Overactive Bladder

Overactive Bladder

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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    S030 004 3ReasonsWhyGottaGo
    It's not just bladder size that determines why women have to urinate more than men. In this video, Dr. Oz examines why women have to go the bathroom more often than men.



  • 1 Answer
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    When you suffer from overactive bladder, you tend to experience urges to go during the night. More than one trip to the bathroom disrupts your sleep and can leave you feeling tired and fatigued in the morning and throughout the day.
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    A Urology, answered on behalf of
    The diagnosis of overactive bladder begins with a simple screening question. Do you have bladder problems that are either troublesome, or do you ever leak urine? If the answer is yes, you should ask the doctor to evaluate you and establish a diagnosis.

    To diagnose overactive bladder, your doctor will ask a very detailed history. Your doctor will review your voiding patterns and symptoms using a three-day voiding diary, review your medications, conduct a physical exam and review simple laboratory tests.
     
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Prior to seeing a doctor, your doctor may want you to keep a bladder diary for a few days to help him or her understand your symptoms better. By recording when you go to the bathroom and how often, you can help your doctor determine your bladder capacity and things that may aggravate your symptoms.
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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    A uroflowmetry test may be the first test performed to ensure that you aren’t abnormally retaining urine. Urine retention may be due to a problem with the nerves controlling the bladder and the pelvic floor or due to a bladder obstruction. A flowmeter measures the quantity of fluid voided per unit of times, which should be more than 10 cc per second for women.
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    If you experience signs and symptoms of overactive bladder, you might first visit your family doctor or general practice physician. If the cause of your problems cannot be identified and remedied, your doctor may refer you to a urologist for specialized diagnosis and testing. 
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    During cystometry, bladder pressure is measured while your bladder is being filled up. This allows your doctor to see how much pressure it takes for you to be able to urinate and how fast you do it. Your doctor then uses a catheter to check for uncontrolled muscle contractions and when you might feel an urge to urinate.
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    The prostate gland in men is located where the bladder meets the urethra. As a result, prostate conditions and overactive bladder can be mistaken for each other because the symptoms are similar. Symptoms that may be caused by either of these conditions include:
    • Weak or interrupted urinary stream
    • Sudden urgency to urinate
    • More frequent urination
    • Inability to completely empty the bladder during urination
    • Trouble starting the flow of urine, even when the bladder feels full
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    If you are undergoing treatment for overactive bladder, you should avoid activities that put too much stress or pressure on the bladder. Try to stay away from heavy lifting and strenuous sports. Also, be careful not to injure your spine. Maintain a proper weight and stop smoking. 
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Research has shown that men and women with bladder control problems often experience sexual challenges. Some women may experience pain during intercourse, while some men may experience erectile dysfunction due to stress. Talk to your doctor about any loss of sexual desire or challenges with physical intimacy.