Pain

Pain

Pain is your body telling you that you have hurt it. This is a good thing, important when you are injured. It can also help diagnose problems with your body. Sometimes pain continues long after it's necessary. Amputees report phantom pain in the legs or arms they no longer have. There are different kinds of pain, and describing the type is useful in diagnosis: recurring, constant, steady, knife-like, radiating, sharp, dull. Medicines that dull pain are analgesics. Those that kill all feeling are anesthetics.

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    A , Fitness, answered

    Third-degree pain comes on in the middle of activity, say two miles into a brisk three-mile walk. At this stage, pain may interfere with activity. There's more "point tenderness" than with first- or second-degree pain, and after a workout, you may see some swelling at the site; this is a sign that some tissue -- muscle, tendon, or bone -- is not coping well with the load you've put on it. 

    Action: Third-degree pain is clearly an indication that it's time to cut back, take some time off, or find an alternative activity; rest and recovery are very important at this point. 

    Apply ice to the point of tenderness to reduce swelling that may increase the discomfort. Elevation and compression also help reduce swelling and stiffness. Think of the mnemonic RICE -- rest, ice, compression, elevation. Once the initial swelling and tenderness have eased, apply heat or gentle massage to speed healing. 

    Stubborn third-degree pain may point to a biomechanical or equipment problem that needs to be corrected before you go further. If you repeatedly feel third-degree pain in your knees during or after walking, for example, it may be time to consult a sports medicine specialist, physical therapist, or other movement specialist who can analyze your gait, shoes, and other factors.

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    A , Fitness, answered

    Fourth-degree pain comes on at the beginning of the workout and doesn't go away; it may also be pain that has lingered from exercise the day before, through the night, and into today's activities. It is sharp and increasingly localized, with holdover swelling and tenderness from the day before, and impedes motion and performance. At this stage, you've moved beyond the normal pain of exertion into the realm of overuse syndrome.

    Action: Rest is imperative. Stop doing whatever causes the pain, but don't quit being active. This is important. You want to stay active, but without causing additional irritation to the tissues that have been injured. If you have pain in your knee from running, for example, perhaps you can swim. If you have pain in a shoulder from tennis, perhaps cycling or brisk walking will be a good substitute. This is called "relative rest;" you're resting what needs to be rested while staying active. 

    While you rest, explore what may be causing the pain and ways of correcting the cause(s). At this point, you may want to get advice from a sports medicine specialist. Apply RICE (rest, ice, compression, and elevation) and analgesics, then heat and a gentle massage. Physical therapy may be appropriate.

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    Acute pain can be caused by a wide variety of conditions, some of which are inherently dangerous. If you bring up your pain with a doctor, they will want as much information as possible to see if they should try to diagnose some other ailment. The first thing they will want to know is the location of the pain. They will want a basic report of severity: how much does it hurt? They will ask about the depth of the pain: deep or surface? The quality: burning or aching? If the pain comes and goes, they will want to know when and how long, and whether or not there is some specific proximate cause.

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    Muscle pain: Symptoms of muscle pain include pain, weakness, paralysis, muscle spasms, and coordination problems.

    Joint pain: Symptoms of joint problems include pain, swelling, stiffness, and/or fever in the joints. In the absence of an injury, pain in one or more of the joints is often caused by inflammation or infection.

    Stiffness is the feeling that the range of motion of a joint or muscle is more limited than normal or difficult to move. Some people with stiffness are capable of moving the joint through its full range of motion, although with difficulty. Joint stiffness usually is worse immediately when arising after lying or sitting still. Joint stiffness is common with arthritis.

    Joint noises, such as creaks and clicks, are common and harmless in many individuals, but they can also occur with specific problems of the joints. For example, the base of the knee cap may creak when it is damaged by osteoarthritis.

    Tendon pain: Symptoms of tendon problems include pain, tenderness, redness, warmth, and/or swelling near the injured tendon. Pain may increase with activity. Symptoms of tendon injury may affect the precise area where the injured tendon is located or may radiate out from the joint area, unlike arthritis pain, which tends to be confined to the joint. Other symptoms include crepitus, or a crunchy sound or feeling when the tendon is used. Crepitus is usually painful. Crepitus may occur in osteoarthritis when the cartilage around joints has eroded away and the joint ends grind against one another, or when the fracture surfaces of two broken bones rub together.

    Pain and stiffness may be worse during the night or when getting up in the morning. Stiffness may occur in the joint near the affected tendon. Movement or mild exercise of the joint usually reduces the stiffness. However, a tendon injury typically gets worse if the affected tendon is not allowed to rest and heal. Too much movement may worsen existing symptoms or bring the pain and stiffness back after improvement.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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    The symptoms of pain are difficult to describe because each person experiences pain differently. However, people with neuropathic pain typically experience a burning or tingling sensation or sensitivity to cold or touch. Nociceptive pain, which is the most common type of pain, gives an achy, sharp, or throbbing sensation. Hospital emergency departments often use a pain chart to help patients quickly identify their level of pain, from no pain at all through worst pain possible.

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    Pain can lead to other conditions, including: fatigue, which may cause impatience and a loss of motivation; sleeplessness, often because pain does not allow the individual to receive a full night's sleep; withdrawal from activity and an increased need to rest; a weakened immune system, leading to frequent infections or illness; depression, which may cause pain to feel worse; other mood changes, such as hopelessness, fear, irritability, anxiety, and stress; loss of mobility, such as such as trouble walking up stairs, standing, or sitting; and disability, which may include not being able to go to work or school or perform other daily activities.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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    Depression: Some individuals with joint, tendon, and muscle problems may suffer from depression. This may happen if the joint, tendon, or muscle disorder interferes significantly with the patient's lifestyle, including causing pain. Individuals should consult their healthcare providers if they experience feelings of sadness, low self-esteem, loss of pleasure, apathy, difficulty functioning, or thoughts of suicide for two weeks or longer with no known underlying cause. These may be signs of depression.

    Joint damage: In some cases, joint disorders can lead to severe joint damage. In such cases, surgery, such as a joint replacement, may be necessary. Individuals should regularly visit their healthcare providers to monitor their conditions.

    Joint deformity: Joint deformities, major changes in the shape of a joint compared to the average shape, are acquired after birth as the result of injury or disease. An example is hand deformities commonly seen with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Decreased mobility: Patients with joint, tendon, and muscle disorders may have decreased mobility in their joints. Joint mobility decreases as the joint becomes more damaged.

    Muscular atrophy: Muscle atrophy refers to a decrease in the size of skeletal muscle, which occurs due to age, lack of use, body wasting (such as in cancer), or diseases such as muscular dystrophy (a genetic, hereditary muscle disease caused by progressive muscle weakness). When a muscle atrophies, it necessarily becomes weaker, since the ability to exert force is related to mass.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A Geriatric Medicine, answered on behalf of
    A study published online in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society evaluated pain severity and distribution in relation to sleep difficulties among 765 people age 64 and older. Pain severity was measured using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) Pain Severity Subscale, and grouped according to no pain, single site, two or more sites, and widespread pain (upper and lower extremities and back pain).

    Three aspects of sleep difficulty were measured using items from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Revised (trouble getting to sleep, sleep more than usual, and restless sleep). Prevalence of trouble getting to sleep according to BPI severity was 17.8%, 19.7%, 32%, and 37%, respectively, for the lowest to highest pain severity quartiles. Sleeping more than usual and restless sleep had similar relationships to BPI severity. Overall, chronic pain was strongly associated with trouble sleeping. If pain is keeping you awake at night, consult your doctor.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Physical pain hurts, but did you know that it’s also one of the biggest triggers for overeating and making poor eating choices? That’s right, when we're in pain (think of anything higher than a 5 on a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being feeling great and 10 being agony), we reach out for foods that will “make us feel better” emotionally (sugar, comfort foods, extra servings). What’s worse is that this actually contributes to more physical pain.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Is there a way to quantify pain?

    There might be a way to quantify physical pain. Watch this video with Robin Miller, MD,  as she discusses the results of a study measuring brain waives and how this information could be used to create better pain treatment.