Vitamin E

Vitamin E

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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    Headlines about the SELECT (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial) study screamed VITAMIN E CAUSES PROSTATE CANCER. But that's not what the study found. The study only showed that large doses of a certain type of vitamin E failed to prevent prostate cancer and may have caused a slight increased risk for the disease. Some cancer specialists weren't persuaded by the findings that vitamin E supplements pose a threat. Earlier studies suggest that small doses of another form of vitamin E, called d-alpha-tocopherol succinate, may lower the risk for prostate cancer. 
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    sunflower seeds

    Vitamin E is a fat soluble vitamin and a powerful antioxidant. Vitamin E occurs naturally in vegetables oils such as corn and olive oils, peanut butter, sunflower seeds, almonds, and wheat germ.


    sunflower seeds
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you are taking statins, avoid taking vitamin E. Vitamin E supplements can deplete your body of coenzyme Q10 by increasing its rate of breakdown. The depletion of coenzyme Q10 by statins and vitamin E is likely to be additive. This interaction may explain the scientific data that vitamin E supplements can interfere with the life-saving benefits of statins and increase the severity of heart failure in people with heart disease. High doses of vitamin E (more than 100 international units a day) should not be mixed with statins.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Some studies have linked higher vitamin E intakes with a lower risk of breast and prostate cancers, but not consistently. And findings from the Women's Health Study, in which healthy women ages 45 and older took 600 IU of vitamin E or a placebo every other day for 10 years, showed no difference in cancer rates between the two groups.

    The National Cancer Institute halted a study designed to test whether 200 micrograms (mcg) of selenium and 400 IU of vitamin E, taken alone or in combination, could lower the risk of prostate cancer. The trial was slated to last eight years but was stopped after just five. Researchers had grown concerned that taking the supplements might do more harm than good, based on a slight increase in prostate cancer rates among the men taking vitamin E alone.
  • 3 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    At one time, vitamin E was the king of antioxidants, credited with all kinds of antiaging, disease-fighting powers. Then came study after study showing that taking more than 400 international units of E a day actually increased deaths from any cause. While antioxidants like E may fight oxidation damage in the blood, they sometimes cause it inside your cells.

    Worse, researchers now report that vitamin E might encourage certain hormonally driven cancers. So do not take more than 30 international units per day. There's very little E in food (unless you suck down wheat germ oil), so no worries there. What's in your multi will cover you.
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    Well-known for its healthy-skin benefits, vitamin E is an antioxidant that has been shown to support the immune system in addition to helping slow down the aging process. It acts as a “big brother” to other vitamins, protecting them from oxidation and, thus, allowing them to do their work.
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Always talk to your doctor before taking any new supplement or drug to avoid possible interactions with other medicines you may take or existing health issues you may have. Be sure to talk to your doctor before taking vitamin E if you have allergies, bleeding problems or are taking medications such as dicumarol or warafin, so he or she can monitor your dose closely. If you're pregnant, plan to become pregnant or are breastfeeding, consult your doctor before taking vitamin E.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You should not take vitamin E if you are taking dicumarol. It is also not recommended to take vitamin E if you are taking warafin. Taking warafin with vitamin E may increase your risk for certain side effects. If you have bleeding problems, talk to your doctor before you start taking vitamin E because high doses may worsen your condition.

    It is not recommended that anyone with retinitis pigmentosa take oral vitamin E because it appears to cause disease progression more rapidly.
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  • 6 Answers
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    2 150 5-1 Chef Showdown

    Vitamin E is a brain-booster essential for good health. In this video, Dr. Oz quizzes his guests, Family Feud-style, on which foods are loaded with vitamin E.


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  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    Despite the results of the SELECT (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial) study, it's still an open question whether vitamin E supplements are safe and effective for preventing diseases such as prostate cancer. The important takeaway message from the SELECT study is that large doses of a specific form of vitamin E, called dl-alpha-tocopherol-acetate, proved to be ineffective for lowering the risk of prostate cancer. In fact, men given the supplements had a slightly increased risk for the disease. Yet earlier research found that much smaller doses of a different form of vitamin E, called d-alpha-tocopherol succinate, appeared to help prevent prostate cancer. As always, the best advice is to talk to your doctor about using vitamin E and any other dietary supplements.