Prostate Cancer Treatment

Prostate Cancer Treatment

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    Active monitoring is a trend that appears to be growing among men with prostate cancer. It involves regular doctor visits, physical exams of the prostate, occasional biopsies and blood tests to check prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. The PSA test is now widely used to track progression of the prostate cancer. About 40 to 50 percent of men with early prostate cancer in the US now opt for active monitoring.

    This content originally appeared online at Baptist Health South Florida.
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    A Radiation Oncology, answered on behalf of
    Most of the complications that arise from radiation usually involve the bladder and the rectum. Some of the radiation, despite the best technology, is going to go to the bladder and rectum, given the fact that the prostate is located between them. So a small percentage of patients may retain some of the side effects they may have experienced during treatment. For instance, there may be trouble with the bladder, such as urinary frequency, a burning sensation during urination, or a sense of urgency. Rectal symptoms may include frequency, urgency, looser stools, or irregularity. In the vast majority of patients who undergo radiation treatment, side effects slowly subside over time, but there’s a small percentage of patients who experience chronic side effects from radiation therapy.
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    Will robotic surgery for prostate cancer help me regain continence faster?
    Robotic surgery is able to do reconstructive surgery on the prostate, allowing people to regain their continence, says Kenneth Stallman, MD, with Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital. In this video, he explains the robotic surgery procedure.
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    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    Chemotherapy drugs for prostate cancer are given in pill form or intravenously. They are usually taken in cycles, with each period of treatment followed by a rest period. This cycle can be daily, weekly, or every three to four weeks, depending on the drug and your tolerance. Combinations of chemotherapy drugs are often more effective than single drugs, but even these combinations aren't particularly effective for advanced hormone-refractory prostate cancer.
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    A answered

    Some loss of urinary control is quite common after prostate surgery. The loss of control may be simply an occasional dripping when you put pressure on the bladder (such as when you cough or exert), or it may occur more often, requiring the use of pads or clamps to control it. How would this make you feel? Could you live with it and not let it bother you, or would it be so embarrassing that it could affect your social or business life? Complete incontinence (continuous dripping) is very unlikely, but there is up to a 25% chance of having some urinary problem after surgery. You have to understand this possibility if you agree to treatment. 

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    The treatment options for prostate cancer are contingent on the following factors:
    • the stage of the cancer, whether it affects only part of the prostate, the whole prostate, or has spread to other areas of the body;
    • the patient's overall state-of-health and age;
    • whether the cancer has just been diagnosed or whether it is a reoccurrence.
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    What is focal therapy for prostate cancer?
    Focal therapy is a general term for a variety of techniques for destroying small tumors inside the prostate. In this video, Simon Hall, MD, chair of the Urology Department at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, discusses focal therapy options.
     
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    A robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is a minimally invasive (as is non-robotic laparoscopic prostate surgery) operation for prostate cancer. Only one or two small incisions are made for the whole prostate operation. This means less risk of infection, less pain, reduced blood loss and faster recovery. The robotic system provides the doctor with a magnified, 3-D view of the entire area around the prostate so the doctor can remove—with great precision—cancerous tissue without damaging surrounding nerves. The skill is in the surgeon, not the machine.

    Some studies report that robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) is associated with earlier return of urinary function, an improved outlook for potency over the traditional open prostatectomy, and, most importantly, improved cancer control. Other studies find no difference or a better outcome without robotic surgery. It's important to note that with a robot, the operation may take 50% longer to complete, so you're exposed to more anesthesia and other drugs. Your best bet is to ask your surgeon about his or her outcomes and rate of complications. If he or she does not provide outcome information, get another surgeon.
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    A Urology, answered on behalf of
    One risk of active surveillance of prostate cancer is anxiety. Some men aren't comfortable with the idea of watching and waiting with cancer. Stress-reduction techniques can mitigate this, and doctors try to provide reassurance with regular biopsies and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing.

    The biggest risk men are worried about is that the cancer will spread beyond the confines of the prostate gland and result in death. That has not been a major concern in most of the studies to date. Research suggests that suggested that there is perhaps a 1% increased risk in death in men who seek treatment after active surveillance of prostate cancer compared with those who seek immediate care.
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    A , Hematology & Oncology, answered
    The Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) approved two drugs shown to help men with advanced prostate cancer live longer: the prostate cancer "vaccine" sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and the chemotherapy drug cabazitaxel (Jevtana). An earlier medication that was approved was docetaxel. The FDA has also approved abiraterone (Zytiga) as a hormonal therapy. There is also a class of drugs called GnRH antagonists, which includes degarelix (Firmagon) or abarelix (Plenaxis), which are used in US and Europe.