Pain Treatment

Pain Treatment

Pain Treatment
Pain treatment varies depending on the severity of an injury or cause of the pain. Analgesics, or pain relievers, may be your first step. Over-the-counter painkillers like ibuprofen and aspirin can treat mild to moderate pain. Stronger pain medication may be prescribed after surgery or more severe injuries. For chronic pain that persists, your doctor can help determine the best course of treatment or give you a referral for a pain specialist. Learn more about treating pain with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    Would a Pain-Relieving Injection Help My Hip Pain?
    In this video, Steven Warren, MD, specializing in orthopedic surgery at Palms of Pasadena Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida says it's difficult to inject pain medication into the hip, but it can be a good treatment option for certain patients.
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    When back pain is associated with nerve damage the pain can be treated temporarily by an epidural injection or more permanently by surgery. The initial treatment is usually activity as tolerated, anti-inflammatory medication and possibly a muscle relaxant unless certain "red flags" are found, which means more urgent care is needed. These are: fever, bladder or bowel dysfunction, saddle anesthesia (numbness in the body area that would be used to sit on a saddle), and other signs that might indicate cancer.
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    What type of pain medication will children need after orthopedic surgery?
    Children usually need pain medication after orthopedic surgery, but for a shorter period of time compared to adults. Watch orthopedic surgeon Laurel Benson, MD, of Rocky Mountain Pediatric Orthopedics, describe the types of pain meds used for kids.
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you've been prescribed narcotic pain pills and you no longer need them for the pain that you were treated for, dispose of them properly. Don't leave them sitting around. If you do need pain pills, make sure they're in a safe place, so family members don't have access to them. High school kids, and even elementary school kids, may be tempted to try them or take them to school and share them with friends. It's important to know that abuse of narcotic pain killers by teens and kids can be a real problem.
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    day1-west-hills-katz19
    An epidural can go on indefinitely, since the medication can be refilled. In this video, I will explain how an epidural works and how long they're typically needed.
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    A Orthopedic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    How Can Weight Loss Relieve My Hip Pain?
    While weight loss is difficult, it does reduce hip pain, says Fred Redfern, MD, an orthopedic surgeon at Sunrise Hospital. In this video, he describes the effects of weight loss on hip pain.
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    It is possible that serious side effects may occur following a spinal injection procedure. Call your doctor or go to the emergency room if you experience any of the following:
    • Severe pain or headache
    • Fever or chills
    • Loss of bladder or bowel control
    • Progressive weakness
    • Redness or swelling around the injection site
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    If you have had a spinal injection, it takes a few days, even a week or longer, for the steroid medicine to reduce inflammation and pain. Your doctor may want to follow-up with you in 1-3 weeks.
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    You may experience side effects after a spinal injection, which will go away in a few days. These side effects include:
    • Briefly increased pain
    • Headaches
    • Trouble sleeping
    • Facial flushing
    • Hiccups
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    On the day of your spinal injection, you should arrive a little early to fill out any necessary paperwork before the procedure. Have your insurance information with you.
    • For your benefit and safety, current medical information may be requested again.
    • It is important to alert your doctor if you are experiencing any new or recent medical problems. Your doctor may give you a brief physical exam.
    • You may receive an intravenous (IV) line before the procedure.