Bacterial Infections

Bacterial Infections

Bacterial Infections
Bacterial infections like typhoid, strep throat and some sexually transmitted diseases are infections caused by different types of bacteria. These infections are often treated with doctor-prescribed antibiotics. Either viruses or bacteria can cause infections, so it’s important to get examined by a doctor to make sure you’re prescribed the correct medication.

Recently Answered

  • 3 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Nosocomial infections—or infections spread in the hospital—are a serious health risk. As you know (or can imagine), hospitals are breeding grounds for such germs because of all the sick people and the constant contact from person to person and from person to thing. Many hospitals are doing a lot to reduce the risk of spreading infections, but it's a tough task—and it's a problem you should be aware of if you're admitted to or are visiting a hospital.

    You won't be offending your doctor or nurse if you ask them to wash their hands; ask them if they used soap and water or alcohol (tell them you're taking a poll). They'll get the message. Sometimes they get sloppy, and you must protect yourself.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The plague is caused by the bacteria Yesinia pestis and is found on rodents and their fleas. There are two types: pneumonic plague, where the bacteria enter the lungs via air droplets from close contact with an infected person or animal, and bubonic plague, which enters the bloodstream via infected fleas.

     

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered

    Pneumococcal infections are bacterial infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae) that occasionally cause pneumonia -- inflammation of the lungs that can be caused by either bacteria or viruses. Pneumococcal disease can cause conditions that have a high death rate: severe pneumonia, pneumococcal bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream, possibly leading to infection), and meningitis (inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord).

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Osteomyelitis is a serious condition that can be very difficult to distinguish from other conditions. Osteomyelitis can even be present with no symptoms for months or longer. Bacteria or fungi enter the body through a wound or from a minor infection. They move along through the bloodstream and can enter the bone, causing the immune system to send more blood to the affected area and tissue to swell inside the bone. The swollen tissue pushes against the walls of the bone causing reduced circulation that can result in bone death in the affected area.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    A person with toxic shock syndrome experiences symptoms suddenly. These symptoms may include a high fever, red eyes, a sore throat, vomiting, diarrhea, aching muscles, and a skin rash that peels like a sunburn. Within several days, the symptoms become quickly worse. The person's blood pressure falls and swelling occurs as fluids accumulate in body tissues. Eventually, major organs such as the heart, lungs, kidneys, and liver begin to fail.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Doctors often use two types of medications to treat diphtheria: antitoxins and antibiotics. People with the disease are often quarantined in the intensive care unit until the infection is gone. If an individual is experiencing breathing problems the doctor may remove some of the thick, gray psuedomembrane covering the throat. If you are not experiencing symptoms of diphtheria, but still possess the disease, it is most likely you will be treated with medication to clear the diphtheria-related toxin from your body

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If the flesh-eating bacteria S. pyogenes infects someone and causes necrotizing fasciitis, the treatment required is extensive. Tissue destroyed by the quick-spreading infection will have to be removed in the operating room; this often requires removal of large areas of muscle, tissue, and skin or even arms or legs. In addition to surgery, someone infected with flesh-eating bacteria will be given antibiotics through an IV. Donor immunoglobins (antibodies from blood plasma donations) may also be used. Unfortunately, even with treatment, recovery isn't guaranteed. Early treatment can improve the outlook.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    The only way to cure an infection of Legionnaires' disease is to take antibiotics prescribed by your doctor. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are crucial to a full recovery. If someone with Legionnaires' disease is treated incorrectly or left untreated, they risk serious complications that result from the infection of legionella bacteria such as organ failure or septic shock.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    The basic effects of bubonic plague are the same whether a person is a child or an adult. However, one study has indicated that children are more likely to have swelling in the cervical and armpit areas. During the period of history known as the Black Death epidemic, when the bubonic plague killed about one-third of European people, the mortality rate of children was exceptionally high. Recent research suggests that this trend continues today; in one study found that three-fourths of the people in the study who were infected with the plague were less than 25 years old.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If you are suffering from an infection, it's important to be careful. Septic arthritis can occur if you have a previous infection and then suffer an injury to a particular joint. Likewise, septic arthritis can occur from an infected injury or infection during surgery. If you are undergoing surgery, talk to your doctor about how to avoid septic arthritis.