Macular Degeneration

Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration is an eye disease that comes with aging. The center of your eye - the macular - slowly deteriorates, which blurs vision and causes blind spots. There are treatments for macular degeneration - but it's also possible to help prevent it with good sunglasses.

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    A answered
    The macula is a small part of the eye, in the center of the retina. It helps the retina sense light and provide sharp, central vision. If the macula becomes damaged, central vision may become blurry.

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can affect one or both eyes. It can cause gradual damage to the macula, and lead to slow vision changes. Or it can progress more quickly, making vision changes more noticeable. Blurry vision due to AMD can get in the way of daily life and activities, but it does not usually lead to complete vision loss. See your eye doctor regularly to detect AMD early. 
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    A Radiation Oncology, answered on behalf of
    Treatment for wet macular degeneration involves injecting medicine into the white of the affected eye using a very small needle. The most serious complication following an injection is an infection inside the eye, but the risk of this occurring is very low, about 0.1%. During the week following an injection, if you experience worsening vision, pain, redness, or pus-like drainage from the eye, you may have an infection, which requires immediate treatment. Call your ophthalmologist immediately.
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    A Radiation Oncology, answered on behalf of
    The main goal of treatment is to stabilize your vision and prevent it from getting much worse. After treatment, which involves injecting medicine into the affected eye, most patients don’t experience a significant improvement in vision, although some do. A realistic post-treatment outcome is that your vision will remain stable rather than become clearer.
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    A Radiation Oncology, answered on behalf of
    Wet macular degeneration can affect one or both eyes. Standard treatment is to inject medicine into the affected eye with a very small needle (about the width of a hair) through the white of the eye. Your eye will be numbed before the injection. At most, you should feel just a small pinch or sensation of pressure. Repeated injections, sometimes as often as once per month, are usually required.
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    A Ophthalmology, answered on behalf of
    Treating age-related macular degeneration may be helpful for people who are legally blind, but it depends on their particular circumstances. Often, a person who is considered legally blind is still able to perform tasks like read large-print books and safely move about.

    Your physician can help determine if macular degeneration treatment is appropriate for your situation. The decision typically rests on how much useful central vision you still have, what your needs and goals are, how your eyes have responded to treatment in the past, and whether there are potential risks involved with treatment.

    Keep in mind that macular degeneration only affects your central vision. Whereas eye conditions such as glaucoma and cataracts affect peripheral vision. While treating those conditions may prove beneficial, they won’t repair central-vision damage caused by macular degeneration.
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    Light therapy in combination with other treatments may benefit people who experience complications from eye diseases like macular degeneration (loss of vision due to retina damage). Light therapy may help reduce risk of vision loss, but the effectiveness of light therapy alone is not clear at this time.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    If you have early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), doctors recommend frequently grazing at the salad bar to protect your sight. AMD is a leading cause of blindness but good nutrition can help hold it off. Make a beeline for the carrots, spinach and other dark leafy greens. You want their lutein, zeaxanthin and betacarotene; all fight AMD. Omega-3 fatty acids are also vision savers. Find them in wild or canned salmon, trout, canned tuna, some nuts (particularly walnuts) and supplements. We recommend 900 mg a day of algae-based omega-3s in their DHA form (the form your body likes best).

    There’s good evidence that taking specific amounts of vitamins C, E and A (or beta carotene), as well as copper and zinc, can help prevent intermediate AMD in one or both eyes -- or advanced AMD in one eye -- from worsening. This powerful combo is called the AREDS formula (for Age-Related Eye Disease Study). Just “don’t try this at home.” Talk to your ophthalmologist about it. By the way, there’s no evidence that AREDS helps early AMD. Only lutein (10 mg twice a day) and those omega-3s (900 mg a day) do that.
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    Emerging research suggests that getting eye-supporting nutrients in combination -- in the context of a low-glycemic-index diet -- may have a profound effect on slowing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). So do your eyes a favor: Don't focus on a single nutrient. Instead, eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, choose healthy fats and high-fiber carbs, and reduce your intake of red meat, sugars, and refined flours.

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    A recent study suggests that a low-glycemic-index (GI) diet may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by almost 8%. One way to quickly lower the GI of a meal? Use high-fiber whole grains instead of refined carbs. Think quinoa, brown rice, whole oats, and whole-wheat breads and pasta rather than products made from refined grains or refined, enriched flour.

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    Macular degeneration can have complications. Legal blindness can result from advanced macular degeneration, and wet macular degeneration can lead to a detached or scarred retina. This retinal detachment is called subretinal neovascularization and it affects about 20 percent of people who have macular degeneration; it is very damaging to your central vision. Treatment can help prevent complications.
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