Diet & Nutrition

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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    A severe deficiency of thiamine results in a condition known as beriberi. Beriberi is characterized by extreme loss of appetite, congestive heart failure, water retention, psychosis (disorientation, hallucinations, loss of memory, etc.), muscle pain, and other symptoms of disturbed nerve function.

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    Treatment options for food addiction are similar to many other types of substance abuse treatment. Twelve-step programs, such as Overeaters Anonymous, and other support groups have formed across the country to help food addicts. Counselors and psychologists can help you get to the root cause of food addiction and can help you develop ways to deal with the eating compulsion when it arises. Working with a nutritionist to create food plans and identifying trigger foods that cause cravings can also help.

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    A answered

    Eating 6 ounces of salmon or other cold-water fish a week can reduce your risk of dying from heart disease by 36% and your risk of dying from any other cause by 17%. If that isn't enough motivation, consider this: Some research suggests that men who eat more omega-3s have better-formed sperm than men who eat less. To keep your swimmers in Michael Phelps condition, swap out saturated-fat-laden red meat for fish twice a week. Doing so may help protect against prostate cancer, as well.

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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Since heart disease, specific cancers, and stroke are the top three leading causes of death among American males, what men may be eating, or unfortunately, not eating enough of, may be detrimental to their long-term health.
    Here are some food and diet changes that could provide some disease-fighting, health benefit to all men, no matter what the age.

    Heart Disease Fighting Strategies:     

    One of the American Heart Association’s top diet strategies to beat heart disease is to eat two fish (preferably oily fish) meals (3.5 ounces each) weekly to reduce the risk of heart disease. Fish is not only low in heart-unhealthy saturated fat but also provides heart-healthy, omega 3 fatty acids. Research shows that these fatty acids may prevent irregular heart-beats, reduce atherosclerosis, and mildly lower blood pressure. Americans are currently consuming only about 0.1 to 0.2 grams of omega 3s daily, on average, as compared to the 0.5 grams recommended a day. Two fish meals a week will not only meet this daily recommendation but also displace saturated-fat laden protein-rich food, such as hot dogs, regular ground beef, and fried chicken on the plate.

    Cancer Fighting Strategies:

    With prostate cancer being the second leading cause of cancer death among American males, the photochemical, lycopene, may be one of best disease-fighting compounds on the plate. Research suggests that lycopene found in tomatoes and tomato products may help prevent prostate cancer. Cooking the tomatoes as well as serving them with a tad of oil has also shown to enhance the body’s absorption of this photochemical. Watermelon, pink grapefruit, and guava are other delicious food sources of lycopene.

    Stroke-Fighting Strategies:

    While limiting the sodium in the diet is important to lower high blood pressure, a risk factor for stroke, eating more potassium-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables can also lower blood pressure. Unfortunately, many Americans are falling short of the amount of potassium recommended daily as most are not eating the minimum recommended 4.5 cups of fruits and veggies a day.
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    Call your doctor right away if you believe you have malnutrition. (S)he will need to evaluate you and determine if you can be treated in a hospital or as an outpatient (at home and in clinic). You may be given supplements, such as Ensure or Boost, to make sure you are getting enough calories, protein, fats, and carbohydrates that your body needs.
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    Malnutrition is the condition that develops when the body is deprived of vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients it needs to maintain healthy tissues and organ function.

    Malnutrition occurs in people who are either undernourished or overnourished. Today, in the U.S., more children suffer from malnutrition due to dietary imbalances rather than nutritional deficiencies.

    Undernutrition occurs when not enough essential nutrients are consumed or when they are excreted more rapidly than they can be replaced. Overnutrition occurs in people who eat too much, eat the wrong things, don't exercise enough, or take too many vitamins or other dietary replacements. Risk of overnutrition is increased by being more than 20 percent overweight or consuming a diet high in fat and salt.

    About 1% of children in the United States suffer from chronic malnutrition.
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    A , Nursing, answered
    Nearly 150 million children under five are malnourished, and malnutrition is the underlying cause of most childhood illness and death. In the last two years, the cases of malnutrition are higher than they've been in that last century. Malnutrition affects an estimated two billion people and kills more than 3.5 million children under five years old each year.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    A form of malnutrition that is surprisingly widespread even in affluent countries is known as "micronutrient malnutrition." Micronutrient malnutrition, in which a person is deficient in some essential vitamins and trace minerals that are obtained from or supplemented by diet, can be common in older people, who tend to eat less and often have less variety in their diets.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    How can my child overcome deficits resulting from malnutrition?
    Malnutrition when a child is in utero, an infant or a toddler can cause lifelong health problems, says Karyn Purvis, Phd, founder and director of the TCU Institute of Child Development. Watch her tips on how to overcome it.
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    There are many different causes of malnutrition. Some categories of risk factors for malnutrition include: inadequate calorie intake, excess calorie losses or expenditures, and certain chronic medical illnesses. Some examples of risk factors for not consuming enough calories include: limited access to food (such as poverty or neglect), alcohol or drug addictions, and certain restrictive diets or eating disorders. People who may be at risk for losing calories include those with vomiting or diarrhea, or increased metabolic demands such as: extreme exercise, chronic infections and cancer. There are also a number of diseases that cause problems with caloric balance such as Crohn’s disease, food allergies, hyperthyroidism, and many more.