Bacterial Infections

Bacterial Infections

Bacterial Infections
Bacterial infections like typhoid, strep throat and some sexually transmitted diseases are infections caused by different types of bacteria. These infections are often treated with doctor-prescribed antibiotics. Either viruses or bacteria can cause infections, so it’s important to get examined by a doctor to make sure you’re prescribed the correct medication.

Recently Answered

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    ARealAge answered
    Tick paralysis is a treatable condition caused by a tick bite. It causes loss of muscle function, which means a person can no longer move. The paralysis and weakness moves up from the lower body to the upper body. This usually happens over several days. As the paralysis moves up, the lungs can be affected, leading to breathing problems and the need for breathing support. Once the tick is removed, symptoms usually get better quickly. The root cause of the paralysis is a neurotoxin, injected into the person's body through the tick's bite.
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    ARealAge answered
    Clue cells are cells from the lining of the vagina that are coated in bacteria. They may be found in a woman's vaginal fluid or discharge. They're called clue cells because the presence of bacteria on them can help doctors diagnose a vaginal infection, such as bacterial vaginosis. Clue cells are usually taken from the vagina using a swab. They are then viewed on a slide, under a microscope.
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    ARealAge answered
    Ehrlichiosis iis a group of bacterial diseases that is spread through the bite of a tick. These diseases usually come from the "lone star tick," a type of tick that's more common in the eastern half of the United States (including Texas, Arkansas, Tennessee, Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Wisconsin and many other states). Many people don't realize they've had a tick bite. While symptoms vary from person to person, they usually start as early as 5 days but more often 12 days after the tick bite. They usually include flu-like symptoms, such as fever, chills, headache, fatigue and muscle aches. Some people also have diarrhea or a rash that looks like flat, red spots or small red dots on the skin. Serious complications are possible, but most people recover completely from the illness with antibiotic treatment.
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    AScripps Health answered
    Pneumococcal disease is a bacterial infection that can lead to serious and often deadly illnesses including pneumonia, meningitis and blood infections. Annually, pneumococcal meningitis and blood infections kill thousands of adults, and up to 175,000 people are hospitalized with pneumococcal pneumonia. People ages 65 and older have a higher risk of contracting pneumococcal disease and developing serious illness. 
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    Group B strep (GBS) bacteria can come and go naturally in the body. If you have the bacteria in your body when you go into labor, they can spread to your baby during labor. Carrying GBS bacteria does not mean that a person is not clean, and it does not mean that she has a sexually transmitted disease. The bacteria are not spread from food, sex, water or anything that a woman might have come into contact with.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    A woman should ask her doctor or nurse for a group B strep (GBS) test when she is 35 to 37 weeks pregnant. The test is an easy swab of the vagina and rectum that should not hurt.

    Each time a woman is pregnant, she needs to be tested for GBS. It doesn't matter if she did or did not have this type of bacteria before; each pregnancy is different.The only time you don't need the test and will automatically be recommended antibiotics during labor is if you've delivered a previous baby with early-onset GBS disease, or if the bacteria were found in your urine at any time during this pregnancy.

    (The presence of the CDC logo and CDC content on this page should not be construed to imply endorsement by the U.S. government of any commercial products or services, or to replace the advice of a medical professional. The mark “CDC” is licensed under authority of the PHS.)
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    AUCLA Health answered
    Tetanus infections are rare but are associated with a high death rate. More than half -- 60% -- of tetanus infections are in people 60 years or older. Older adults who have never been vaccinated should receive two tetanus shots, one to two months apart, followed by a third shot six to 12 months later. After that, tetanus booster shots should be given about every 10 years.
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    A Robin Miller, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Is there going to be a simple way to detect lung infections, such as pneumonia and TB?

    There are breath tests that can detect the chemical finger print in different bacteria that have been found in mice. Watch this video with Robin Miller, MD as she talks about where we are headed with these tests in the future.

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    Some studies show that homeopathy may help treat vaginal infections called recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC). These results must be confirmed in more studies.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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