Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
Fish oils, grains and lamb are good sources of Omega 3 fatty acid, a nutrient that has a lot of buzz as being beneficial in the reduction of coronary artery disease. It's also been linked in studies to helping sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. Flaxseed oil is another good source of this acid. Much research is being done on this nutrient, assisted by the fact that the Japanese diet typically has 10 times or more of the nutrient than the American diet. Some studies have also shown a reduction in colon cancer related to Omega 3 fatty acid consumption. Not everyone is able to reap the same benefits from Omega 3's however - one study shows that women with type 1 diabetes do not have a reduction in coronary artery disease with a diet high in this ingredient.

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    Scientific evidence shows that increased dietary omega-3 consumption helps reduce depression. The association between low omega-3 levels and a higher incidence of depression is especially noticeable among women who are pregnant or nursing, which depletes their nutritional reserves.

    Foods high in omega-3s include wild salmon, sardines, tuna, trout, walnuts and hemp and chia seeds. Choose fish that have the lowest levels of mercury and other toxins, especially if you're pregnant.
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    Omega 3 seems to have few interactions, and appears to be well tolerated at most times of the day. Docusate (colace) should not be taken with mineral oil or aspirin, and may be more effective for you if taken at a specific time of the day -- depending upon your personal preferences.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    DHA and Food
    The omega-3 fatty acid known as docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, has many important functions and needs to be obtained from your diet or supplements. Watch the animation to learn more about sources of DHA.


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    Salmon has two types of omega-3 fatty acids -- docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) -- both of which may be important in preventing or slowing down eye diseases. A lack of omega-3s may also contribute to dry eye syndrome. Other omega-3 sources include tuna, sardines, walnuts, and flaxseeds.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Will Omega-3 Supplements Improve My Mood?
    Supplements can help with a wide range of health issues including improving your mood. Watch Dr. Oz explain how omega-3 supplements can help your body deal with stress. Plus, learn the best way to take vitamin D!
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Both omega-3 and omega-6 are responsible for creating the prostaglandins that downregulate inflammation. But, the omega-6s we are eating are mostly highly industrialized and over-processed oils such as corn, soybean, sunflower, safflower, and cottonseed. "Highly industrialized" means damaged, which means it is inflammatory to the body, not anti-inflammatory. These are not the omega-6 oils that produce prostaglandins directly, such as borage, evening primrose, and black currant seed. The omega-6 oils we're eating are linoleic acid (LA), which needs to be conjugated into gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) in order to create the prostaglandins. This is a process that requires many cofactors, including the presence of magnesium and zinc, two very common nutritional deficiencies. The process is also inhibited by excess insulin and the consumption of trans-fatty acids, aspirin, alcohol, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (like ibuprofen), all extremely common. Furthermore, the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 in our diet is skewed. Historically, the ratio was one to one. In the standard American diet, the ratio is now anywhere from one to fifteen to one to thirty.

    What this means is that we have significantly increased our body's ability to inflame but decreased our body's ability to anti-inflame. This is a big deal because inflammation is a significant health challenge and associated with many of the most common and chronic diseases we're currently seeing: heart disease (inflammation of the arteries), cancer, obesity, diabetes, Alzheimer's, and any of the many conditions ending in "-itis" (arthritis, colitis, bronchitis, and so on).

    To rectify this balance, we need to increase our consumption of high-quality omega-3s and reduce our consumption of omega-6s. We need to balance the rest of our diets to ensure that our insulin levels are appropriate, that we have sufficient nutritional cofactors, and that we reduce inhibiting factors so that omega-6s can become the anti-inflammatory prostaglandins we so badly need.
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    Wild caught salmon is rich in a type of fat known as omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fats are a type of unsaturated fat thought to benefit heart health, among other things. Research has also linked increases in dietary omega-3 fats to a lower risk of dementia and improved brain functioning.

    Omega-3 fatty acids are not only found in salmon. Other good sources of omega-3 fatty acids include flax seeds, walnuts, beef, sardines and other fatty fish. Aim for 4 ounces (oz) of fatty fish like salmon two to three times a week.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    DHA and Food
    Good sources of docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA include wild salmon and trout, DHA-fortified foods, and DHA supplements. Watch the animation to learn more about sources of DHA.


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    A , Psychology, answered
    The three types of omega-3 fatty acids are alpha-linolenic acid (LNA) (derived from seed and nut oils, principally from flaxseed oil), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (from fish oil), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (also from fish oil). Most studies have demonstrated that EPA is the most effective type of omega-3 fatty acid in treating mood disorders. LNA has difficulty getting into the brain (the brain is protected by what is known as the blood-brain barrier, and LNA cannot cross the blood-brain barrier). Thus, for use to treat mood disorders, one must get omega-3 from fish oil. The dosage that has been shown to have some impact on mood is 500 to 1000 mg twice a day.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    While fish is low in heart-unhealthy saturated fat, it provides another healthy quality that makes it a ringer for your heart. The omega-3 fatty acids in fish can help slow the plaque buildup in your arteries that contribute to heart disease as well as reduce your risk of dying from heart disease.

    It is currently recommended that you eat two fish meals, especially omega 3-rich fatty fish, weekly. Salmon, sardines, and tuna are all good sources of omega 3. 
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