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What should my hemoglobin A1C levels be if I'm pregnant and have diabetes?

An A1C (Hemoglobin A1C) is a blood test that can predict average blood glucose levels for about 8-12 weeks. Women with diabetes should strive for "near normal" A1Cs prior to, as well as during, pregnancy. In general the target A1C should be less than 7% before pregnancy and less than 6% while pregnant.
If you have diabetes and are pregnant your A1C levels should be as close to normal as possible. Pregnant women who do not have diabetes typically have A1C levels of less than 5%, and this should be the target range for pregnant women with diabetes. The A1C test measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Glycated hemoglobin is created when molecules of hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in your blood) attach to molecules of glucose (the sugar in your blood). The more sugar you have in your blood, the higher your percentage of glycated hemoglobin. The American Diabetes Association recommends a target number of 4% to 6%. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommends a target number of no higher than 6%. Talk to your doctor about the best ways to manage your blood sugar levels during pregnancy.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.