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How should I manage my child's hives?

Make a list of everything that your child ate (such as food or medication) or
touched several hours before the rash appeared, as well as any recent bee stings or illnesses.

Take the list to your pediatrician to help identify any potential cause for the hives, and often more pressing at the moment, discuss how to take the
itch out of the situation.

Your pediatrician may recommend giving an oral antihistamine (like Benadryl) to offer some relief.

In cases in which hives keep showing up or are particularly itchy, you may want to get additional advice about using a non-sedating antihistamine around the clock for a few days because the use of regular antihistamines can
make children quite drowsy.

If you have an allergic infant or child, it is wise to be prepared and have an antihistamine on hand at all times, just in case.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.