Prostate Cancer Treatment

Prostate Cancer Treatment

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    How far out is personalized treatment for prostate cancer?
    Researchers are trying to develop tests to determine which prostate cancers are aggressive. In this video, William Oh, MD, an oncologist at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses the future of prostate cancer treatment.
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    Fatigue is common after prostate surgery (even the minimally invasive kind) and should start to subside in a few weeks.

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    Every newly diagnosed man over 60 with prostate cancer should know about active surveillance. Prostate cancer typically grows very slowly. Men should know that, for the vast majority of patients, it is usually very safe to be followed closely for a number of years without treatment. Furthermore, men should know that, even in the best of hands, at least 40% of men who are treated with surgery or radiation will have some side effects, usually affecting their sexual or urinary health.
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    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    Many substances used as complementary therapies for prostate cancer, such as vitamins and particular nutrients, are found naturally in food. Men seeking to reduce their risk of developing prostate cancer or other health problems should eat a healthful diet and engage in regular physical activity. These lifestyle habits offer the best all-around protection because they reduce the risk of the No. 1 threat to men -- heart

    Because the evidence of effectiveness is so limited -- and because of the potential for harm -- many experts recommend tossing out any herbal remedies, multivitamins, and vitamin supplements you take (except vitamin D supplements), unless they were prescribed by a physician.
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    Removal of your Foley catheter typically takes place in your doctor's office one to two weeks after the date of your surgery. An X-ray test of the bladder and urethra (called a cystogram) is rarely requested to confirm that the bladder and urethra are healed prior to removal of the Foley catheter. Prior to your discharge from the hospital, you will be given complete postoperative instructions by your surgeon.
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    If I’m young and I have prostate cancer, what should I do?
    Young patients with prostate cancer should see several specialists to discuss what kind of treatment -- if any -- you should receive. In this video, William Oh, MD, an oncologist at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, explains which doctors you should see.
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    Treatment for intermediate-risk prostate cancer includes:
    • surgery
    • radiation
    • seed implant
    • active surveillance
    A combination of surgery and radiation is also possible for treatment.
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    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    About one-third of American men with prostate cancer use at least one form of herbal or "natural" remedy -- and that figure doesn't include men who use acupuncture, massage, or another complementary therapy. Although statistics are harder to find for how many men use complementary therapies for other prostate conditions and their side effects, a wide array of products are promoted for these conditions, suggesting that there are many who do. Even so, the issue of complementary therapies doesn't often come up during a visit to the physician. Patients tend not to mention the nonprescription therapies they are using, and doctors may not ask about them. Please let your physician know if you are taking these supplements.
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    Radiation therapy uses targeted energy to kill cancer cells, shrink tumors and provide relief of certain cancer-related symptoms. Radiation therapy is a preferred treatment option for prostate cancer patients. Highly targeted radiation treatments are used to kill tumors, along with other innovative therapies, like hormone therapy and immunotherapy, which fight against the growth of new cancer cells.

    Radiation oncologists deliver high radiation doses to cancerous cells in the prostate, while sparing healthy tissue and organs. By focusing the radiation directly on the tumor, these therapies minimize the risk of developing radiation side effects commonly associated with prostate cancer treatment, like incontinence and erectile dysfunction.
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    Physicians and researchers are continuously seeking new ways to improve surgical techniques and reduce side effects without compromising the ability to cure the cancer. Recent advances include surgical techniques to reduce nerve injury during surgery, medications that may enable the nerves to regenerate more quickly; and the study of alternate medical therapies to help maximize the ability of damaged nerves.

    Because prostate surgery is not an ideal option for every man with prostate cancer, researchers continue to evaluate and explore alternate forms of treatment, in the hope of improving their efficacy and reducing their side effects.

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