Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
Fish oils, grains and lamb are good sources of Omega 3 fatty acid, a nutrient that has a lot of buzz as being beneficial in the reduction of coronary artery disease. It's also been linked in studies to helping sufferers of rheumatoid arthritis. Flaxseed oil is another good source of this acid. Much research is being done on this nutrient, assisted by the fact that the Japanese diet typically has 10 times or more of the nutrient than the American diet. Some studies have also shown a reduction in colon cancer related to Omega 3 fatty acid consumption. Not everyone is able to reap the same benefits from Omega 3's however - one study shows that women with type 1 diabetes do not have a reduction in coronary artery disease with a diet high in this ingredient.

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    Scientific evidence shows that increased dietary omega-3 consumption helps reduce depression. The association between low omega-3 levels and a higher incidence of depression is especially noticeable among women who are pregnant or nursing, which depletes their nutritional reserves.

    Foods high in omega-3s include wild salmon, sardines, tuna, trout, walnuts and hemp and chia seeds. Choose fish that have the lowest levels of mercury and other toxins, especially if you're pregnant.
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    A , Ophthalmology, answered
    Omega 3 fatty acids can be helpful for dry eyes and are recommended often. Many patients are also using artifical tears, gels or ointments. Anti-inflammatories such as Restasis are another treatment used commonly. Punctal plugs, room humidifiers even contact lenses have been used. Because there are so many choices, please see your eye doctor to be best evaluated for this very common eye problem.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Because they are at the base of the food chain, krill do not accumulate as many potentially harmful toxins and heavy metals as other marine life higher in the food chain. Krill feed primarily on plankton—microscopic algae made up of tiny plants (phytoplankton) and animals (zooplankton)—which, is the first link in the food chain. Phytoplankton is rich in EPA and DHA, and also amino acids, B vitamins, vitamin A, and a host of minerals, including zinc, magnesium, and calcium. The species of krill used for dietary supplements is called Euphausia superba, which are typically harvested from uncontaminated deep sea waters of the Antarctic Ocean.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Yes, since there are certain medications that omega-3 fatty acids can interact with, you should tell your doctor. In addition, certain medical conditions may warrant higher than normal dosages of omega-3 fatty acids, so your doctor will need to be made aware if you are already taking supplements. High doses may also make someone more prone to bleeding, which would be vital information to supply your doctor should you require any surgery.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    You should take 600 mg of DHA Omega-3 supplements daily. Look for DHA content. You may have to take more than one pill. And get another 300 mg of DHA from salmon, trout or sardines -- one 4-ounce portion a week will work. Keep your fish oil in the fridge to make it last longer. You should take your supplement with breakfast.
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    It depends on your allergies, meaning you would discuss with your allergy care doctor first. It would be unusual to have an allergic reaction to omega-3 oils themselves but not to the foods that contain them. Known contraindications or adverse events related to ingestion of omega-3 oils are very few. But allergies to certain marine life that contain omega-3s exists (e.g. fish/shellfish) and allergies to the plant foods including nuts that contain the oil are common. So it may be the foods that contain the omega-3s you need to worry about and not the oil itself but because the oil is extracted from these sources there may residue that cause an allergic flare up if you consume them (if you have an allergy to the source). If you have a fish allergy, you may be able to use a vegetarian omega-3 supplement and if you have a plant allergy, use a fish oil supplement. If you are cleared to use one or the other, look for capsules containing 600mgs of omega -3s made up of 360mgs EPA & 240mgs DHA. For the potential health benefits related to maintaining brain, heart, hearing and eye health, take 1 capsule daily if not consuming 2-4 servings per week of fatty fish.
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    A , Ophthalmology, answered
    One study found that women who ate plenty of omega-3 fats (a healthy fat found in tuna, salmon, and other fatty fish, as well as in flaxseed) were less likely to develop dry eye syndrome (a decline in tear production) than women who rarely ate such fats. Tuna in particular seemed to be the most beneficial.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Omega-3 fatty acids, which are abundant in certain fatty fish, have a range of biologic effects that would lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Data from the Physicians' Health Study showed that people who ate fish once a week were half as likely to die suddenly from a heart attack compared with those who ate fish less than once a month. One year later, a report in The Lancet described a randomized controlled trial in which men who had suffered a heart attack received either a fish oil supplement, 300 mg of vitamin E, both, or neither. Those who received the fish oil supplement had significantly lower rates of heart attack, stroke, or death during the next three and a half years. Sudden death rates dropped by 45%.

    Additional support for fish oils comes from a report on nearly 80,000 women in the Nurses' Health Study. This 14-year study found that women who ate fish at least twice a week were half as likely to suffer strokes caused by clots blocking an artery to the brain compared with those who ate fish less than once a month. The study also found that eating one to three servings of fish per month cut the risk of heart disease by 20%.

    People who use cholesterol-lowering statin drugs might further reduce their risk of heart problems by getting more omega-3s from fish or pills, according to a large randomized controlled study published in The Lancet. Around 19,000 people with elevated cholesterol levels took a statin alone or with an omega-3 fatty acid supplement. After four and a half years, the people who took the combination had 19% fewer coronary events, such as angina and fatal or nonfatal heart attack, than those who took the statin alone.

    Overall, the evidence from these and many other studies indicates that modest consumption of fish, such as 1-2 servings of oily (fatty) fish per week, reduces the risk of dying from coronary heart disease.  The risk of stroke is also lower in observational studies, but this has not yet been confirmed in any randomized trials.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    There are three main varieties of omega-3 PUFAs that can be found in food sources or as oral supplements.
    ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) is mainly found in plant foods such as nuts and seeds like walnuts and flaxseed, vegetable oils like canola and flaxseed, and some leafy green vegetables like kale, spinach and salad greens (in small amounts). EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) are mainly found in fish and organ meat.

    The American Heart Association recommends eating one serving of fish at least twice a week, particularly fatty fish like salmon, sardines, mackerel, herring, or albacore tuna, since these are rich in DHA and EPA. One serving is about 3.5 ounces or the size of the palm of your hand.

    There are risks and benefits to taking any oral supplements. As noted by the 2010, Dietary Guidelines for Americans, nutrient needs should be met primarily from food sources. In some cases, fortified foods or dietary supplements may be useful to meet a nutrient need that is consumed in inadequate amounts.

    Dietary supplements should not take the place of a well-balanced diet. Make sure to ask your physician or health care provider before taking a fish oil supplement.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Two special polyunsaturated fats, omega-3 and omega-6, are considered especially heart healthy because they not only lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL but also stabilize the heart's rhythm, thin blood, and decrease inflammation. Omega-6 is plentiful in our food supply, but omega-3 is more limited. You can get omega-3 in fatty fish (such as salmon), walnuts, canola oil, soybean products, ground flaxseed, and flaxseed oil.