.

    The cancer causing strains of HPV are found in about 95% of cervical cancer and cause the death of too many women each year. In men, the risk of penile and anal cancers are greatly increased. Please practice safe sex and protect yourself.

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    A , Health Education, answered
    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil has been tested in women ages 26 to 45; Cervarix has been tested in women ages 25 to 72. Both provide protection from specific HPV-type infections in women who have never been exposed to those types of HPV before. Because the number of women over age 26 who have not been exposed to HPV is small, the public health benefit of vaccination is not recognized. But you personally may benefit if your past sexual exposure has been limited. This is something to discuss with your doctor.
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    If you haven't already had your daughter or son vaccinated for the human papillomavirus (HPV), it's not too late. Ask your child's doctor about getting the HPV vaccine. Take advantage of any visit to the doctor -- such as an annual health checkup or physicals for sports, camp or college -- to ask the doctor about what shots your preteens and teens need.

    The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the US Government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.
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    A , Health Education, answered
    Only 15 types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are considered high-risk types that cause cancer. Most of the cancers are related to HPV 16, because HPV 16 is the quickest to progress into a cancer, but the other types, given enough time, can also form cancers.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Gynecologic Oncology, answered
    When should women start being tested for human papillomavirus (HPV)?

    Women over the age of 30 should be screened annually for human papillomavirus (HPV), says Elizabeth Poynor, MD, PhD, a gynecologist-oncologist in New York City. In this video, she explains why you should get the test.


  • 2 Answers
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) can be compared to infection with a common cold virus in terms of the natural progression of the illness. The body is exposed to the virus and, while the virus is active, the host will experience symptoms of viral infection. In the case of the common cold virus, one could experience a runny nose or cough. In the case of HPV infection, the only symptom of viral infection may be an abnormality on the annual Pap smear. Once the immune system mounts an effective response, the runny nose or cough resolves, and in the case of HPV, the abnormal Pap result resolves. For young women, the average amount of time for clearance of the HPV virus is eight to 24 months.
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    Yes. There are many types of HPV, so you can get HPV again.
    This answer is based on the source infromation from the National Women's Health Information Center
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  • 17 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most commonly transmitted STD. As many as 80 percent of sexually active people are infected with the virus. Surprisingly little is ever said about this disease. For a long time, the virus was believed to be benign, but now we know it substantially increases the risk of cervical cancer, thus aging the immune system. This STD also produces the chronic inflammation and chronic infections that age the arteries. Some strains cause small genital growths or warts that can be uncomfortable; these can easily be removed. If you have had more than two sex partners in your lifetime, or if your partner has had more than two sex partners, chances are you have been exposed to the virus. In general, human papillomavirus infection doesn't do much, and there are no treatments. But once you have it, you have it.
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    A , Health Education, answered

    Only if you are over 30 years old. If you want to space out your Pap testing to every 5 years, then ask your doctor to use both the HPV and Pap test. If both tests are negative/normal, then your chances of getting a precancerous lesion in the next 5 years is less than 5 per 1000.

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    The surest way to eliminate risk for genital human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection is to refrain from any genital contact with another individual.

    For those who choose to be sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent genital HPV infection. However, it is difficult to determine whether a partner who has been sexually active in the past is currently infected.

    It is not known how much protection condoms provide against HPV infection, because areas not covered by a condom can be infected by the virus. Although the effect of condoms in preventing HPV infection is unknown, condom use has been associated with a lower rate of cervical cancer, an HPV-associated disease.

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have approved two vaccines to prevent HPV infections: Gardasil® and Cervarix®. Both vaccines are highly effective in preventing persistent infections with HPV types 16 and 18, two high-risk HPVs that cause most (70 percent) cervical cancers. Gardasil also prevents infection with HPV types 6 and 11, which cause virtually all (90 percent) genital warts. In addition, there is some initial evidence that Cervarix provides partial protection against a few other HPV types that can cause cancer, but further evaluation is required before the magnitude and impact of this effect is understood.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.

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