Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
Fish oils, grains and lamb are good sources of Omega 3 fatty acid, a nutrient that has a lot of buzz as being beneficial in the reduction of coronary artery disease. It's also been linked in studies to helping sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. Flaxseed oil is another good source of this acid. Much research is being done on this nutrient, assisted by the fact that the Japanese diet typically has 10 times or more of the nutrient than the American diet. Some studies have also shown a reduction in colon cancer related to Omega 3 fatty acid consumption. Not everyone is able to reap the same benefits from Omega 3's however - one study shows that women with type 1 diabetes do not have a reduction in coronary artery disease with a diet high in this ingredient.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Yes! Krill oil is rich in the omega-3 oils EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), as well as phospholipids, and the super anti-oxidant carotenoid called astaxanthin. One study showed krill oil may be 48 times more potent than fish oil. This means you may need far less of it than fish oil, as confirmed by a 2011 study published in the journal Lipids
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    A answered
    Studies show that omega-3 supplements may decrease the risk of depression, including premenstrual and postpartum depression. Taking omega-3s could also avoid increasing antidepressant dosages for some people. In studies of people who were not responding well to antidepressants, adding omega-3s in addition to the antidepressants led to an improvement in mood. It is unclear whether omega-3 fatty acids would be effective on their own, not in combination with medication.

    Other studies have found that people with depression often have low levels of omega-3s, and that depressive disorders occur less often in populations that consume high quantities of omega-3-rich fish. 
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Because they are at the base of the food chain, krill do not accumulate as many potentially harmful toxins and heavy metals as other marine life higher in the food chain. Krill feed primarily on plankton—microscopic algae made up of tiny plants (phytoplankton) and animals (zooplankton)—which, is the first link in the food chain. Phytoplankton is rich in EPA and DHA, and also amino acids, B vitamins, vitamin A, and a host of minerals, including zinc, magnesium, and calcium. The species of krill used for dietary supplements is called Euphausia superba, which are typically harvested from uncontaminated deep sea waters of the Antarctic Ocean.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    With 85 species and a total biomass of approximately 600 million tons, krill are the largest animal biomass in the world. Krill harvesting in the Antarctic is regulated by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). This organization oversees sustainable krill fishery and has forecasted no shortage of krill.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    Omega-3 dietary supplements containing fish oils are heavily promoted for heart health, among other things. Extensive claims suggest they can help lower cholesterol levels that put people at greater risk for heart disease. Yet, there is no clinical data supporting these claims. Studies are currently being done to determine whether omega-3 prescription products can lower your risk for cardiovascular events and death.

    That said, you should never substitute over-the-counter dietary supplements like fish oil in place of a doctor’s advice or properly prescribed heart medications. There are issues and concerns regarding the content, quality and purity of omega-3 fatty acids sold over-the-counter as dietary supplements. It is important to recognize such supplements do not always contain what the labels states -- and levels of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) may vary from batch to batch. Omega-3 fish oil supplements are not regulated by the FDA.

    There are several FDA-approved prescription omega-3 fatty acid products available to treat lipid problems, such as high triglycerides, which may have an impact on heart disease.

    Fish oils in omega-3 dietary supplements contain lower levels of EPA and DHA than the prescription products and are not approved or intended to treat disease.

    You can get omega-3 fatty acids through your diet. Things like cold-water fish and seafood, for example, have high levels of omega-3 fats.
     
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Krill oil is derived from krill, which are small, shrimp-like crustaceans that are typically harvested from uncontaminated deep sea waters of the Antarctic Ocean. Krill oil is rich in the omega-3 oils EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), as well as phospholipids, and the super anti-oxidant carotenoid called astaxanthin.
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    A answered
    To reduce depression, studies suggest that you can take one to three grams of fish oil per day, with very few risks. Although some studies used much higher doses of omega-3s, those amounts didn't bring better results. With nutritional supplements, there is an optimal dose that the body and brain need for desired function. Providing more than that may not increase benefit.
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    A Internal Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Patients with type 2 diabetes most often have elevated "bad fats" known as triglycerides and have lower amounts of the "good cholesterol" known as HDL. This combination of high triglycerides and low HDL in diabetic patients significantly increases their risk of heart disease and stroke. Omega 3 fatty acids are very beneficial in lowering the triglycerides and elevating the good cholesterol and in so doing decreases the risk of heart disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. There is also some evidence that omega 3 decreases inflammation in the body which is beneficial to diabetic patients who most often have "angry" cholesterol plaques which can rupture and cause heart attacks, strokes and other vascular complications. A steady diet of these omega 3 fatty acids can not only have a protective effect on the body's arterial system but also can reduce the viscosity or "thickened blood flow" often seen in these patients.

    At least 1-2 weekly servings of a non-fried, omega-3 containing fish (like wild-caught Pacific salmon) is enough to boost your blood levels of omega-3 and afford these benefits listed above. Other excellent souces of Omega 3's are walnuts and  flax seeds
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    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered

    Having a diet rich with omega 3's can help prevent postpartum depression. Many pregnant women take a prenatal vitamin that has DHA in it. It is important to get at least 250 mg every day especially in the last 3 months when the baby’s brain is developing. Unfortunately some insurance companies don't cover the vitamins with the DHA and when money is tight some women will switch to an over the counter vitamin which may not contain the recommended daily intake of an omega 3 essential fatty acid. Omega 3 can be found in over the counter fish oil supplements, oily fish, dark green vegetables and flaxseed oil. Talk to your midwife or ob/gyn if you are concerned about experiencing postpartum depression and come up with a diet and supplements and build in family support that may help you over the hump. Some fish may contain mercury to discuss your seafood intake with your health care provider as well. Remember there is always medicine if the holistic approach isn't working for you.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Omega-3 fatty acids -- found in fish oils -- seem to increase the number of PPARs (do-good substances that have an anti-inflammatory effect). I recommend you get Omega-3s in the form of three 4-ounce servings of fish per week or a 2-gram fish oil capsule a day or an ounce of walnuts a day. (Saturated fats, by the way, increase inflammatory properties, and trans fats undermine the effects of Omega-3s.)
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