Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
Fish oils, grains and lamb are good sources of Omega 3 fatty acid, a nutrient that has a lot of buzz as being beneficial in the reduction of coronary artery disease. It's also been linked in studies to helping sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. Flaxseed oil is another good source of this acid. Much research is being done on this nutrient, assisted by the fact that the Japanese diet typically has 10 times or more of the nutrient than the American diet. Some studies have also shown a reduction in colon cancer related to Omega 3 fatty acid consumption. Not everyone is able to reap the same benefits from Omega 3's however - one study shows that women with type 1 diabetes do not have a reduction in coronary artery disease with a diet high in this ingredient.

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    Scientific evidence shows that increased dietary omega-3 consumption helps reduce depression. The association between low omega-3 levels and a higher incidence of depression is especially noticeable among women who are pregnant or nursing, which depletes their nutritional reserves.

    Foods high in omega-3s include wild salmon, sardines, tuna, trout, walnuts and hemp and chia seeds. Choose fish that have the lowest levels of mercury and other toxins, especially if you're pregnant.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    If your child's not eating fish regularly, you will want to ensure a source of omega 3 fatty acids such as chia seeds, flaxseed oil, walnuts, soybeans/tofu (no, don't skip the fat in soymilk, it's good for you, but do skip the extra sugar), and hempseeds. I also like adding chopped walnuts on top of a waffle with some berries or blending tofu with some honey (in kids over age 1) and cinnamon for a homemade pudding.
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    It depends on what you are taking it for and the source. For example, if you are taking it to reduce the risk of heart disease you need to consume two 3-oz. servings of cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel, halibut, sardines, tuna, and herring each week or take 3 g of fish oil per day. Remember to consult your healthcare provider before you start taking omega-3 because it may interfere with other medications.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Krill are small, shrimp-like crustaceans with 85 species and a total biomass of approximately 600 million tons, making them the largest animal biomass in the world. Not only are krill the primary diet for numerous fish and marine mammals, they are also a sustainable, environmentally friendly source of omega-3 fatty acids. Krill oil is rich in the omega-3 oils EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), as well as phospholipids, and the super anti-oxidant carotenoid called astaxanthin.




     
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    No, in fact that’s generally why people take an omega-3 supplement -- because they aren’t eating fish. Also keep in mind that not all omega-3 fatty acids (FA) have equal health benefits. The two most studied omega-3 fatty acids are the 20-carbon eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and the 22-carbon docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These are the primary compounds in fish oils that scientist attribute to the health benefits of fish consumption. Therefore if you are looking for the specific benefits, such as maintaining heart, brain, hearing and vision health, attributed to omega-3s, look for fish oil capsules containing ~600mgs of omega -3s made up of 360mgs EPA & 240mgs DHA. Take 1 capsule daily if not consuming 2-4 servings per week of fatty fish unless a qualified physician advises more for a specific condition.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    There's ever more evidence that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) omega-3 fatty acids do great things for your gray and white matter. The key is DHA, the active component of omega-3. Missing out on these good fats -- also found in salmon, trout, and the fish-free algal oil capsules I prefer -- shrinks your brain and boosts dementia risk. Not getting enough also messes up your ability to remember, for example, where you parked the car or put your keys. DHA omega-3 fatty acids protect your brain from damage after a stroke, too.

    DHA omega-3 fatty acids help protect your vision. They also slash your risk for low vision and blindness. These good fats help by cooling inflammation, slowing the overgrowth of blood vessels in the eyes, and keeping your retinas -- the "movie screens" in your eyes -- free of damage.
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Chia is a plant from Mexico and Guatemala. The seed has a surprising amount of fiber (4.5 grams in a tablespoon), promoting an excellent alternative to satiate hunger. According to a study published in the Journal of the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism -- adding two tablespoons of chia at breakfast helps promote fullness until lunch time. Chia also contains protein (2.2 grams in a tablespoon -- which is almost double the protein of quinoa), and the antioxidant omega 3 (which is triple the omega 3 of salmon).

    Omega-3 transforms chia into a special food that can combat inflammation in the cells, leaving the body less resistant to weight loss. Chia also helps balance insulin levels. The recommendation? Two tablespoons per day: one at breakfast and another one throughout the day.
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    According to a recent American Heart Association clinical trial, prescription omega-3 fatty acids have no significant benefit on treating atrial fibrillation. Study participants taking prescription omega-3 fatty acids had similar symptoms and results as volunteers given a placebo or sugar pill. While eating fish high in omega-3 fatty acids has been shown to reduce the risk of sudden death from heart disease, taking a prescription omega-3 does not appear to prevent or reduce atrial fibrillation symptoms. Researchers concluded that the benefits of taking a prescription omega-3 do not justify the expense of the medication.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Omegas, Pt. 2
    If you don't have enough omega-3 fats in your diet, inflammation can occur in your body.

    Watch as Dr. Mark Hyman and Dr. Oz discuss what happens to your arteries when you don't get enough omega-3 fats.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    DHA and Food
    Because of fish farming, only wild salmon and trout now consistently supply docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA. Watch the animation to learn more about dietary DHA.