Diet & Nutrition

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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Your brain is wired to eat food when the body triggers certain hormones. That makes it very hard to control eating with willpower. However, if you focus on what you eat, you don’t have to worry about what you eat because your body will naturally reset that wiring. However, you do have to eat the right fats.

    For example, when you eat sugar or carbs, it turns on your fat storage system. It makes you store fat in your belly. It makes you hungry, and it makes your metabolism slow down. That prevents fat from being burned or freed from fat cells.

    When you eat fat, the opposite happens. You don’t simulate insulin, which is the fat storage hormone that gets triggered by sugar and carbs.

    If you eat fat without all the refined sugars and carbs, it actually makes you less hungry, speeds up your metabolism, and triggers more fat burning. So, you free more fat and lose weight without being hungry. You feel good from eating delicious foods that are creamy, luscious and savory as opposed to starving yourself with low-fat cardboard.
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Food is not just calories -- it’s actually instructions. This has been a big discovery in the last 20-30 years. Food is information. Literally every bite tells your body what to do: to gain or lose weight or to turn on or off different hormones, like insulin, which can make huge differences in the way it affects your neurotransmitters, your brain chemistry, and even your genes. Even the bacteria in your gut (your gut flora) are affected by what you eat. So, we send our body messages, literally, with what we’re eating.
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    A answered
    Greek yogurt has been strained to remove whey, which then gives it a creamier and thicker texture than traditional yogurt. Whey is the liquid remaining after milk has been curdled and strained. The straining process also removes some of the lactose and creates a product lower in sugar and total carbohydrates. Many enjoy the thicker texture of Greek yogurt, while others may not. Greek yogurt is higher in protein than traditional yogurt, but due to the removal of whey the calcium content may be lower. Many companies are adding calcium back to their products to make the content closer to traditional yogurt. Close examination and comparison of labels is important.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    An article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) last year showed that among 17 risk factors, nutrition was the number one risk factor responsible for death and disability in the United States, with impacts greater than all of the other terrible habits upon which we need to work -- such as smoking, physical inactivity, diabetes, etc. Many would argue that nutrition should be our number one target for improving wellness. The 2013 American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Guidelines on Lifestyle Management to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk advises us to consume a dietary pattern that emphasizes intake of vegetables, fruits and whole grains; includes low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, non-tropical vegetable oils and nuts; and limits intake of sodium, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages and red meats. Many advocate the “Mediterranean-style” diet because it is heavy on the vegetables and fruit, whole grains, encourages more fish and less red meat and conveys cooking oil should be predominantly olive oil. Conclusion: Be mindful of what you eat, every day.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    What does eating the rainbow mean?
    Eating the rainbow means using many colors of food to guide healthy eating. In this video, Crystal Robertson, a registered dietitian at Riverside Community Hospital, describes how this translates to foods.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    What other greens can I eat as a healthy alternative to kale?
    Any dark, leafy green will have similar health benefits to kale; including spinach, broccoli rabe, swiss chard and dandelion greens. Watch nutrition expert Brooke Alpert, RD, discuss some delicious alternatives to kale that are equally healthy.
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    A Anatomic Pathology & Clinical Pathology, answered on behalf of
    Why Is It Okay To Eat Aged Molded Bleu Cheese But Not Okay When It Comes To Other Foods Such As Bread Or Milk?
    The molds that produce bleu cheese are perfectly safe to eat, says John Turner, MD, a pathologist at Chippenham & Johnston-Willis Hospitals. In this video, he says that mold on soft cheese, though, might indicate the presence of bacteria.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Stefanie Sacks - How can small changes make a big difference in my diet?
    Small changes can make a big difference in your diet; moderation may be better for you than elimination, which could set you up for failure. In this video, culinary nutritionist Stefanie Sacks explains the power of making small lifestyle changes. 
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Stefanie Sacks - What is clean eating?
    Clean eating is being more mindful about our food choices, and eating foods that are in their most whole, natural form. Watch me explain that clean eating isn't about deprivation; it's about less ingredients. 
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    Some American adults get too little vitamin D, vitamin E, magnesium, calcium, vitamin A and vitamin C. More than 40% of adults have dietary intakes of vitamin A, C, D and E, calcium and magnesium below the average requirement for their age and gender. Inadequate intake of vitamins and minerals is most common among 14-to-18-year-old teenagers.

    Adolescent girls have lower nutrient intake than boys. But nutrient deficiencies are rare among younger American children; the exceptions are dietary vitamin D and E, for which intake is low for all Americans, and calcium. Approximately one-fifth of two-to-eight-year-old children don’t get enough calcium in their diets, compared to a half of adults and four-fifths of 14-to-18-year-old girls.