Male Reproductive System

Male Reproductive System

Male Reproductive System
A healthy sex life is a very important part of life for most men. Men's reproductive health is dependent on the health and proper functioning of the external genitals, internal sex organs, sperm, semen, and male sex hormones. Men's sexual health also includes fertility. You may assume that women are mostly responsible for infertility, but men's health issues account for half of all infertility cases. Protect your sexual health and fertility by living a healthy lifestyle and avoiding risky behaviors. If you notice pain in your groin area, have problems maintaining or getting an erection, or have problems with ejaculation, you may need to talk to your doctor.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    When a man ejaculates, the sperm-carrying semen fires out through the urethra in a seek-and-conquer mission. It may seem that all these millions of sperm are racing each other to the finish, but the sperm have different roles. Some are deemed the leaders of the pack, trying to be the first to cross the line. Others are designed to assist, specifically by blocking other men's sperm from making it to the finish line. The goal of pregnancy, of course, is for a sperm to find an egg during a precise window of opportunity and fertilize it.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    From a broad perspective, the penis is a man's dipstick; it tells you how everything is functioning throughout the rest of your body.

    If the solider stands at attention when called to do so, it indicates that you have good blood flow in other places. But if he decides to take a little R&R, it means that a man's arterial health is not as youthful as it needs to be.

    That's because the chemical mechanisms that work to get blood in and out of the penis are the same ones that help blood flow to and from the brain, heart, and kidneys. No matter the location of veins and arteries in your body, it's the same blood-flow process.
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    The testes, aka balls, aka beans, live in the scrotum, aka ball sack. These are the organs of reproduction in the male that produce sperm.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    While shaving rituals are as much cultural as they are physical, a man should look at his shaving habits-and specifically, how quickly his stubble regrows after shaving--as one possible indicator of low testosterone.

    If a man notices that he used to shave once a day, but now has to shave less often, it's a sign that testosterone is not helping stimulate a great deal of beard growth, which is a sign of low testosterone or a testosterone deficiency. Not having to shave daily may be convenient, but health-wise, it's a better sign if you need to hit that razor every 24 hours to keep stubble at bay.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The source of sperm and testosterone - the testes - are filled with tubules that look like cooked spaghetti. If these seminiferous tubules from each testicle were stretched out, they'd create a string three feet long (please don't try this yourself). At age 50, tubules begin to narrow due to thickening of connective tissue within tubules, and sperm production decreases, but sperm never lose viability (the oldest father on record was 94).

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    These tips will help a man keep his swimmers healthy and strong:

    DO:
    1. Eat your fruits and veggies, grains, beans, soy, nuts, oats, foods with flavanols (like broccoli, radishes, onions, tomatoes, and leeks), as well as other foods high in polyphenols (think bright colored fruits and veggies), vitamins C and E, zinc, selenium, and omega-3s (fatty fish, soy products, whole grains, nuts, and flaxseeds)
    2. Wear boxers, not briefs. For optimum fertility, sperm prefer a temperature slightly lower than the rest of your body.
    3. Avoid exposure to organic solvents, heavy metals, synthetic polymers, pesticides, PCBs, and ionizing radiation
    4. Keep well hydrated while working out
    5. Get a physical and discuss your personal and family medical history, including birth defects, sexually transmitted diseases, difficulty or pain with erection, ejaculation, or urination, and any medications you may be taking that could affect your fertility (antihypertensives, diuretics, antidepressants, antiseizure medication, antihistamines, antibiotics, chemotherapy, immunosuppressive drugs).

    DON'T:
    1. Smoke
    2. Drink excessively (more than 2 alcoholic drinks a day)
    3. Use recreational drugs
    4. Take steroids
    5. Eat fatty cuts of beef, dark-meat turkey, or fish containing mercury
    6. Use oil-based paints, spray paints, or paint thinners
    7. Keep your laptop on your lap
    8. Lounge in the hot tub, steam room, or sauna (it can raise the temperature of sperm and kill them)
    9. Spend a lot of time wearing an athletic cup or jock strap
    10. Cycle if you experience numbness or tingling in the genital area or sexual dysfunction
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Unlike women, men don't have a preset number of their reproductive players. In fact, a man produces more sperm in each ejaculation than the total number of eggs that a woman is endowed with for life.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    A man's sperm, which is carried in semen that's made by glands such as the prostate, is stored in a duct called the vas deferens.
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    If you have symptoms that could be caused by chronic bacterial prostatitis, you should talk to your doctor. These symptoms may include painful urination, bloody urine, getting urinary tract infections often, and general pelvic pain. It's especially important to talk to a doctor if you are in a high-risk group, including men with a history of prostatitis, urinary tract infection, or pelvic trauma, such as injury from bicycling or horseback riding. Other risk factors include dehydration, catheterization, and unprotected sexual intercourse. Even if symptoms seem to disappear for long periods of time, it is important to see a physician, because the symptoms are likely to return. The sooner you see a doctor, the sooner you can start improving your quality of life.

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    Because chronic bacterial prostatitis is caused by bacterial infection from a common strain, it may be prevented with behavior modification. Avoiding anal sex without protection will greatly reduce your risk of infection. Also, avoiding alcohol consumption in excess and dehydration should help you avoid prostatitis. Sometimes, an injury to lower regions of the body, like the area between the scrotum and anus, will lead to chronic bacterial prostatitis. Certain activities, such as bicycling and horseback riding, can lead to such an injury, so taking extra precautions during these activities will help avoid infection in the long-term.