Calories

Calories

Every time we talk about food it seems we also talk about calories. Calories, those numbers found on nutrition fact labels and what diets tell us to watch. Calories are really the measure of how much energy is available to our bodies from what we eat. Every calorie is the same, whether it comes from legumes or lard. We burn calories from food when we perform any activity. When we eat more calories than we burn, then our bodies happily store the remaining calories as fat. Each pound of fat stores about 3,500 calories. How many calories you should have each day depends on many things, from your level of activity to your age and desired body weight.

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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    In addition to being low in volume for the amount of calories they contain, typical foods in the western diet are also very low in thickness or viscosity. They become thin watery liquids once they are chewed, swallowed, and mixed with fluids and acid in the stomach. Low viscosity foods move through the digestive tract very quickly and are rapidly absorbed, which means that your digestive system will be looking for more food shortly after you have eaten your meal. As well, many of the foods typical of the modern Western diet contain highly refined carbohydrates, which tend to result in a rapid and excessive elevation of after-meal blood sugars (high glycemic impact). Foods that cause blood sugar to surge rapidly after meals may contribute to initial satiety, but they backfire and end up actually promoting excessive food intake in the hours that follow.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    To gain lean body mass, one needs to eat nutrient-dense, balanced meals rich in carbohydrate and moderate in lean protein and fat to supply your body with the energy and nutrients needed to build lean tissue. Understand that excess protein will not build new muscle tissue. An appropriate training stimulus (weight training geared towards muscle hypertrophy) plus about 300 extra calories per day over your current calorie needs are key to muscle growth.
     
    Fuel your strength training sessions with foods containing carbohydrate and protein to provide energy for muscle contraction, spare protein from use for energy, and supply amino acids for building and repair. (Snack on a carb/10-20 grams of protein combo both before and immediately after your workouts such as chocolate milk.)
     
    Be sure to have your body composition assessed by a professional before weight gain to ensure that the added weight is muscle mass, not body fat. Ideally, a registered dietitian who is a certified specialist in sports dietetic (CSSD) would be your best bet. You can find one practicing near you on the following web site: www.ScanDPG.org
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    If you need to increase your caloric intake, get the extra calories you need by increasing the number of servings of vegetables, nuts, and legumes, as these are the best foods for improving blood sugar control. Athletes or people engaged in heavy physical labor or exercise should add another serving of seafood, meat, or poultry to their daily intake or add a soy protein or whey protein smoothie to provide an additional 25 to 30 grams of protein.

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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Is it important to track calories?
    It's more important to listen to your body and eat real foods than track your calories. Watch me explain why whole foods are best, and how different types of calories can function differently in the body. 
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Check out these summer sports and fun activities and the calories they burn per hour (based on a 130-pound woman):
    • Frisbee, 177 Calories Per Hour
    • Surfing, 177 Calories Per Hour
    • Softball, 295 Calories Per Hour
    • Kayaking, 295 Calories Per Hour
    • Hiking, 355 Calories Per Hour
    • Water skiing, 355 Calories Per Hour
    • Ocean swimming, 355 Calories Per Hour
    • Scuba diving, 414 Calories Per Hour
    • Flag football, 472 Calories Per Hour
    • Beach volleyball, 473 Calories Per Hour
    • Rock climbing (ascending), 650 Calories Per Hour
    • Rollerblading, 739 Calories Per Hour
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    Depending on your intensity, working out with weights can help you burn between 234 and 413 calories per hour.
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    A 150 pound person can burn approximately 238 calories per hour vacuuming the house.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    How can I cut calories from fast food?
    To cut calories from fast food, think about what you are going to eat and make as many healthy choices as you can. In this video, nutritionist Marisa Moore, RDN, shares some tips that will help keep the calorie count down, even at a fast food joint.
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    On average, a 150 pound person can burn approximately 272 calories per hour gardening.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    No matter what kind of fat you eat, remember that fats are "fattening." Fats, whether in our bodies or in the plants and animals we eat, are energy stores and loaded with calories. Fat contains more calories per gram than either protein or carbohydrate. All fats, whether unsaturated or saturated, contain 9 calories per gram, whereas carbohydrates and proteins contain only four calories per gram.
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