Poisoning
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Poison Prevention

Poison comes in many forms -- including some you may not recognize. Test your knowledge about hidden poison dangers with our quiz.

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Poison Prevention
Poison Prevention
Question 1 of 20 Correct

What age group of people are at the greatest risk for accidental poisoning?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Children under the age of 6 are at the greatest risk for accidental poisonings. That's because children explore by putting everything they come into contact with into their mouths. As a baby's mobility increases, so does the risk for poisoning.

Poison Prevention
Question 2 of 20 Correct

What forms can poison take?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Poison comes in four forms: solids (such as pills or food supplements), liquids (such as gasoline or alcohol), sprays (such as household spray cleaners) and gases (such as carbon monoxide). To speed treatment and reduce the risk of complications, it helps to know what kind of poison you've come into contact with.

Poison Prevention
Question 3 of 20 Correct

Which of these kitchen cleaners is potentially harmful?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Many common kitchen cleaners, including dishwashing soaps and window and glass cleaners, are potentially harmful. If swallowed, some can be even fatal.

Poison Prevention
Question 4 of 20 Correct

Which of the following are possible signs of poisoning?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Depending on the type of poison and how it's been ingested, a person might experience any of these symptoms: nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, abnormal skin color, chest or abdominal pain, trouble breathing, sweating, changes in consciousness, seizures, headaches, dizziness, weakness, irregular pupil size, burning or tearing eyes or burns around the lips, tongue or on the skin.

Poison Prevention
Question 5 of 20 Correct

True or false: Every state has its own Poison Control hotline number.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Every poison center in the country has the same number: 1-800-222-1222. You can call this number 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for help with a poison emergency or questions about poison prevention.

Poison Prevention
Question 6 of 20 Correct

If a mercury thermometer breaks, how should you clean it up to prevent accidental poisoning?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: NEVER touch spilled mercury, and do not throw mercury-containing or mercury-glass thermometers in the trash. Mercury is considered hazardous waste, so call your local household hazardous waste hotline or health department for instructions on how to dispose of it.

Poison Prevention
Question 7 of 20 Correct

True or false: Non-prescription medications do not need to be in child-resistant containers.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Even in small doses, over-the-counter medicines can be dangerous. Store them in their original child-resistant bottles and out of the reach of children.

Poison Prevention
Question 8 of 20 Correct

True or false: It's usually OK to take expired medicines if they're less than 30 days out of date.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Over time, expired medications can become toxic, so throw them out when they reach the expiration date.

Poison Prevention
Question 9 of 20 Correct

How should you dispose of expired medication?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: If possible, take them to your city or county government's household trash and recycling service for proper disposal. Or mix the pills with an undesirable substance such as kitty litter, used coffee grounds or other garbage. Wrap it in a plastic bag and toss it in the trash.

Poison Prevention
Question 10 of 20 Correct

True or false: Over-the-counter medicines are made with such low doses that you cannot overdose or get sick from them.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Even though over-the-counter medications can be purchased without a prescription, some products can be dangerous to pets and children if swallowed -- even in small quantities. For example, even small quantities of aspirin, a common OTC painkiller, can be deadly in small children.

Poison Prevention
Question 11 of 20 Correct

True or false: Vitamins can be poisonous.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Vitamins, especially ones that contain iron, can be poisonous. Treat vitamins and supplements as you would prescription medicines and store them out of the reach of children.

Poison Prevention
Question 12 of 20 Correct

True or false: You can keep household chemicals and pesticides in any container, as long as you mark it as poison.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Keep products in their original containers with the lids tightly secured. Never use emptied food containers, as children and others may mistake chemicals or products as food or beverage.

Poison Prevention
Question 13 of 20 Correct

True or false: Household chemicals and pesticides should be stored in locked cabinets.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is true. Keep all pesticides and harmful household cleaners out of the reach of children and pets and in a locked cabinet.

Poison Prevention
Question 14 of 20 Correct

A periodic survey of all household cleaning and pesticide products should check for what?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: It's important to conduct a home survey of all household cleaning and pesticide products periodically. Be sure to check for loose caps. Also, properly dispose of out-of-date products.

Poison Prevention
Question 15 of 20 Correct

True or false: If you need to dispose of any chemicals or pesticides, wrap them in a plastic bag and toss them in with regular trash.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Never dispose of potentially hazardous products by pouring them on the ground, in a stream, down the sink, into the toilet or down a sewer or by tossing them in the trash. Call your local solid waste management authority, environmental agency or health department before you dispose of leftover or unwanted household products or pesticides.

Poison Prevention
Question 16 of 20 Correct

True or false: You will be able to detect carbon monoxide before it begins poisoning you.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Carbon monoxide is odorless and colorless. Therefore it is often called "the silent killer." The best way to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning is to install a carbon monoxide detector in your home that can alert you to possible leaks.

Poison Prevention
Question 17 of 20 Correct

Which of these are poisons that can be absorbed through the skin?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: All of the above. Poisons that can be absorbed through the skin come from many sources including plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac; fertilizers; and pesticides.

Poison Prevention
Question 18 of 20 Correct

True or false: If you think your child has been poisoned, give him syrup of ipecac to make him vomit up the poison.

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: This is false. Do not give your child syrup of ipecac to make him vomit up the poison. Vomiting may cause further injury. Instead call your local poison control center and ask for guidance on treating his suspected poisoning.

Poison Prevention
Question 19 of 20 Correct

If someone has come into skin or eye contact with poison, which first aid treatment is needed to stop the effects of the poisoning?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: If someone has come into skin or eye contact with poison, rinse the eyes or skin for 15 to 20 minutes with tap water. This will help flush the poison from the area.

Poison Prevention
Question 20 of 20 Correct

If you go to the emergency room for treatment, should you bring the suspected poison with you?

Correct! Sorry, that’s incorrect.

The correct answer is: Yes, as long as it's safe for you and others. For example, you shouldn't bring any chemicals that are giving off a poisonous gas or any containers that are leaking. But if the possible poison is a bottle of pills or a household chemical in a safe, secured jar or can, bring it with you to the doctor's office or emergency room. This can help speed up treatment as healthcare providers know quickly what they're treating.

Poison Prevention
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Poison Prevention
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Poisoning

Poisoning

Poisoning involves ingesting or coming in contact with substances that damage your body. Typical poisons include household and industrial chemicals, drugs, exhaust fumes, plants, metals or spoiled food. The dangers of poisoning va...

ry widely, from minor annoyances to coma and death. Typical signs of poisoning include rashes, vomiting, redness around the mouth and nose, chemical odors and burns. Empty pill bottles, unresponsiveness and difficulty breathing are also signs. If the person is not breathing, start CPR and call for help immediately. Since poisons work in different ways depending on the amount and type ingested, it is important to consult with a doctor or a poison control center to seek advice for treatment.
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