Skin Disorders

Skin Disorders

Skin Disorders
Skin disorders affect people of all ages. Rashes, cysts, breakouts, redness and blisters all can be symptoms of conditions as varied as hives, rosacea, psoriasis, eczema and acne. Talk to your doctor or a dermatologist about any lasting symptoms to find the appropriate treatment. A doctor also can recommend the proper therapy for conditions like brown spots, spider veins, and fungal infections.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    As hairs often become ingrown because they curl around and re-enter the pores from which they exit, it's a logical conclusion that those with curly hair are more likely to notice this issue. But those who shave often are also putting themselves at higher risk -- irritating the skin and leaving behind hairs with sharp ends are also known to produce ingrown hairs.

     

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Talk to a dermatologist about the best way to cleanse your skin if you have a rash. The way you care for your skin may depend on the type of rash you have and what caused it. The dermatologist may recommend that you:
    • Bathe in lukewarm or cool water -- not hot water.
    • Wash with a mild unscented cleanser formulated for sensitive skin.
    • Pat the skin dry with a soft, clean towel. Avoid rubbing.
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    Your child may have one or more of these in the area:

    • Redness
    • Tenderness
    • Swelling
    • Increased warmth

    Your child may also have a fever (temperature over 100.30F)

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     If your child’s abscess or boil needs to be cut open to drain, he may need medicine to make him relaxed and sleepy (sedation).

    • Pain medicines or sedatives (anxiety medicines) may be used.
    • These medicines can help your child stay calm, be able to lie still and have less pain.
    • They may be given by mouth or through an IV (intravenous) line.

    If you know ahead of time that your child is coming into the ED or clinic to have the abscess or boil drained, do not give him anything to eat or drink for 4-5 hours before coming in. If your child needs sedation, the doctor and nurse will give you more information.

    Your child’s abscess or boil may be packed with gauze or have a drain in it once it is cut open. This helps to keep the area open and draining longer. It also helps to keep pus from filling up inside again.

    Some general treatment guidelines to follow at home include:

    • Wash your hands well with soap and water for 15 seconds before and after treating your child.
    • You do not need to do anything to the abscess or boil for the first 24 hours.
    • If there is no packing or drain - soak the area in warm, soapy water 2-3 times a day for the next several days. This will help it to keep draining.
    • If there is packing or a drain or if you cannot soak the area easily - apply warm, wet compresses instead.
    • After soaking, dry the area. Apply a thin layer of antibiotic ointment and a bandage. Keep the area covered until it stops draining and closes over.
    • Give your child antibiotics (medicines used to kill germs) if prescribed by the doctor. If so, take them for the entire time prescribed.
    • Give acetaminophen (Tylenol, or less costly store brand) or ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil or less costly store brand) for fever or pain if advised by your doctor. Follow the directions on the box carefully or ask your child’s doctor how much medicine to give.

    DO NOT:

    Give your child more than 5 doses of acetaminophen in a 24-hour period.

    Give acetaminophen to babies younger than 3 months old without talking with your child’s doctor.

    Give ibuprofen to babies younger than 6 months old without talking with your child’s doctor.

    Give acetaminophen and ibuprofen together.

    Alternate these medicines.

    • The doctor may prescribe other pain medicines. If so, take them as your doctor directs.
    • If the area was packed or a drain was placed, follow your doctor’s instructions for further treatment.
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    Doctors aren't sure what causes the follicle blockage that leads to hidradenitis suppurativa, so there is no real way to prevent it. However, avoiding certain lifestyle factors may help ease the symptoms of this condition. These factors include obesity, wearing tight clothing, and smoking cigarettes.

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    It is dangerous for people with diabetes to get boils for a number of reasons. High levels of blood glucose encourage bacterial growth and, therefore, infection. Boils disrupt our natural skin barrier and lead to this bacterial invasion.
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of
    Occupational Dermatitis is not one particular type of eczema. It is any type of eczema caused by a person's workplace. Occupational Dermatitis has unique causes. A very large percentage of people develop eczema on the job (eczemanet website). A patient will need a thorough medical exam and skin exam to determine what type of eczema/allergic reaction he/she has.
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    Cheilitis is diagnosed in different ways according to the type of cheilitis you suspect you have. For actinic cheilitis, your doctor will check your medical history and perform a biopsy. Angular cheilitis is diagnosed through a single clinical examination. Granulomatous cheilitis is diagnosed through a lab test. For contact cheilitis, your doctor will ask for your medical history and take a patch test of the skin or lips the cheilitis is affecting.

  • 2 Answers
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    For some children, dermatitis -- a term that covers many different disorders, all of which result in itchy skin -- will clear up by the adolescent years. For others, it can be a lifelong condition. The outcome depends on the type of dermatitis the child has and the child’s response to treatment. Talk to your child's doctor about his or her dermatitis.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    We don’t really know. Since no one knows what causes it exactly, we don’t know if it can be prevented. We know that you can’t get it by touching someone with the rash and it is not caused by a bacteria or fungus. Most experts have a hunch that it’s caused by a virus (maybe a herpes virus), but no one is 100% sure yet. The good news is if you get it once, you will probably never get it again.

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