Parenting Teens

Parenting Teens

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    A , Psychology, answered
    Peer pressure is fierce, and teens say those "Just say no" type lines don't work. So help your adolescent create lines to use with peers that let her save face and buck the pressure of drinking and driving: "My dad will take away my license." "I don't need a ride -- my friend is coming." "My mom will ground me for life -- and she always finds out."
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Peer pressure at parties can be fierce, so help your adolescent learn a few peer pressure strategies to use at a party like “How to gracefully lose a drink,” “How to pretend to take a sip,” or the fine art of “How to do a gentle, ‘unintentional’ spill.”
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    A , Psychology, answered
    How hard you should push your teen into challenging AP classes is always a tough call. However, three things help you make the right decision:

    Previous history: Take into account the child’s past grade in subject as well as the teacher or counselor recommendation. Do they feel your child is capable?

    Kid’s view: Listen to the kid’s “why not” factor to help you determine if there is “just cause for not taking the class. Hear him out. There may be another reason besides “It’s too hard.”

    Check your expectations: Ensure your expectations match your child’s actual abilities. Think of a rubber band: the right expectations stretch your child’s potential without snapping his spirit.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Dr. Jennifer Hartstein - How can I help my child adjust to high school?

    Got a kid heading off to high school? Even though he's almost grown up, he may need a hand getting used to it. In this video, psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein shares tips for helping a child adjust to high school.

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    A , Adolescent Medicine, answered

    Saying goodbye needs to begin approximately 4-6 months prior to them leaving. 

    Be clear as to your own feelings and express them appropriately.

    Carving out a regular weekly/monthly special time with your child will also give you a place to build memories (pictures and videos). Make this a time to focus on the upcoming transition and discuss tools to manage it successfully for all.



     
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    Sextortion is a type of exploitation that involves coercion to extort sexual favors from the victim.  It is also a type of blackmail in which sexual images or videos are used to force sexual favors from the victim. People who sext may find themselves victims of sextortion.  Sex texting, known as "sexting" for short, is basically sending, receiving, or forwarding sexual photos or sexually suggestive messages through text message or email.

    There was some research by the Internet Watch Foundation that estimated that 88% of self-made explicit images are "stolen" from their original upload location, like social networking sites, and are available on other websites, such as porn sites. That’s scary, especially for those who only thought that photo was being shared with a romantic partner. Consider this: McAfee, the anti-software company, did its own study and found that 60% of sexts get leaked.

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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Sexting is becoming more and more common every day, and it's definitely something parents need to be concerned about. Thirty-nine percent of teenagers send or post sexually suggestive messages and 48% say they have received the same type of messages. Children as young as 8 years old are getting sext requests from their classmates! What is going on, and what can we do about this? Our kids will make mistakes, but we've got to help them minimize them as much as possible, because the wrong mistake can have a terrible outcome.
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    A , Psychology, answered

    Tips to protect your child from sexting:

    • Explain the legal ramifications of sexting.  Many teens have been jailed, and placed on probation all because of sexting.  Worse yet, they could be charged with the distribution of child pornography if a sexually explicit picture of a minor is being distributed.
    • Discuss how sexting can have an impact on his/her future.  Many college representatives and prospective job employers search online for information on potential candidates.  If they find something that is detrimental or shows poor judgment, it can actually hurt his/her chances of getting into college or securing a job. 
    • Be upfront with your teen about resisting peer pressure.  Teach them to be confident in who they are and not to feel pressured to do something they know is wrong. 
    • Speak with your teen about not responding impulsively to anything on-line or via text. Filtering can help a trigger happy teen from making a permanent, potentially life altering mistake. Encourage your teen to evaluate the consequences of posting their thoughts or pictures before hitting the send button.
    • Speak about online reputations.  Discuss how sexting may have a detrimental impact on what others will think of them.
    • Be honest about sex.  Speak with them about sex, meaningful relationships, STDs and pregnancy.  You would much rather have this talk in preventative mode rather than after something has already happened. 
    • Speak with your teen about being a responsible digital citizen.  Help your teen understand that messages or pictures sent over the Internet or phones are not private or anonymous. 
    • Discuss the need to periodically monitor pictures on the phone, websites visited and social media sites. 
    • Lastly, encourage an open dialogue between you and your teen. Set aside some time each day to just listen and talk with your teen about what's going on in his/her life. 
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    A study released by the American Public Health Association in 2010 suggests that there is an apparent link between excessive messaging, referred to as "hyper-texting" (over 120 text messages a day) and risky behaviors like binge drinking, using drugs, fighting, and promiscuity. The study was conducted at twenty public high schools in the Cleveland area and based on more than 4,200 confidential surveys completed by the high school students of those schools.

    The study also revealed that those teens who "hypertext" are more susceptible to peer pressure and also have permissive or absent parents. "If parents are monitoring their children's texting and social networking, they're probably monitoring other activities as well," said Dr. Scott Frank, the study's lead author. If your child sends over 3,600 text messages a month, I recommend that you take cell phone and social media monitoring seriously to eliminate any potential exposure to risky behaviors.
  • 4 Answers
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    A , Psychology, answered

    Keep the lines of communication open with your teen or young adult about sexting. Here are some parenting tips to help you begin the conversation:

    Parenting Tips for the Tween/Young Teen:

    • Have a chat with your teen about the repercussions of sexting and the adverse effect it can have on their life. Make sure they know that a click of a button can lead to life altering consequences.
    • The best way to engage a teen in a conversation about sexting is with open ended questions. For example, "What is sexting?", "Do you know anyone who has ever sexted before?", or "Do you know what can happen to those who get exposed for sexting?" You'll get a lot more out of your teen if you ask a question that allows them to answer in their own words rather than "yes" or "no".
    • Establish a cell phone safety contract outlining your rules and expectations for your teen's use of the phone. Be sure to include what kinds of photos are not acceptable. The earlier you do this the better.

    Parenting Advice for the Older Teen/College Student:

    Talk to your son or daughter regarding the dangers of sexting. At this age older teens are trying to emerge into young adulthood. While they want to be viewed as more responsible and mature, they still need your guidance. Have those open and honest conversations with your older teen about the pressures of relationships, making wise decisions, and being safe in the virtual world. Don't try to pull the control card out on an older teen, as it may back fire. If you want them to truly listen to your message, the last thing that you need to do is remind them that you're paying their college tuition and imply cutting them off if they don't abide by your rules. This is also true in situations other than sexting.

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