Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
Fish oils, grains and lamb are good sources of Omega 3 fatty acid, a nutrient that has a lot of buzz as being beneficial in the reduction of coronary artery disease. It's also been linked in studies to helping sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. Flaxseed oil is another good source of this acid. Much research is being done on this nutrient, assisted by the fact that the Japanese diet typically has 10 times or more of the nutrient than the American diet. Some studies have also shown a reduction in colon cancer related to Omega 3 fatty acid consumption. Not everyone is able to reap the same benefits from Omega 3's however - one study shows that women with type 1 diabetes do not have a reduction in coronary artery disease with a diet high in this ingredient.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Because they are at the base of the food chain, krill do not accumulate as many potentially harmful toxins and heavy metals as other marine life higher in the food chain. Krill feed primarily on plankton—microscopic algae made up of tiny plants (phytoplankton) and animals (zooplankton)—which, is the first link in the food chain. Phytoplankton is rich in EPA and DHA, and also amino acids, B vitamins, vitamin A, and a host of minerals, including zinc, magnesium, and calcium. The species of krill used for dietary supplements is called Euphausia superba, which are typically harvested from uncontaminated deep sea waters of the Antarctic Ocean.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    With 85 species and a total biomass of approximately 600 million tons, krill are the largest animal biomass in the world. Krill harvesting in the Antarctic is regulated by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). This organization oversees sustainable krill fishery and has forecasted no shortage of krill.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Yes! Krill oil is rich in the omega-3 oils EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), as well as phospholipids, and the super anti-oxidant carotenoid called astaxanthin. One study showed krill oil may be 48 times more potent than fish oil. This means you may need far less of it than fish oil, as confirmed by a 2011 study published in the journal Lipids
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    I believe that no other vitamin or mineral in the entire nutraceutical business is as good for human health as krill oil. One study showed krill oil may be 48 times more potent than fish oil!
     
    While fish oil can be a good source of omega-3s, there are problems with it. For example, fish oil can spoil quickly due to oxidation, it has low absorption rates and quality control concerns that vary from vendor to vendor. The EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) in krill oil are incorporated into phospholipid molecules which make the omega-3s highly absorbable and bioavailable.
     
    The phospholipid form in krill oil is both fat-soluble and water-soluble, while
    the DHA and EPA in fish oil are bonded to triglycerides, which is fat-soluble only. This difference has broad implications for absorption. Additionally, taking krill oil typically does not result in fishy burps and aftertaste related to digestion reflux.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Krill oil is derived from krill, which are small, shrimp-like crustaceans that are typically harvested from uncontaminated deep sea waters of the Antarctic Ocean. Krill oil is rich in the omega-3 oils EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), as well as phospholipids, and the super anti-oxidant carotenoid called astaxanthin.
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    A answered
    Vegans who do not want to consume fish oil might get some benefit from alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the omega-3 found in flaxseed oil. ALA is somewhat different from EPA and DHA, the omega-3s in fish oil, and has not been studied for use in depression.

    Food sources of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) include seafood and omega-3 enriched eggs. In addition to flax oil, ALA is found in canola oil and walnuts.
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    To reduce depression, studies suggest that you can take one to three grams of fish oil per day, with very few risks. Although some studies used much higher doses of omega-3s, those amounts didn't bring better results. With nutritional supplements, there is an optimal dose that the body and brain need for desired function. Providing more than that may not increase benefit.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Will Omega-3 Supplements Improve My Mood?
    Supplements can help with a wide range of health issues including improving your mood. Watch Dr. Oz explain how omega-3 supplements can help your body deal with stress. Plus, learn the best way to take vitamin D!
    See All 2 Answers
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    • DHA may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use ofGinkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
    • DHA may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
    • DHA may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking herbs or supplements that lower blood pressure.
    • DHA may also interact with alpha-linolenic acid, anticancer herbs and supplements, anti-inflammatories, antiseizure herbs and supplements, arachidonic acid, carnitine, cholesterol-lowering herbs and supplements, cod liver oil, conjugated linolenic acid, copper, echium oil, EPA, essential fatty acids, evening primrose oil, folate, gamma-linolenic acid, herbs and supplements that may affect the immune system, herbs and supplements that may promote heart health, herbs and supplements that may widen blood vessels, hormonal agents, iron, lutein, mood stabilizers, myristic acid, seal oil, stearidonic acid, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc.
    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/