Parenting Teens

Parenting Teens

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    A , Psychology, answered
    Peer pressure is fierce, and teens say those "Just say no" type lines don't work. So help your adolescent create lines to use with peers that let her save face and buck the pressure of drinking and driving: "My dad will take away my license." "I don't need a ride -- my friend is coming." "My mom will ground me for life -- and she always finds out."
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Peer pressure at parties can be fierce, so help your adolescent learn a few peer pressure strategies to use at a party like “How to gracefully lose a drink,” “How to pretend to take a sip,” or the fine art of “How to do a gentle, ‘unintentional’ spill.”
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Dr. Jennifer Hartstein - How can I help my child adjust to high school?

    Got a kid heading off to high school? Even though he's almost grown up, he may need a hand getting used to it. In this video, psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein shares tips for helping a child adjust to high school.

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Psychology, answered
    How hard you should push your teen into challenging AP classes is always a tough call. However, three things help you make the right decision:

    Previous history: Take into account the child’s past grade in subject as well as the teacher or counselor recommendation. Do they feel your child is capable?

    Kid’s view: Listen to the kid’s “why not” factor to help you determine if there is “just cause for not taking the class. Hear him out. There may be another reason besides “It’s too hard.”

    Check your expectations: Ensure your expectations match your child’s actual abilities. Think of a rubber band: the right expectations stretch your child’s potential without snapping his spirit.
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Adolescent Medicine, answered

    Saying goodbye needs to begin approximately 4-6 months prior to them leaving. 

    Be clear as to your own feelings and express them appropriately.

    Carving out a regular weekly/monthly special time with your child will also give you a place to build memories (pictures and videos). Make this a time to focus on the upcoming transition and discuss tools to manage it successfully for all.



     
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    A study released by the American Public Health Association in 2010 suggests that there is an apparent link between excessive messaging, referred to as "hyper-texting" (over 120 text messages a day) and risky behaviors like binge drinking, using drugs, fighting, and promiscuity. The study was conducted at twenty public high schools in the Cleveland area and based on more than 4,200 confidential surveys completed by the high school students of those schools.

    The study also revealed that those teens who "hypertext" are more susceptible to peer pressure and also have permissive or absent parents. "If parents are monitoring their children's texting and social networking, they're probably monitoring other activities as well," said Dr. Scott Frank, the study's lead author. If your child sends over 3,600 text messages a month, I recommend that you take cell phone and social media monitoring seriously to eliminate any potential exposure to risky behaviors.
  • 3 Answers
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    A , Psychology, answered

    There are emotional and legal consequences associated with sexting.

    Emotionally sexting can take a toll on a person, especially if it backfires and gets into the wrong hands. Teens have a unique ability to feel like they're invincible. So, even though they may know that sexting is wrong, they don't think they're going to get caught.

    Also sexting may lead to bullying for the teen whose photos have been solicited to others. This creates a harsh world for a teen to live. Oftentimes they don't reach out for help because of embarrassment and disappointment, fear of making it worse, or fear of getting into trouble. To many teens they may feel like they're caught in a trap with no way out.

    Sexting can compromise reputations. Not just social reputations but digital reputations can take a hit. Once a photo is out, there's no way of knowing how many people have saved it, tagged it, shared it, etc. Unfortunately the photo could re-surface years after it was taken and posted. Plus, more and more college reps and prospective employers are seeking information about candidates and they're doing this online. What they find online could sway their decision about whether or not the person lands the job or gets accepted into the school of his/her dreams.

    Legally

    Once again the law is behind technology. In 2011 - 21 U.S. states passed legislation related to sexting. In 2012, at least 13 states so far are considering bills or resolutions aimed at "sexting".

    Know the sexting laws in your state:
    http://im.about.com/od/sexting/United_States_Sexting_Laws.htm
    www.ncsl.org/issues-research/telecom/sexting-legislation-2012.aspx

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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Thirty-nine percent of teens have admitted to sexting (sending a sexual text message or sexually explicit photo by text message) and 51 percent of teen girls feel pressured to send explicit photos, with the numbers increasing at an alarming rate. "Not my child" is what parents want to believe. But the statistics show there are many teens participating in this racy and growing trend of sexting.
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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    During the teen years, under the influence of massive new hormonal messages, as well as current needs and experiences, the teenager’s brain is being reshaped, and reconstructed. One part of the teen brain that is undeveloped until the mid-twenties is called the prefrontal cortex (PFC). This part of the brain, when fully developed, is in a constant dialogue with the emotional brain (the limbic brain). In the adult, the PFC and the limbic brain are in balance, each one inhibiting the other. So when an adult has an emotional reaction to being cut off by a speeding car, the PFC part of the brain says “Hey, stop, and think about your desire to go speeding after that car. You might get a ticket, you might cause an accident, your insurance rates will go up.” For the teen, however, the PFC is undeveloped, and the emotional brain (including the amygdala mentioned above) rules the moment, until the PFC is developed in the mid-twenties. The teen thinks: “This is going to be exciting!" if he thinks at all. Auto insurance companies figured this one out long ago.
  • 3 Answers
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Dr. Jennifer Hartstein - Why might a teen engage in sexting?

    As many as 82 percent of teens engage in sexting, according to psychologist Dr. Jennifer Hartstein. Learn why by watching the video. 

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