Turmeric

Turmeric

Turmeric
Turmeric, an herbal supplement, is known for its anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and antioxidant properties. Health benefits of turmeric include treatment of indigestion, ulcers and osteoarthritis. Turmeric contains curcumin and is a yellow-orange powdery substance. Learn more about turmeric from our experts

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Turmeric is an amazing substance. It is used medicinally to prevent and treat a variety of health issues. Unless you use it in massive quantities there aren't any real side effects.

    Of course, if you are allergic to turmeric you shouldn't use it topically or ingest it. If you've never used it before, it's a good idea to rub a small amount on your skin and look for a rash before you consume turmeric orally. Due to its ability reduce the clotting of blood, if you're being treated with medications for high blood pressure or with other blood-thinning drugs, you should avoid using turmeric. And like any other medicine or herb, there can be interactions between drugs so check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other substances.

    The Federal Drug Administration (FDA) has not yet issued any recommendation regarding turmeric. However, a similar governing body in Germany has declared turmeric hazardous only to those suffering from biliary obstruction. It has also cautioned those with ulcers or gallstones or other gastrointestinal ailments to avoid turmeric.

    Studies have concluded that ingesting vast amounts of turmeric is harmful to red and white blood cells. However, the amount of turmeric involved is enormous to cause this type of damage. It also should be noted that the effects of turmeric on pregnant and nursing women are unknown.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Green and black teas contain flavonoids, antioxidant compounds thought to block the production of a type of prostaglandin that exacerbates inflammation and pain.

    Try adding turmeric to your tea for an extra dose of relief. For centuries, this deep-yellow spice (common in Indian dishes) has been used to treat wounds, infections and other health problems. In recent years, researchers have attributed antioxidant, anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral properties to curcumin, the compound responsible for turmeric’s yellow pigment, as well. Turmeric tea is thought to lubricate the joints and help relieve pain in arthritis, bursitis and tendonitis sufferers—or in anyone with chronic joint pain.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Gastroenterology, answered
    How can turmeric aid in digestion and benefit gut health?
    The benefits of turmeric include encouraging digestive and gut health, healing inflammation, and boosting immunity. Watch as integrative gastroenterologist Robynne Chutkan, MD, shares all the healthy benefits of adding turmeric to your diet. 
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    A ginger-like plant that has curcumin as its active ingredient, turmeric seems to activate PPARs (substances that have an anti-inflammatory effect). Just add the right dose—a pinch (1/8 of a teaspoon). Add any more and your food will taste like mustard.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Turmeric is a spice that contains a powerful, natural anti-inflammatory compound. That makes it intriguing, since chronic inflammation raises the risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death for people with diabetes. It has long been part of curry spice blends used in southern Asian cuisines. Turmeric is also available as a dietary supplement.

    It's considered safe for most adults, but in very high doses, it may cause indigestion, nausea, or diarrhea. It is advised that people with gallbladder disease not take turmeric as a supplement.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    While it may be possible to develop a sensitivity to turmeric, it would be considered highly unusual. More often what might be considered a symptom of sensitivity to turmeric supplement, like upset stomach or diarrhea, is not caused by an allergic reaction. However, if you experience any symptoms of allergic reaction (trouble breathing, itching, dizziness, palpitations, etc.), seek medical help. Allergic reactions associated with turmeric usually take the form of contact dermatitis, as when tumeric is used in therapeutic massage oil. 
  • 2 Answers
    A

    Maybe you don't recognize its name, but if you've ever eaten mustard or curry you've certainly sampled a taste. Unique in its flavor and distinguished by its yellow color, turmeric is a spice used across the globe in foods and as a dye in the textile industry.

    Turmeric is made from a plant native to India known as the Curcuma longa plant. The rhizomes or roots of the plant are first harvested, then boiled, dried, and finally ground up into a fine powder. Not only is turmeric used to heighten taste of food or to color fabrics, it has also been used for centuries in traditional eastern cultures and Ayuredic medicine. It's even been used to make a paste and when applied to the face and subsequently scrubbed off, turmeric can remove facial hair. Scientists throughout the world are now studying turmeric's potential to treat an assortment of medical ailments.

    Turmeric is recognized for its medical anti-inflammatory properties as well as a powerful antioxidant. Researchers are evaluating its use to treat high cholesterol, rheumatoid arthritis, scabies and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Additionally, it is possible it may help in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease and various forms of cancer. Some people use turmeric to treat diarrhea and bladder infections.

    There's still much to learn about turmeric and its potential use as a medicine as research continues.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Herbal Medicine, answered

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a commonly used culinary spice in India and the Middle East. It is historically known as Indian Saffron. Turmeric is often used to prepare Indian curries, and it’s the source of our popular American condiment mustard’s bright yellow color. Turmeric, a rhizome and a close relative of the adaptogenic herb ginger has been used as both medicine and food for centuries.

    In its natural state, turmeric is a horizontally shaped rhizome (root) which is dug up out of the ground, baked and then ground into a fine powder. Recent studies suggest that turmeric is a promising preventive agent for a wide range of diseases, most likely due largely to its anti-inflammatory properties. The chief active compound in turmeric is curcumin.

    The health benefits of Turmeric have been recognized by Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine for hundreds of years. That’s a long time! As far as health benefits go, here are some common ailments and diseases that turmeric can help fight against:

    • Indigestion
    • Flatulence
    • Arthritis
    • Alzheimer’s Disease
    • Cancer
    • Diabetes
    • HIV
    • High Cholesterol
    • Heartburn
    • Jaundice
    • Liver Disorders
    • Menstrual disorders
    • Turmeric can also be applied topically in poultices to reduce inflammation and to relieve wounds, cuts, and bruises.

    TIP: Sick with a cold or flu? Turmeric’s anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal agents can help your body fight against colds, cough and flu. When symptoms of these infections are present, simply mix one teaspoon of Turmeric powder into a glass of warm milk once per day. Also drink plenty of water throughout the day.

    Now, that’s an impressive list! If you’re looking for a simple New Year’s resolution for health, I suggest you add turmeric to your diet.

    To make that easier for you, here is a tasty recipe to try from www.naturalnews.com:

    Anti-Inflammatory Lemonade:

    Ingredients:

    • 1 cup of fresh squeezed lemon juice (approximately 4 -6 lemons)
    • 4-6 cups of clean water (to taste)
    • 1 teaspoon organic ground turmeric
    • 1 teaspoon organic ground cinnamon
    • pinch Himalayan salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon liquid stevia (or to taste)
    • 1 tsp. ground or fresh ginger, optional

    Directions:

    • Combine ingredients and enjoy!
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    1MinBetterHealth 033 Turmeric
    There is a brain-busting spice that can keep your brain in tip-top shape. Find out from Dr. Oz what spice is called the "spice of life" in this video.



    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    The active component in turmeric is called curcumin. If you are a fan of curry, you will be happy to know that this substance is associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and has been associated with relief for joint pain. In one randomized control study, 107 patients with knee osteoarthritis received either 800 mg per day ibuprofen or 2 grams per day Curcuma domestica extract. Both groups showed improvement in pain during level walking and climbing stairs.
    See All 2 Answers