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Does walking count as exercise?

Moderate-intensity walking certainly counts as exercise. In fact, it’s a great physical activity option for many people for a number of reasons:
  • It is well tolerated by people across a range of fitness levels, ages, and medical histories.
  • Walking doesn’t have to cost you anything. You can walk for free in your neighborhood or in a mall.
  • It helps reduce stress and can be done for “alone time” or with others to connect with friends, family, or a family dog.
A typical goal, based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines, would be to get 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week (30 minutes a day, 5 days a week). Brisk walking is classified as a moderate-intensity exercise.
Before beginning a walking program, discuss safety and goals with your doctor. Especially if you have a history of heart disease, your doctor may want you to have a stress test prior to starting physical activity. A stress test monitors and records your heart’s electrical activity during exercise to determine the effects of exercise on the rate and rhythm of your heart. Your doctor can also help you decide which exercises are safe and may refer you to other qualified health professionals (for example, a physical therapist or an exercise physiologist) for guidance.

Any form of movement is exercise.  Walking falls into that category and will surely be considered to be exercise.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.