Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
Fish oils, grains and lamb are good sources of Omega 3 fatty acid, a nutrient that has a lot of buzz as being beneficial in the reduction of coronary artery disease. It's also been linked in studies to helping sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. Flaxseed oil is another good source of this acid. Much research is being done on this nutrient, assisted by the fact that the Japanese diet typically has 10 times or more of the nutrient than the American diet. Some studies have also shown a reduction in colon cancer related to Omega 3 fatty acid consumption. Not everyone is able to reap the same benefits from Omega 3's however - one study shows that women with type 1 diabetes do not have a reduction in coronary artery disease with a diet high in this ingredient.

Recently Answered

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    A answered
    Scientific evidence shows that increased dietary omega-3 consumption helps reduce depression. The association between low omega-3 levels and a higher incidence of depression is especially noticeable among women who are pregnant or nursing, which depletes their nutritional reserves.

    Foods high in omega-3s include wild salmon, sardines, tuna, trout, walnuts and hemp and chia seeds. Choose fish that have the lowest levels of mercury and other toxins, especially if you're pregnant.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Omegas, Pt. 2
    If you don't have enough omega-3 fats in your diet, inflammation can occur in your body.

    Watch as Dr. Mark Hyman and Dr. Oz discuss what happens to your arteries when you don't get enough omega-3 fats.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Picture the brain as a tree. The information travels along the trunk (or axon) in order to hook up with another neuron and pass the message along. To move the message faster and avoid wrong connections, the axon has to be protected by a myelin sheath -- think of it like the bark of a tree or the coating of an electrical wire; it keeps the fragile stuff inside protected.

    Myelination—the formation of this protective coating -- starts at about five months of gestation in nerves extending to our organs and extremities from the spinal cord, but much later in the brain.

    Because myelin is made up of about 80 percent fats and 20 percent proteins, healthy fats (such as DHA, which makes up over 97 percent of omega-3 fat in brains) are essential to aiding the myelination process. That importance continues from before birth until 8 years of age, with DHA helping give children higher brain function and increased IQ. This is why all infant formula made in the U.S. has DHA-Omega 3 included as supplement.

    If you are using formula in addition to or instead of breastfeeding, make sure to get the kind with the most DHA. It turns out that most major brands have 32 mg per bottle; check the label and make sure each bottle contains that much.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Omegas, Pt. 3
    How can I tell if I have the right amount of omega 3 and 6 fats? It's very important to have the proper balance of omega-3 and omega-6 fats.

    Watch as Dr. Mark Hyman and Dr. Oz discuss how you can tell if you are getting the right amount of omega-3 and omega-6 fats in this video.



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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    DHA and Food
    Farmed fish may be fed corn and soy, which does not provide them with the algae needed to supply us with docosahexaenoic acid or DHA. Watch the animation to learn more about DHA and fish.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Omega-3 Supplements
    There is some evidence that supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids may lower high levels of triglycerides associated with heart attack. Watch the animation to learn more about omega-3 fatty acids.


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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish such as salmon, sardines, tuna, halibut and herring. Flaxseed, canola oil and walnuts are good sources of Omega-3. In contrast, Omega 6 fat is found in most seeds, vegetable oils, and meats.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    With 85 species and a total biomass of approximately 600 million tons, krill are the largest animal biomass in the world. Krill harvesting in the Antarctic is regulated by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). This organization oversees sustainable krill fishery and has forecasted no shortage of krill.
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    • There is currently a lack of scientific evidence on the use of krill during pregnancy or lactation.
    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    These essential fatty acids support skin health, improve nerve and vascular function, and act as antioxidants. Omega-3 has strong anti-inflammatory properties and may calm skin conditions such as rosacea or eczema and minimize redness. It also boosts immune system functioning. Some nutritional studies have shown that omega-3 may protect against squamous cell skin cancers and decrease sunburn response. Studies have shown that diets rich in the omega-6 fatty acid linoleic acid are associated with less skin dryness and thinning. But it's important to note that these fatty acids must be balanced in the body. For example, too much omega-6 and linoleic acid can cause an inflammatory response in the body, while omega-3 minimizes it. Because of the prevalence of omega-6 in processed snack foods, it's believed that we are getting an abundance of them and not enough omega-3. And studies have shown that too much omega-6 can increase the risk of everything from high blood pressure to dementia and depression. The key is balancing your intake of the two.