Fitness Goals

Fitness Goals

Fitness Goals

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  • 5 Answers
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    The number of exercise goals you set should be determined by what you want to accomplish. Keep in mind that by setting a lot of exercise goals you may be putting a lot of pressure on yourself. Instead of setting a lot of goals at once think about prioritizing the things you want to achieve. Once you have an idea of what achievements are most important to you then you can decide how you want to proceed with setting a goal for that item. Remember that breaking your end goals down into smaller, more manageable steps or mini-goals can be a good way to stay on the path to success.
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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Fitness, answered
    Training with partners is not without hazards; you need to find training partners who are simpatico, who train at your pace, and willing to be flexible if you're having a bad day (likewise, you need to be sensitive to your partner's needs, and be willing to back off a bit if your partner is dragging). And there may be times when your body needs rest, no matter how badly you would like to join your friends on the hiking or jogging trails; at times like these, arrange to meet your training comrades for snacks after they've completed their workouts and you've had a rest.
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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Physical Therapy, answered
    Experts say efforts to change are more successful if they are SMART—that is, specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time-based. So as you're deciding on a lifestyle change or fitness goal, make sure it can pass the SMART test:

    S: Set a very specific goal. I will add one fruit serving—that's half a cup, chopped—to my current daily diet.

    M: Find a way to measure progress. I will log my efforts each day on my calendar.

    A: Make sure it's achievable. Be sure you're physically capable of safely accomplishing your goal. If not, aim for a smaller goal.

    R: Make sure it's realistic. It may seem counterintuitive, but choosing the change you most need to make—let's say, quitting smoking or losing weight—isn't as successful as choosing the change you're most confident you'll be able to make. Focus on sure bets: if you picture a 10-point scale of confidence in achieving your goal, where 1 equals no confidence and 10 equals 100% certainty, you should land in the 7-to-10 zone. An additional fruit serving a day is a small, manageable step toward better health.

    T: Set time commitments. Pick a date and time to start—Wednesday at breakfast, I'll add frozen blueberries to cereal—and regular check-in dates: I'll check my log every week and decide if I should make any changes in my routines to succeed. When setting commitments, outside deadlines can be really helpful. Signing up for a charity run or sprint triathlon on a certain date prods you to get a training program under way.
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  • 2 Answers
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    An exercise contract is often an agreement between a client and a trainer or fitness professional. When I draft agreements with my clients, they are twofold.

    1. What I agree to do for my client
    2. What my client agrees to do for themselves to ensure their success

    It includes things like 2-3 tangible goals, an agreed timeline, daily commitments, etc. Many things will sabotage fitness and wellness goals. A main key in client success is addressing those things up front and coming up with a plan to minimize the things that take you off course and setting up support to aid you in reaching your goals.

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  • 1 Answer
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    When a high school coach receives a new batch of freshmen trying out for track in January, they need to match these prospective athletes with events that match their skill and ability.  The first thing the coach should do is conduct a battery of tests. The first test should be a fifty yard dash to determine who is quick and who is not. The second test should consist of three continuous frog hops (jumps) into the long jump pit to determine who is dynamic and explosive. Oddly enough, shot putter and discus throwers are very good at this drill due to the strength in their legs. The third test is the two-handed backwards overhead shot put throw to determine who is explosive and dynamic. After conducting these tests, it will be very apparent who your sprinters, hurdlers, and jumpers will be. Those athletes not fairing well in any of those tests proceed to the two mile run test. The athletes that do well there are your distance runners. The athletes that do not do well there will have there futures left in the coach's hands.
  • 4 Answers
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    Here are a few ideas to help you succeed in a long-term program of physical activity:
    • Consider your interests. You're more likely to take up -- and keep up -- a new habit if it reflects who you are and what you like to do. Do you like competition or contemplation? Bursts of speed or long, steady efforts? Going solo or being guided through the moves? Choose things you enjoy.
    • Schedule it. Decide on a specific time for activity every day. Then keep this appointment! You might need to experiment a bit to find the best time for you -- before work? at your lunch hour? -- but make sure you get your minutes in. Remember, you won't "find" time for exercise. You have to make it.
    • Find a buddy. Having someone to exercise with can help you stay on a regular schedule and make fitness more fun. Exercising with family or friends is a great way to build your relationships and your health.
    • Set goals. Meeting a challenge is a great motivator. So set your sights on an activity goal -- for example, more minutes a day, heavier weights, or longer distances.
    • Mix it up. Like anything you do regularly, exercise can become a grind if you don't have some variety as you go along. So change your routine every so often. Try a new activity, a new location, or a new time. Join a new class, or try a new club. Stir the ingredients of your plan -- aerobic exercise, strength training, and stretching -- into an interesting new mix.
    • Make it a family affair. Don't just be an example -- get your loved ones moving with you. Walk after dinner as a family. Set aside a weekend afternoon for an active family outing. Instead of sweets, offer your kids fun activities -- like camping or a trip to the water park -- as rewards.
    • Think progress -- not perfection. Don't worry about "failing" at physical activity. Changing your lifestyle isn't a win-or-lose, all-or-nothing, short-term proposition. It's about making healthier decisions day by day and climbing back on the wagon when you slip up.
    • Remember your reasons. Remind yourself why you're exercising: less anxiety and depression, more energy, a healthier heart, stronger bones, and lower risk for diabetes and other illnesses. Do you want to give up any of those things? If not, keep moving.
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  • 2 Answers
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    A Fitness, answered on behalf of
    While setting goals, it is important to differentiate between an OUTCOME goal and a HABIT goal. I believe that having both are important. An outcome goal, generally, is a bigger picture, long-term goal. A process or habit goal is a habit-based goal that will aid you in achieving the outcome. The habit goal is something that is to be focused on daily. The outcome is the end point.

    With that, here is how to create a focused goal to maximize your performance and actions. 

    What is one thing I can do to achieve that?

    Often, we focus on OUTCOME goals - however, it takes many small actions to reach the outcome.
    Here is a method to refine your goals and become clear about which actions to take. Digging deeper than the outcome will uncover the needed actions. Continue to ask the same question until there is no answer left. That answer becomes the goal.

    Goal - Lose weight
    What is one thing I can do to accomplish that?

    Goal - Eat Better
    What is one thing I can do to accomplish that?

    Goal - Eat Breakfast
    What is one thing I can do to accomplish that?

    Goal - Eat Greek Yogurt and berries
    What is one thing I can do to accomplish that?
    Go shopping and purchase these items after work. While I am there I will also buy a salad for tomorrow's lunch.

    Actual Goal = Be sure to avoid distractions, get to the store and plan and prepare for breakfast and lunch. This will ensure that I eat better by eating breakfast, which will aid in weight loss.

    Vague goals = vague actions = vague results.
    Clear actions, repeated = outcome attainment.

    Have a GREAT DAY!

    Find out more about this book:

    90 Days to a New You: 2013 Edition
    Buy book
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Physical Therapy, answered
    To achieve a fitness goal, commit yourself. Make yourself accountable through a written or verbal promise to people you don't want to let down. That will encourage you to slog through tough spots. One intrepid soul created a Facebook page devoted to her goals for weight loss. You can make a less public promise to your partner or child, a teacher, doctor, boss, or friends. Want more support? Post your promise on Facebook, tweet it to your followers, or seek out folks with like-minded goals online.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Physical Therapy, answered
    To achieve a fitness goal, understand why you shouldn't make a change. That's right. Until you grasp why you're sticking like a burr to old habits and routines, it may be hard to muster enough energy and will to take a hard left toward change. Unhealthy behaviors like overeating and smoking have immediate, pleasurable payoffs as well as costs. So when you're considering a change, take time to think it through. You boost your chance of success when the balance of pluses and minuses tips enough to make adopting a new behavior more attractive than standing in place. Engaging in enjoyable aspects of an unhealthy behavior, without the behavior itself, helps too. For example, if you enjoy taking a break while having a smoke, take the break and enjoy it, but find healthier ways to do so. Otherwise, you're working against a headwind and are less likely to experience lasting success.
  • 7 Answers
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    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered

    By now you realize the importance of setting SMART goals.  However, here is something you can add to the mix.  Ask yourself:

    • On a scale of 1-10 how ready am I to commit to my goal?  1 is not ready and 10 is really ready.
    • On a scale of 1-10 how confident am I that I can achieve this goal.  1 is not confident and 10 is confident.

    It's important to remember that goals can be thinking goals or they can be action goals.  As has been already mentioned behavior change is a big deal and your personal goal may be only to think about what is involved in making the behavior change.

    Whatever the goals, make sure you ready to take them on and confident that you can achieve it and you will do well.

    All the best!

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