Arthritis Treatment

Arthritis Treatment

Arthritis Treatment
Arthritis treatment is based on the severity of symptoms and location of the joint inflammation. Oral medications and topical creams can help relieve joint pain. Physical therapy and activity modification can improve flexibility and joint health. Your doctor may recommend diet changes to eliminate foods that increase inflammation. Although there is no cure for most types of arthritis, early diagnosis and proper management are important, particularly for inflammatory types of arthritis.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    A growing body of evidence shows that avocado soybean unsaponifiables (ASU) stimulates the production of cartilage, inhibits its breakdown, and decreases pain to an extent similar to non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but without negative side effects.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    Rarely, after a steroid injection for arthritis, a joint can have a "post-injection flare" in which symptoms temporarily worsen. The flare will generally subside within 48 - 72 hours. If this happens to you, call your doctor for further care, and also to help rule out an infection.

    In addition to the effects on the joint, steroid injections can raise blood sugar levels, so people with diabetes need to be especially aware of this potential side effect and discuss it with their doctor. A steroid injection can change the pigmentation of the skin, making it lighter. This is a rare complication, but it is a potential problem, particularly in people with darker skin. There are other side effects, and some people are not good candidates for steroid injections. If you are taking a blood thinner, you may need to discontinue it prior to the injection. It is important to discuss the potential benefits and risks with your physician. If you do have a steroid injection, be sure to have it done by a qualified, experienced professional.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Rheumatology, answered on behalf of
    There are some over-the-counter herbal remedies that include turmeric and other herbs that some people claim help arthritis. However, there is not enough data to make a formal recommendation. Some herbal remedies contain a mixture of herbs that may have unknown side effects.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Neurology, answered
    If you do not have to take medication as often, there are fewer pill bottles to open, fewer pills to take and less stress about missing a dose. Ask your doctor if a long-acting or time-release version is appropriate for you.

    Find out more about this book:

    Arthritis
    Buy book
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Arthritis and gout are most often associated with articulating joints like the big toe, the ankle, knee etc. If the patient has persistent heel pain on the bottom of the heel and foot, the most likely culprit would be pain associated with plantar fasciitis, a heel spur or perhaps a stress fracture of the calcaneus (heel). X-rays and a bone scan can be used to rule these problems out and can be prescribed by a physician. Following diagnosis, treatment in the form of medication and exercise can be initiated to help. In any case, a physician’s evaluation and diagnosis is the first step.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    To treat basal joint arthritis, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug can be used regularly, as long as it doesn't cause gastrointestinal (GI) or stomach problems. Examples include ibuprofen (Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve), which can be purchased in over-the-counter or prescription doses. The next step up would be occupational or hand therapy. This involves learning new ways to use your hands to avoid pain at the base of your thumb.

    Additional options would be splints. These range from a soft flexible neoprene-type brace that encloses the thumb and wraps around the wrist, to a more customized rigid brace that tries to relieve force across the base of the thumb joint.

    Any time a person has pain in the base of their thumb or by their wrist for more than a few days or a week, and it seems to get worse over time and with certain activities, it's best to get medical care. This can help prevent it from getting too bad too quickly.

    Surgery is the last option. If all of these conservative options fail to relieve symptoms or at least get them down to a tolerable level, then surgery is an option. If it gets to the point that you're having significant pain with regular activities every day, it's time to start thinking about surgery.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    An estimated 50,000 people a year experience end-stage ankle arthritis, in which the ankle cartilage has worn away completely, causing painful bone-on-bone contact and some level of disability. Until lately, such patients have had only one surgical option: ankle fusion surgery. However, in the past 10 years or so, total ankle replacement surgery has been found to be a safe and effective treatment option for select patients with ankle arthritis. In many patients, total ankle replacement surgery substantially improves function, reduces pain, and allows for an improved quality of life. Patient mobility and quality-of-life factors contribute to longer independent living and to controlling overall healthcare costs.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    The mechanism of action of topical pain relievers is an issue of some debate, and they may be underutilized because there has not been as much research about them as the other arthritis medications. Skeptics argue that very little of the active ingredient is actually absorbed through the skin, and that many topical solutions, including those that contain menthol, act by irritating the surrounding tissue, which increases blood flow to the joint or other painful area. This, in turn, would then presumably increase the elimination of inflammatory waste products.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Neurology, answered
    Recognize your uniqueness. Everyone is different; you have your own unique symptoms and responses to everything, from activity to medications. Be aware of what works and what doesn’t seem to work for you.

    Work with your doctor to find what works for you. If one medication is not helping, ask to try another. If side effects are worse than the original condition, speak up. Be an active participant in your health care.

    Find out more about this book:

    Arthritis
    Buy book
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Acupuncture can be complementary or an alternative treatment to manage pain from arthritis. Acupuncture has low to minimal side effects.
    See All 2 Answers