Smoking Treatment

Smoking Treatment

Smoking Treatment
If you have an addiction to smoking, it is best to recognize the problem and work on a plan to stop smoking for your overall health improvement. To quit smoking, you can create motivational tips for weaning yourself off cigarettes by a certain date and replacing that habit with a healthier habit such as walking or chewing sugar-free gum. Learn more from our experts how to create a cessation plan.

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    Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and other medicines have been proven to double a person's chances of quitting smoking. Nicotine dependence develops fairly rapidly -- often within six months of regular use. NRT comes in gum, patches, lozenges, pills, inhalers and nasal sprays. They are lower concentrations of nicotine and may not have the other 7,000 chemicals and chemical compounds found in cigarettes.
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    A , Oncology, answered
    Lozenges that contain tobacco (like Ariva and Interval), and small, pouches of tobacco (like Revel and Exalt) are being sold as other ways for smokers to get nicotine in places where smoking is not allowed. The FDA has ruled that these are types of oral tobacco products much like snuff and chew, and are not smoking cessation aids. There is no evidence that these products can help a person quit smoking. Unlike scientifically proven treatments with known effects, such as nicotine replacement products, anti-depressants, nicotine receptor blockers, or behavioral therapy, these oral tobacco products have never been tested to see if they can help people quit tobacco.
    We know that oral tobacco products such as snuff and chewing tobacco contain human carcinogens. These products cause mouth cancer and gum disease. They also destroy the bone sockets around teeth and can cause teeth to fall out. There are studies showing potential harmful effects on the heart and circulation, as well as increased risks of other cancers. They also cause bad breath and stain the teeth.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    The following side effects are serious and require immediate medical attention: chest pain, irregular heartbeats, and seizures. Less serious side effects are: belching, hiccups, dizziness, stomach upset, nausea, sore throat or mouth, watering or dry mouth, watering eyes, headache, sores or white patches inside the mouth or on the lips, sneezing, constipation, coughing, jaw and neck pain, acid indigestion, diarrhea, fever, gas, flu-like symptoms, nasal inflammation, sinus inflammation, tooth disorders, and changes in taste. Symptoms of an allergic reaction require emergency treatment. They are: difficulty breathing, hives, and  swelling of the lips, tongue, throat, or face. There may be other side effects not listed here.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Nicotine replacement therapy should be used by people who smoke more than 15 cigarettes per day and who want to quit. It can also be used by smokeless tobacco users. Nicotine replacement therapy makes permanent smoking cessation ten times more likely.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    There are a number of nicotine replacement therapy products that all work by delivering low levels of nicotine to the body to curb the craving for cigarettes or smokeless tobacco. Some, like nicotine gum, lozenges, or skin patches, are available as over-the-counter medications. Others, like nicotine inhalers or nasal sprays, can only be acquired by prescription.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Nicotine nasal spray can affect other medications that you take on a regular basis. Stopping or starting smoking can also have this effect on medications. Talk to your doctor if you are taking the following medications: acetaminophen, imipramine, beta blockers, oxazepam, labetalol, prazosin, theophylline, pentazocine, insulin, isoproterenol, oxymetazoline, phenylephrine, or products containing caffeine. Do not smoke while using this product. There may be other drugs that interact with nicotine nasal spray. Inform your doctor about any prescription, over-the-counter drugs, or nutritional or herbal supplements you are taking.
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    Nicotine-replacement products that are used to help you quit smoking have been shown to be safe. They contain only nicotine, and even when used “as needed” throughout the day, usually provide smaller amounts than cigarettes. More importantly, they do not contain the thousands of other chemicals that are in cigarettes, many of which are known to cause cancer. Choosing to use nicotine-replacement products, even in the long-term, to help you quit smoking is much safer than continuing to smoke.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    The purpose of the gum is three-fold. First, it removes the smoking experience. Many people become addicted to the ritual of smoking cigarettes. Second, it removes the risk of exposure to cancer-causing chemicals that are produced by the burning tobacco leaves. Third, it allows one to slowly adjust the total amount of nicotine in blood and brain to lower and lower levels until the brain can adjust to the absence of nicotine and the craving for nicotine slowly dissipates. 
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    A Pulmonary Disease, answered on behalf of

    There are very few side effects to using nicotine gum or lozenges if they are used correctly. The gum should be chewed until soft and parked between the cheek and gums. Lozenges should be parked under the tongue. Some people experience mouth soreness, hiccups or heartburn when they first start using nicotine gum or lozenge. This might be a sign that the dose is too high, or that the technique might need some adjustment.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    When using nicotine lozenges, gum, skin patches, inhalers, and nasal spray, you risk having an allergic reaction or experiencing some side effects, which can range from mild to severe. If you smoke while using a nicotine replacement product, you run the risk of a nicotine overdose. There is also a risk that using a nicotine replacement product might cause a pre-existing medical condition to worsen. However, you may be able to address this risk by choosing a specific kind of nicotine product that can best be used with your condition. For example, if you have mouth or dental problems, you might choose a nicotine patch rather than nicotine gum or lozenges.