Parenting Teens

Parenting Teens

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    A , Psychology, answered
    Peer pressure is fierce, and teens say those "Just say no" type lines don't work. So help your adolescent create lines to use with peers that let her save face and buck the pressure of drinking and driving: "My dad will take away my license." "I don't need a ride -- my friend is coming." "My mom will ground me for life -- and she always finds out."
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Peer pressure at parties can be fierce, so help your adolescent learn a few peer pressure strategies to use at a party like “How to gracefully lose a drink,” “How to pretend to take a sip,” or the fine art of “How to do a gentle, ‘unintentional’ spill.”
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Dr. Jennifer Hartstein - How can I help my child adjust to high school?

    Got a kid heading off to high school? Even though he's almost grown up, he may need a hand getting used to it. In this video, psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein shares tips for helping a child adjust to high school.

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    A , Adolescent Medicine, answered

    Saying goodbye needs to begin approximately 4-6 months prior to them leaving. 

    Be clear as to your own feelings and express them appropriately.

    Carving out a regular weekly/monthly special time with your child will also give you a place to build memories (pictures and videos). Make this a time to focus on the upcoming transition and discuss tools to manage it successfully for all.



     
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    A , Psychology, answered
    How hard you should push your teen into challenging AP classes is always a tough call. However, three things help you make the right decision:

    Previous history: Take into account the child’s past grade in subject as well as the teacher or counselor recommendation. Do they feel your child is capable?

    Kid’s view: Listen to the kid’s “why not” factor to help you determine if there is “just cause for not taking the class. Hear him out. There may be another reason besides “It’s too hard.”

    Check your expectations: Ensure your expectations match your child’s actual abilities. Think of a rubber band: the right expectations stretch your child’s potential without snapping his spirit.
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Thirty-nine percent of teens have admitted to sexting (sending a sexual text message or sexually explicit photo by text message) and 51 percent of teen girls feel pressured to send explicit photos, with the numbers increasing at an alarming rate. "Not my child" is what parents want to believe. But the statistics show there are many teens participating in this racy and growing trend of sexting.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Dr. Jennifer Hartstein - Why might a teen engage in sexting?

    As many as 82 percent of teens engage in sexting, according to psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein. Learn why by watching the video. 

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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    During the teen years, under the influence of massive new hormonal messages, as well as current needs and experiences, the teenager’s brain is being reshaped, and reconstructed. One part of the teen brain that is undeveloped until the mid-twenties is called the prefrontal cortex (PFC). This part of the brain, when fully developed, is in a constant dialogue with the emotional brain (the limbic brain). In the adult, the PFC and the limbic brain are in balance, each one inhibiting the other. So when an adult has an emotional reaction to being cut off by a speeding car, the PFC part of the brain says “Hey, stop, and think about your desire to go speeding after that car. You might get a ticket, you might cause an accident, your insurance rates will go up.” For the teen, however, the PFC is undeveloped, and the emotional brain (including the amygdala mentioned above) rules the moment, until the PFC is developed in the mid-twenties. The teen thinks: “This is going to be exciting!" if he thinks at all. Auto insurance companies figured this one out long ago.
  • 3 Answers
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    A , Psychology, answered

    There are emotional and legal consequences associated with sexting.

    Emotionally sexting can take a toll on a person, especially if it backfires and gets into the wrong hands. Teens have a unique ability to feel like they're invincible. So, even though they may know that sexting is wrong, they don't think they're going to get caught.

    Also sexting may lead to bullying for the teen whose photos have been solicited to others. This creates a harsh world for a teen to live. Oftentimes they don't reach out for help because of embarrassment and disappointment, fear of making it worse, or fear of getting into trouble. To many teens they may feel like they're caught in a trap with no way out.

    Sexting can compromise reputations. Not just social reputations but digital reputations can take a hit. Once a photo is out, there's no way of knowing how many people have saved it, tagged it, shared it, etc. Unfortunately the photo could re-surface years after it was taken and posted. Plus, more and more college reps and prospective employers are seeking information about candidates and they're doing this online. What they find online could sway their decision about whether or not the person lands the job or gets accepted into the school of his/her dreams.

    Legally

    Once again the law is behind technology. In 2011 - 21 U.S. states passed legislation related to sexting. In 2012, at least 13 states so far are considering bills or resolutions aimed at "sexting".

    Know the sexting laws in your state:
    http://im.about.com/od/sexting/United_States_Sexting_Laws.htm
    www.ncsl.org/issues-research/telecom/sexting-legislation-2012.aspx

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    A , Psychology, answered

    Tips to protect your child from sexting:

    • Explain the legal ramifications of sexting.  Many teens have been jailed, and placed on probation all because of sexting.  Worse yet, they could be charged with the distribution of child pornography if a sexually explicit picture of a minor is being distributed.
    • Discuss how sexting can have an impact on his/her future.  Many college representatives and prospective job employers search online for information on potential candidates.  If they find something that is detrimental or shows poor judgment, it can actually hurt his/her chances of getting into college or securing a job. 
    • Be upfront with your teen about resisting peer pressure.  Teach them to be confident in who they are and not to feel pressured to do something they know is wrong. 
    • Speak with your teen about not responding impulsively to anything on-line or via text. Filtering can help a trigger happy teen from making a permanent, potentially life altering mistake. Encourage your teen to evaluate the consequences of posting their thoughts or pictures before hitting the send button.
    • Speak about online reputations.  Discuss how sexting may have a detrimental impact on what others will think of them.
    • Be honest about sex.  Speak with them about sex, meaningful relationships, STDs and pregnancy.  You would much rather have this talk in preventative mode rather than after something has already happened. 
    • Speak with your teen about being a responsible digital citizen.  Help your teen understand that messages or pictures sent over the Internet or phones are not private or anonymous. 
    • Discuss the need to periodically monitor pictures on the phone, websites visited and social media sites. 
    • Lastly, encourage an open dialogue between you and your teen. Set aside some time each day to just listen and talk with your teen about what's going on in his/her life. 
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