Types Of Exercise

Types Of Exercise

Types Of Exercise

Exercise provides many health benefits - from fitness to increased physical and mental energy. In order to prepare yourself for a exercise routine, you need to research which exercise is right for you and how to fit a new exercise program into your daily schedule.

Recently Answered

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    ANatalie Castro-Romero, MS, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida
    It is best to eat more than two hours but less than four hours before exercise. Your body prefers to run on the sugar (glucose) in your blood. Carbohydrates like bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, cereal, crackers or fruit are good foods to eat before exercise because they quickly break down into glucose. After exercise, carbohydrates quickly replace glucose your body used during exercise. Remember to drink plenty of water before and during a workout.
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    ARonald Tolchin, DO, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered on behalf of Baptist Health South Florida
    Weekend warrior syndrome is what happens when you don't exercise at all during the week and then overdo your exercise on the weekend. Weekend warriors may exercise for several hours without stretching properly beforehand and get into awkward positions while twisting and turning during exercise. The result can be pain in your back or other body parts.
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    One of the most common mistakes exercisers make is not performing a proper warm-up and cool-down before exercise. The benefits of performing warm-ups and cool-downs remains a heated debate in the industry relating to increased risk of exercise-induced injury. However, there is enough scientific evidence to conclude that not preparing one's body for exercise has more risk to potential injury to one to view the warm-up and cool-down as a critical component. Every client should go through a pre-session package movement screen and health-risk assessment. This gives the trainer a good picture of where each and every client’s starting ability is at, if she has any health risks that pose dangers to vigorous exercise, and if she has any movement impairments that could be made worse by an incorrect exercise prescription. Then, a recommended warm-up and cool-down can be built into her program and she can be taught proper exercise techniques and what to do to get her body ready to exercise.

    Here are some beginning starting tips:
    • Spend the first 5-10 minutes of every workout performing some or all of the following: foam rolling (i.e., self myofascial release); light to moderate stretching; and/or light cardio (e.g., walking, stationary bike, or treadmill work).
    • Spend the last 5-10 minutes of each routine repeating the warm-up exercises as a postworkout cool-down. Focus on holding stretches for 30-40 seconds on muscles heavily worked during exercise to help increase mobility and decrease postworkout soreness. Relax as much as possible to get that great stress release.
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    Dehydration is known to decrease strength and endurance in many athletes, and this includes weightlifters. Researchers at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., found that losing 1.5% of body weight in a sauna caused a 13-lb decrease in maximum bench-press strength. This was rectified if the athletes were allowed to rest and drink water during the two-hour period after the sauna. This study has implications for gym weightlifters as well as athletes in such sports as boxing, judo and wrestling.

    Dehydration can impair one's ability to train and perform at a maximum level. Consume either water or a sports drink in the weight room to maintain maximum strength while training.
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    Waking up after an eight-hour fast, the body’s stored glycogen (muscle fuel) is somewhat depleted. Doing cardio in this state improves one's body’s ability to burn fat because the lack of available glycogen forces the body to use fat as fuel. A study at Kansas State University published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise demonstrated that subjects burned a kilogram (2.2 lb) of fat sooner when they exercised in a fasted (empty-stomach) state in the morning than when they did it later in the day or in the evening.

    Don’t do a long, intense workout or a weight workout on an empty stomach, but a light to moderate cardio routine first thing in the morning may be a great fat-burning kickstarter.
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    AHenry Lodge, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Aerobic fitness is all about making more energy in the muscles. That means building more mitochondria and bringing them more fuel and oxygen. Mitochondria can burn either fat or glucose. It’s like having a car that can run on either diesel (fat) or gasoline (glucose), depending on your needs: diesel for long-haul road trips, high-octane gasoline for speed and acceleration. Your muscles prefer to burn fat most of the time, because it’s a more efficient fuel, but for hard exercise -- for speed and power -- you burn glucose.
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    AHenry Lodge, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    When you exercise fairly hard, you stress your muscles. You drain them of energy stores, and you actually injure them slightly. The stress of exercise is good because it tears you down to build you back up a little stronger. You wear out little bits that need to be replaced after each use, requiring lots of fine tuning and minor repairs. This type of injury is called adaptive micro-trauma.

    Enzymes and proteins from an exercised muscle leak into your bloodstream where they start a powerful chain reaction of inflammation. White blood cells are drawn to the scene to begin the demolition process. These cells are the wrecking crew, the team brought in when you start renovating your house. The guys with sledgehammers, crowbars, wheelbarrows and dumpsters who tear down the old plaster and rip the walls apart to take your house back to its healthy foundation.

    Since white blood cells are part of your immune system, you may think they exist primarily to protect you against infection and cancer. Well, that’s part of the story, but your immune system’s other job is to demolish big chunks of your body every day so you can grow. White cells are killer cells programmed to destroy bacteria, viruses and cancer cells by dissolving them in a toxic, caustic brew, like paint stripper. But they also use these same mechanisms to demolish the millions of cells that die their natural deaths every day.

    With the short-term stress of exercise, this works well. Once the demolition is done, growth and repair take over. In a healthy body, the demolition actually triggers the repair process. That’s a key point. The inflammation itself automatically triggers repair. Decay triggers growth. When the demolition is done, the plumber, electrician and master carpenter come in. New pipes, new wires and new walls go in where needed. The old stuff that’s worth saving, the infrastructure and the detail work, is polished and sanded back to its original state.

    Just remember two things. One: Decay triggers growth. And two: Exercise turns on inflammation, which automatically turns on repair.
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    AHenry Lodge, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    When you exercise fairly hard, you stress your muscles. You drain them of energy stores, and you actually injure them slightly. The stress of exercise is good, because it tears you down to build you back up a little stronger. You wear out little bits that need to be replaced after each use, requiring lots of fine tuning and minor repairs. This type of injury is called adaptive micro-trauma.

    Adaptive micro-trauma is critical to your growth and health. It’s the signal to your body that it needs to repair muscle damage -- and then some. It needs to make the muscle just a little stronger. To store just a little more energy for tomorrow. To build a few more tiny blood vessels inside the muscle. To get a little younger.
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    ACynthia R. Green, PhD, Psychology, answered
    Research shows that regular aerobic exercise can:
    • Improve your memory and other skills, such as attention, processing speed and executive control, which matter to daily intellectual performance.
    • Significantly decrease your risk for dementia.
    • Significantly reduce your risk for or be an important part of managing medical conditions that in turn increase your risk for dementia, such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension.
    Start today on the road to better brain health by boosting your exercise time. Get at least 30 minutes of exercise several days a week. Even brisk walking has been proven to be beneficial to brain health. Make it easier to stick with your exercise plan by penciling in time to work out, finding an exercise buddy, or setting clear exercise goals with built-in rewards.

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    30 Days to Total Brain Health®
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    The success of your workout may not be about calories burned, but intensity and duration. A study in the International Journal of Epidemiology found that those who did 75 minutes of vigorous exercise weekly had a 66% fewer chance of developing metabolic syndrome than those who did 150 minutes of moderate exercise. (This was regardless of calories burned.) Metabolic syndrome is a nasty condition that leads to diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and increased risk of stroke and heart disease.

    Intensity levels are individual, so take heart rate, age and other factors in mind. The bottom line is to pick up the pace for a better training result.