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Who gets shingles?

Dr. Mehmet Oz, MD
Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease)
Anyone can get shingles, but some people have a greater risk than others. For starters, your chance of getting shingles increases with each passing year, especially once you turn 40. The risk continues to rise as you age. A person who is 60 is 10 times more likely to develop shingles than a child who is 10, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. A small number of children are at risk for pediatric shingles. An infant whose mother developed chickenpox just before giving birth has an increased risk for developing shingles as a small child.

You are also more likely to develop shingles if your immune system is weakened or not working properly. That includes people who have human immunodeficiency disease (HIV), certain types of cancer, and other diseases. People whose poor immune function makes them vulnerable to shingles may also develop severe, long-term symptoms.

Talk with your doctor about your risk for developing shingles.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.