Viral Infections

Viral Infections

Viral Infections
Viral infections like herpes simplex, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), chicken pox and rotavirus are infections caused by a virus instead of a bacterium. Viral infections do not respond to antibiotics, but some specific viruses like influenza A and B can be treated with certain antiviral medications. Most commonly, treatment for viral infections includes drinking lots of fluids, getting rest, eating well and letting the illness run its course.

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    If you have warts and plantar warts you should call your doctor for the following reasons.
    • Your plantar warts do not improve with treatment. In some cases, your doctor may want to perform a biopsy to rule out other possible causes of the warts.
    • Your warts do not respond to self-care and you would like your doctor to remove them.
    • You have signs of infection, including redness, pus, discharge, red streaking, fever and bleeding, especially bleeding that doesn't stop when you apply pressure.
    • Your wart causes pain.
    • Your warts are spreading.
    • You have anal and/or genital warts.
    • You have diabetes or a weakened immune system and you develop warts.
    • The wart starts to look or feel different or changes color.
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    In most cases, doctors can diagnose molluscum contagiosum just by looking at the bumps on the skin. However, if the doctor cannot make a positive diagnosis, a sample from the area can be taken to examine more closely.

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    When a doctor diagnoses lymphadenopathy, he or she will ask you about the symptoms you're having, like sort throat, fever, location of the swollen lymph nodes, and when the swelling began. Your doctor will also ask about your exposure to certain illnesses like colds or chicken pox. Doctors will use this information to figure out a possible cause of your condition. In some cases, a lymph node biopsy might be performed to rule out certain conditions.

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    Ruptured spleen: Many patients with mononucleosis caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) develop an enlarged spleen. In extreme cases, the spleen may rupture. This is most likely to happen if the person participates in rigorous physical activities while he/she is sick. Patients who rupture their spleens typically experience a sharp and sudden pain in the upper-left side of the abdomen. If this type of pain develops, patients should be taken to the nearest hospital immediately. A ruptured spleen generally requires surgery.

    Nerve problems: Complications of the nervous system are rare, but may include nerve damage, seizures, behavioral changes, inflammation of the brain (called encephalitis), and inflammation of the tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord (called meningitis).

    Blocked airways: In rare cases, the lymph nodes in the neck may become extremely large and block the airways. This may make it difficult for the patient to breathe.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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    The effects of encephalitis on the body may include paralysis, poor coordination, and fatigue. Hearing problems and vision trouble may also be experienced. Serious cases of encephalitis can cause a person to suffer respiratory arrest, or to stop breathing. In some cases, encephalitis leads to coma and death.

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    Because the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is extremely common, and some individuals can carry and spread the virus intermittently throughout their lives, it is almost impossible to prevent an infection. That is why more than 95% of American adults have been infected with EBV at some point in their lives.

    Avoiding close contact with individuals who have contagious illnesses may help reduce the risk of acquiring infections. Practicing good hygiene, regularly washing the hands with soap and warm water, and using hand sanitizers may help reduce the risk of acquiring infections.

    Individuals should not share kitchen utensils with individuals who have EBV, unless they are properly cleaned with soap and warm water first.

    Individuals should not share food or beverages with individuals who have EBV.

    Individuals should not open-mouth kiss individuals who have EBV.

    Individuals who have been diagnosed with mononucleosis should not donate blood for at least six months after the onset of the infection.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    You can ask your doctor about ways to prevent getting lymphadenopathy. If your swollen lymph nodes were caused by an infection, ask your physician about lifestyle changes. He or she might recommend changes you could make that might reduce your risk of getting it again.

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    If you have lymphadenopathy, you may experience swollen, tender, or painful lymph nodes, especially in the head and neck. Other symptoms may include a sore throat, fever, and reddening of the skin over the nodes. Enlarged lymph nodes in other parts of your body could indicate a more serious condition like HIV or lupus.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Children are susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus infection as soon as the mother's protective immunity wanes. When very young children are exposed they may experience mild symptoms or none at all. The symptoms of EBV infection are not unique and mimic many run-of-the-mill childhood infections that also cause sore throat, fever and swollen glands.

    Infections that occur later can produce a wide range of symptoms if any at all. It may take between 30-50 days for symptoms to appear.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    If your child has roseola, clean her skin by running a towel or sponge soaked with lukewarm water over her body.

    Roseola is yet another childhood illness that affects children by the age of two. It produces a high fever and a pink, spotty rash that spreads throughout the child's body. Although roseola may make your child irritable and fussy, the viral infection is not serious and should go away within a week.