Vitamin E

Vitamin E

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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Vitamin E is an antioxidant that's been touted to prevent lung cancer. However, in excess amounts, vitamin E can actually become an ANTI-anti-oxidant and damage deoxy ribonucleic acid (DNA), which can lead to cancer growth. (Until recently, vitamin E was recommended to ease hot flashes, but new evidence suggests that long-term use may actually be harmful.)
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Vitamin E is an antioxidant that's been touted to prevent lung cancer. However, in excess amounts, vitamin E can actually become an anti-anti-oxidant and damage DNA, which can lead to cancer growth.

    (Until recently, vitamin E was recommended to ease hot flashes, but new evidence suggests that long-term use may actually be harmful.)

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended daily value for vitamin E is 30 IU, which means you really don't need to take a vitamin E supplement in addition to your multivitamin. The optimal way to get vitamin E is in your diet. Pistachios are one of the best dietary sources of gamma-tocopherol, a form of vitamin E. One or two handfuls of these nuts a day provides a healthy dose of this nutrient.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    When taken under a doctor's supervision and at safe doses, vitamin E pills and other antioxidant supplements may be helpful. Antioxidants are nutrients that can help protect your body against the effects of free radicals, which are volatile molecules that may cause damage to DNA or even cell death. Some antioxidant nutrients include vitamins A, C and E, selenium, beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene. Supplements of these nutrients may be especially helpful for people who can't absorb enough of these nutrients from the foods they eat.

    Taken in too high doses or in combination with certain drugs, however, supplements of these nutrients may be risky. For example, vitamin E may increase the risk of excessive bleeding, especially if you take blood thinners. It may also interact with other medications, making them less effective. High doses of vitamin E during pregnancy may increase risks of birth defects. Consult your doctor before taking supplements of vitamin E or any dietary supplement.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    A broad class of related natural chemicals called tocopherols comprise the fat-soluble antioxidants we call vitamin E. Alphatocopherol is generally regarded as the most active form of vitamin E in humans, though research has begun to show the importance of other forms of the vitamin. By definition, the proper levels of all vitamins are essential to human health, but good evidence now links vitamin E intake to the prevention of eye diseases, including cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration; other studies may link the vitamin to the prevention or delay of both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

    Meanwhile, ongoing research is exploring vitamin E’s role in the prevention of heart disease, cancer and a host of other diseases. You may have noticed some studies in the last few years that downplay the effect of vitamin E. I implore that you pay little attention to them. These studies were indeed carried out by recognized groups but were incomplete and in my opinion irresponsible. They appeared to suggest that vitamin E at higher doses -- doses I regard as therapeutic -- could cause more harm then good. But these were “all-cause mortality” studies, which means that if you were one of the subjects taking vitamin E and got hit by a bus, the researchers would have counted you as having died from taking vitamin E. Getting hit by a bus or dying from natural causes is nothing whatsoever to do with vitamin E. Most scientific evidence suggests vitamin E is an excellent antioxidant, and when you need more of it, it’s crucial to obtain it through a supplement.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    People who consume the highest amount of vitamin E are 43 percent less likely to get Alzheimer's. You can get the vitamin E you need by eating just 3 ounces of nuts or seeds a day (about 15.5 milligrams), which is my preferred method. Alternatively, you can take a 400 IU (international unit) supplement daily if you take it with vitamin C and are not taking statin drugs like Lipitor.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Vitamin E is a fat-soluble, antioxidant vitamin, also called alpha-tocopherol. Medically,vitamin E is used only for vitamin E deficiency. There are conditions that may increase your need for vitamin E, such as intestine disease, liver disease, pancreas disease, or surgical removal of your stomach. It has been proposed that vitamin E can help prevent and treat a number of health conditions, including certain types of cancer, but there is not enough evidence to prove this. You only need a small amount of vitamin E and you can get it through a balanced diet. Vitamin E can be found in vegetable oils, green leafy vegetables, seeds, nuts, wheat germ, and other foods. It is also available as a supplement, but the supplement alone does not replace a balanced diet.

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  • 1 Answer
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    A answered
    Vitamin E is an antioxidant that may help prevent heart disease, Alzheimer's, and two common vision stealers -- macular degeneration and cataracts. Government guidelines recommend a daily intake of 22.5 international units (IU) of vitamin E, but this is only enough to prevent deficiency. For optimal health and disease prevention, we recommend that you aim for 400 international units (IU) of vitamin E per day. It's tough to get all the vitamin E you need from food alone, so top off your supply with a daily vitamin E supplement.

    Tip: Take your E with C (1,200 mg). These two antioxidant vitamins work together to prevent the oxidation that causes clogs in blood vessel walls, and pairing them on a daily basis can make you look 3 years younger.
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    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    At this point, it's hard to say whether taking vitamin E supplements will lower your risk for prostate cancer. In one large study known as the SELECT (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial) study, men who took 400 International Units of vitamin E daily actually had a slightly increased risk for prostate cancer. Consider this, though: There are several forms of vitamin E. In the study, men took a form known as dl-alpha-tocopherol-acetate, which isn't known to destroy cancer cells. Another form of vitamin E, called alpha-tocopheryl succinate, has been associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer, in much smaller doses.

    If you take vitamin E supplements for any reason, tell your doctor. If you aren't sure which form of vitamin E you take, bring the container to your doctor or pharmacist and ask. 
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Gastroenterology, answered
    This is a complex group including four tocopherols and four tocotrienols known as alpha, beta, gamma, and delta for both. Take a multivitamin  that preferably has 80 mg of mixed natural tocopherols and tocotrienols (with at least 10 mg of tocotrienols). An alternative is to take a multivitamin with 400 IU of mixed natural tocopherols a day. Avoid products with synthetic dl-alpha-tocopherol or d-alpha-tocopherol.
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    A , Integrative Medicine, answered
    Vitamin E protects cholesterol from being turned into a sticky form that attaches to the walls of arteries. In doing so, vitamin E may help to prevent the formation of arterial plaques. This lowers the incidence of coronary artery disease and fatal heart attacks. Vitamin E is also a powerful anti-clotting agent, which helps blood flow through arteries more easily when fatty plaques are already present. Vitamin E is found naturally in nuts, vegetable oils, whole grains, egg yolks and leafy green vegetables.